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Climate change

Here you find a number of different areas with associated researcher who in different ways are engaged in research about climate change in and related to the Arctic.

Carbon cycling

Jenny Ask

My research interests are in the fields of aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry. I mainly focus on the lower trophic levels in aquatic food webs, i.e. algae and bacteria, but also [...]

their relative contribution to higher trophic levels. More specifically, I study how biotic and abiotic factors influence the metabolism (production and respiration), biomass development and species composition of algae and bacteria in various aquatic ecosystems. Within this context, I also investigate the structural difference between benthic and pelagic habitats, and how environmental factors control the distribution of metabolic processes between these habitats. On a larger scale, I am also interested in how aquatic ecosystems are affected by processes in the terrestrial environment (such as input of terrestrial organic matter) and the role of aquatic environments in the global carbon cycle.

Ann-Kristin Bergström

Special focus within my research lies within studying the importance of organic matter and nutrients for lake ecosystem productivity and food web structure.

My current research projects concern how global climate change are affecting lake water biogeochemistry, and what possible impacts these biogeochemical changes have on lake productivity and the ecosystem services of northern pristine lakes. We assess how nutrient availability and the N:P stoichiometry in lakes are affected by changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition and by warming, and its effects on nutrient limitation of phytoplankton and zooplankton, nutrient regeneration and trophic transfer efficiencies, and productivity in northern boreal and subarctic lakes.

My research is linked to Arctic CIRC (Climate Impacts Research Centre).

Richard Bindler

Our research within the paleolimnological group is focused on analysis of climate- and environmental changes and their causes, with a focus on the human effects of human activities.

Our studies of longitudinal environmental changes are based foremostly on analysis of natural environmental archives like sea bottom sediment and peat bogs.

Many of today’s environmental issues, such as acidification and eutrofication of lakes, accumulation of heavy metals in terrestrial and aquatic eco systems as well as climate change are not spontaneous events caused only by industrialization in modern time, but are instead usually an effect of disturbances over a long period. The state of contemporary terrestrial and aquatic eco systems and the environment in general cannot truly be understood if knowledge of the historical development up until today isn’t included. Paleoecological studies are important to make us understand the extent and degree of environmental- and climate changes in the modern world. To judge the effects of human activities on the eco systems and the global climate it is necessary to develop and understanding of the natural variation within these systems.

Ellen Dorrepaal

My research focuses on how plants interact with their surrounding abiotic and biotic environment and how this impacts the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to land and vice versa.

Plants are the primary producers of organic carbon molecules and in the arctic, these molecules can remain in the ecosystem for centuries to millennia, due to the low activity of decomposing organisms in the harsh climate. As a consequence, plant activities have reduced the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere considerably, and caused 'climate cooling'. However, climate warming is occurring most strongly at northern high latitudes, which means that both plant productivity and microbial decomposition processes in the arctic may be accelerated. Whether this will cause a net release of CO2 from the ecosystem to the atmosphere or vice versa is a strongly debated topic and in my research group we focus on understanding the responses of the underlying controlling mechanisms.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment.

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Cristian Gudasz

My work focuses on bridging the scales of ecosystem functioning from lake to landscape, lake carbon cycling, climate feedbacks and

quantifying the terrestrial-aquatic linkages of organic matter flows and pools and in particular using analyses of stable isotopes. Current research focuses on quantifying the role of lakes as sources and sinks of carbon and the impact of direct and indirect climate driven changes in the Swedish arctic. Central to the current and future research efforts is bridging the ecological processes across scales, from lakes to landscape and Earth System Models (ESM). Critical to this undertaking is finding scaling relationships and in particular of lake morphometry to characterize the underwater lake landscape that can be used at regional and global scales. Ultimately, to answer fundamental questions about lake ecosystem functioning at landscape scales and bridge the scales of variability in lake ecological processes and I am developing work and an airborne research platform, the Airborne Limnological Observatory.

Jan Karlsson

Jan Karlsson is a professor at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Director for the Climate Impact Research Centre (CIRC).

My research focus on impacts of climate change on the biogeochemistry and ecology of boreal and arctic aquatic ecosystems.

