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Life in the Arctic – now and in the future
Umeå University lays the entire puzzle

The Arctic is at the focal point at present. The area is forever changing as the Earth is heating up, which also poses a threat to the entire planet. Not to forget though, the Arctic is so much more. At Umeå University, research is conducted on climate and the environment, but also on what life in the North involves – and how it is likely to change in the future. With its northern location – and its broad and extensive research – Umeå University is taking a leading position in Arctic research.

The Arctic, which has no obvious geographical borders, is home to about four million people across eight nations: Denmark (Greenland and the Faroe Islands), Finland, Iceland, Canada, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the US (Alaska). In this area, global warming is noticeable, above all in the form of a milder climate and shifting glaciers and ice mass. It is not only people, animals and plants in the Arctic that are affected by rising temperatures – in the end, the entire prospect of living at northern latitudes, and on Earth in general, will be affected.  

At Umeå University, prominent Arctic research is conducted within all its scientific fields: Medicine, the Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, and Science and Technology. Umeå University houses prominent research, for instance when it comes to projected effects of natural resources becoming more accessible as a consequence of melting ice mass; changes in the spreading of disease; and altered social, economic and cultural conditions for populations and indigenous peoples.

How, if at all possible, can people, animals and the nature adapt? And how is life in the area at present – and what similarities and differences are there with the rest of the World? The University’s multidisciplinary research offers unique perspectives and solutions, and constitutes a united force and mine of information to the entire World.

Spotlight

Climate changes may lead to more poisonous mercury in plankton

Climate changes may lead to more poisonous mercury in plankton

2017-01-27 Global warming is expected to increase runoff and input of organic matter to aquatic ecosystems in large regions of the Northern hemisphere including the Baltic Sea. Research performed in Sweden is now indicating a sevenfold increase in poisonous methylmercury in zooplankton as a consequence. This increase is due to an altered structure of the aquatic food web. The study has been published in the journal Science Advances.


Temperature change affects temperate mountain ecosystems globally

Temperature change affects temperate mountain ecosystems globally

2017-01-25 The warmer climate that is expected over the next 80 years could lead to major disruptions in ecosystems of high mountain landscapes, for example by altered balance between nitrogen and phosphorus in the soil.


Umeå researchers call for stricter measures to reach climate targets

Umeå researchers call for stricter measures to reach climate targets

2016-11-04 On Friday 4 November, the global climate deal from Paris in 2015 comes into effect. On the same day, 94 of 197 parties have ratified the legally binding Paris Agreement that obliges them to contribute to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and to stabilise the average global temperature under 2 degrees Celsius. However, the suggested measures are not still enough, says researchers from Umeå University.



Page Editor: Communications Office
2017-02-02

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