Jonatan Klaminder

My ongoing Arctic research have three main directions; i) the fate of pollutants in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. [...]

Here I work mainly with contaminants derived from households (i.e. pharmaceuticals and daily used products) and heavy metals derived from sulfide mines; ii) The effect of contaminants on aquatic organisms and their behavior; and iii) long-term changes in the arctic environment occurring response in to the ongoing climate change or altered natural processes.

Matthias Siewert

My research aims at understanding Arctic landscape variability, carbon storage and ecosystem dynamics.

My previous work highlighted the value of high-resolution satellite imagery to map soil organic carbon and its variability in permafrost-affected soils. My current research investigates vegetation and landscape variability in the Arctic. In this project I use drones to characterize landscape variability at local scale and compare it to coarse resolution satellite measurements. In the future, we also want to study the influence of herbivores on this variability.

I am also involved in the project A Frozen-Ground Cartoon that aims to communicate permafrost research and the effects of climate change in the Arctic to kids. The project has recently published its first edition featuring the stories: The bumpy road and Climate is warming, my dear Reindeer. A Swedish version is also available.

Dominic Vachon

My research focuses on carbon fluxes between inland waters and their surrounding components such as land, the atmosphere, and the sediments.

Specifically, I use field observations and modeling approaches to better understand the temporal and spatial patterns in carbon fluxes in inland water networks. I am particularly interested in the role of streams and lakes in processing terrestrial carbon, leading to greenhouse gas emission and carbon storage in high latitude landscapes such as the Arctic.

Permafrost

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment.

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment. 

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Jan Karlsson

Jan Karlsson is a professor at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Director for the Climate Impact Research Centre (CIRC).

My research focus on impacts of climate change on the biogeochemistry and ecology of boreal and arctic aquatic ecosystems.

Leif Kullman

Leif Kullman is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Han har forskat bland annat på paleoklimathistoria, arktiska växter och skogar. He has done research on paleoclimate history, and Arctic plants and forests.

Natuschka Lee

The purpose is to explore the microbial diversity in different natural or antrophogenic ecosystems, such as [...]

aquatic (lakes, wastewater treatment plants) and terrestrial systems (soil, sediments, including association to organisms like plants), above or below ground. The purpose is to explore the unknown, novel biodiversity and their role in these ecosystems, since so far only a fraction (about 1 %) of the total microbial biodiversity is known on our planet. The microbial biodiversity of cold climate ecosystems is of significant interest since recent studies on permafrost ecosystems in e.g. America/Canada or in Siberia have revealed a whole range of novel, unknown microorganisms. Similar studies have so far not been performed in Northern Sweden (to my knowledge at the present date).

Climate policies

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Louise Eriksson

Louise is a researcher in environmental psychology focusing on people’s attitudes and behaviours with implications on the environment and natural resource management.

The interaction between physical as well as social characteristics of the context people live in is key to understand different groups’ attitudes and behaviours. In much of Louise’s empirical work, Nordic conditions interact with human dimensions and her research thus covers the individual level of arctic research. 

Carina Keskitalo

E. Carina H. Keskitalo is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden.

Her work has focused on the politics of the development of the Arctic as an international region, and on environmental policy and climate change adaptation in a comparative context. Keskitalo was the research coordinator for Sweden's first Arctic social sciences and humanities research programme, the Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development programme, and for the PLURAL programme on the changing forest owner role.

Keith Larson

I am an evolutionary ecologist and science communicator, living at the Abisko Scientific Research Station, where I am the Project Coordinator for the Climate Impacts Research Centre.

I have spent my career working as a scientist traveling the world experiencing the impacts of climate and environmental change on ecosystems from the Arctic to the tropics. The inspiration for my work comes from being in the field and experiencing nature.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Maria Nilsson

Maria Nilsson is research fellow at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

My research is in the field of climate change and health. My main interest is climate adaptation, climate communication and policy development.

Annika Nordlund

My research interest lies in the areas of environmental and social psychology, and is about how and what psychological factors affect different types of environmental behavior, and also [...]

how different actions to change behavior are perceived and the outout of such. I am an associate professor, Docent, and Head of department at the Department of Psychology, and Research Director of Transport Research Unit (TRUM) at Umeå University. At TRUM, transport and travel behavior are mainly studied with a focus on smaller units, such as individuals, households and small companies.


Research areas:
• The impact of values, attitudes, environmental awareness and norms on; the willingness to act in a environmentally friendly manner, both general and specific behavioral areas, the willingness to support the introduction of structural solutions, the attitude to natural resources of the future such as the forest and water, as well as alternative motives and barriers behind the choice to act environmentally.
• The travel mode choice as a routine decision. How habits of using different modes of transport can change through increased awareness in the decision-making situation and how the effect of increased awareness affects the relationships between attitudes, habits and behavior.
My TEDx Umeå talk is available here.

Elsa Reimerson

I am a teacher and researcher in political science with a particular focus on environmental politics, conservation, and Indigenous peoples in the Sámi and Nordic parts of the Arctic.

My PhD thesis explored Indigenous peoples' space for political agency in the governance and management of protected areas, with a particular focus on Sápmi on the Swedish and Norwegian sides. 2018-2021 I primarily work within the research project Bring down the sky to the earth: how to use forests to open up for constructive climate change pathways in local contexts, an interdisciplinary collaborative project that aims to explore ways to make anthropogenic climate change relevant for people in urban and rural contexts, enable development of optional pathways, and develop measures tailored to face climate change challenges on local levels.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Reindeer herding

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Christine Godeau

My research interest are interdisciplinary.

Focused on land use change driven by green energy transition, reindeer herding and indigenous- and gender perspectives.

Göran Bostedt

Senior lecturer in economics, at the Umeå School of Business and Economics, USBE, and associate professor in resource economics at the Dept. of Forest Economics, SLU.

Also part-time research leader at Várdduo, Umeå University’s center for Sami research. Active at CERE, the Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, which consists of researchers from both SLU and Umeå University.

Research interests include natural resource conflicts in arctic environments, with focus on the conflict between forestry and reindeer husbandry. Another strain of research has been conflicts from growing carnivore populations, where my research has been focused both on costs for livestock owners, non-market benefits of these carnivore populations, and the Swedish system for compensations for carnivore damages, where the latter can be seen as a variant of a PES (Payments for Environmental Services) system. I have also done work on transaction costs in the mandatory consultations between reindeer husbandry and forestry representatives. My research on policy analysis also extends to spatial planning of forest landscapes to promote a more sustainable and diverse management of forests.

Carina Keskitalo

E. Carina H. Keskitalo is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden.

Her work has focused on the politics of the development of the Arctic as an international region, and on environmental policy and climate change adaptation in a comparative context. Keskitalo was the research coordinator for Sweden's first Arctic social sciences and humanities research programme, the Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development programme, and for the PLURAL programme on the changing forest owner role.

Snow

Cenk Demiroglu

Cenk is a scientist specialized in climate change and ski tourism destinations.

In his research, he studies the impacts of climate change on high latitude and high altitude ski domains as well as the associated adaptation needs and their potential rebound effects.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment.

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment. 

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Leif Kullman

Leif Kullman is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Han har forskat bland annat på paleoklimathistoria, arktiska växter och skogar. He has done research on paleoclimate history, and Arctic plants and forests.

Sven Rönnbäck

Sven Rönnbäck is associate professor at the Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

Works in academy with robotic systems and robotic educations. Especially interested in getting students to learn through hands on experience through modeling, programming and building robots.

I have worked on forming statistics on snow-fall detects using laser range finders. This is of importance since snow flakes cause false detects in laser range data and need to be taken care of for robotic systems.

Jun Yu

I and Professor Patrik Eklund at the department of computer science are co-applicants from Botnia-Atlantica within the [...]

project WindCoE Nordic Wind Energy Center. The center is aiming to combine the forces of national research units in order to increase the share of wind power onto grid. The goal is to create tools that are beneficial for the sustainable development of wind power.

Earlier, I have also been working in the MISTRA project "Remote Sensing for Environment" and a number of related projects when I was working at SLU.