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Culture & History

Here you find a number of different areas with associated researcher who in different ways are engaged in research about and related to Arctic culture & history.

Archaeology

Philip Buckland

The Arctic dimension of Philip’s research currently takes three directions: 1. Understanding past climates, landscapes and human impacts in present day Arctic and sub-Arctic regions [...]

; 2. Understanding environmental and climate change in other geographical areas which experienced Arctic conditions in the past (e.g. during the last Ice Age); and 3. Making data from both of these research areas available through Open Access databases. The latter includes the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD), hosted at Umeå University. Much of Philip’s work involves the use of fossil insects as proxies for past conditions, but he also ventures into cultural heritage science and the use of other forms of data to help predict the impacts of future climate change on cultural landscapes.

Malcolm Christopher Lillie

Malcolm Christopher Lillie is professor of archaeology, specialized in the study of wetlands and [...]

human-landscape interactions, environmental archaeology (geomorphology) focusing on hunter-gatherers and also the transition to agriculture. He is also specialized in stable isotope studies of human diet and the study of human remains. Looking for research projects with an Arctic theme to broaden his experiences in the area.

Philip Jerand

My research focus on prehistoric and historic Sámi settlements situated in northern Norway and Sweden, on different altitudes and in dissimilar environments.

From the woodland valley of River Pasvik in the taiga zone of northern Norway, to the mountainous region of Tärna in Västerbotten county, Sweden. I use a multiproxy approach comprising chemical, physical and spectral analyses of soils and sediments, such as phosphate analysis, magnetic susceptibility, loss on ignition, NIR and Raman spectroscopy, together with archaeological remains and ethnographic accounts in order to examine questions of spatial use, methodology, modelling and ethno-archaeology.

Johan Linderholm

I am primarily interested in social- and settlement organization during the Stone Age in the historical northern Scandinavia, but also in the general circumpolar area.

How traces of human activity can be read with the help of soilchemical methods and how this can be related to settlement research, I find very interesting. I am also interested in pioneer colonization and environmental adaption during the older Stone Age.

Ulrica Söderlind

Ulrica Söderlind is associate professor at Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.

She does research on culinary- and hosting traditions in different areas, during different time periods, combining archaeology and culinary science.

Art

Moa Sandström

My research interest is focused on how art expressions and practices from discourse which in turn [...]

affect human relations and philosophical assumptions on humanity’s place in relation to the planet and the universe.

Currently I am working on a dissertation project with the working title Dekoloniseringskonst – artivism I 2010-talet Sápmi In the project artivism (activism through art) in relation to questions of decolonization through mainly four contemporary Sámi artists’ works and activities: the artivist Jenni Laiti (including the artivismcollective Suohpanterror), the pictoral artirst Anders Sunna, the poet and spoke word artist Timmie Märak and also the joiker Jörgen Stenberg. Decolonization kan, in short, be seen as processes which aims for gaining freedom from something colonial, and the adoption of non-colonial alternatives.

Digital cultures

Annika Egan Sjölander

Annika Egan Sjölander is Associate professor at Department of Culture and Media Studies, at the unit for Media- and Communication studies.

She researches, amongst other things, discourse and communication surrounding ecological sustainability and climate changes.

Stefan Gelfgren

Stefan Gelfgren is the director of Humlab and Associate Professor in Sociology of Religion at Humlab, Umeå University.

Gelfgren´s primary research interest concerns the relation between social, technical and religious transformations - today and throughout history.

Moa Sandström

My research interest is focused on how art expressions and practices from discourse which in turn [...]

affect human relations and philosophical assumptions on humanity’s place in relation to the planet and the universe.

Currently I am working on a dissertation project with the working title Dekoloniseringskonst – artivism I 2010-talet Sápmi In the project artivism (activism through art) in relation to questions of decolonization through mainly four contemporary Sámi artists’ works and activities: the artivist Jenni Laiti (including the artivismcollective Suohpanterror), the pictoral artirst Anders Sunna, the poet and spoke word artist Timmie Märak and also the joiker Jörgen Stenberg. Decolonization kan, in short, be seen as processes which aims for gaining freedom from something colonial, and the adoption of non-colonial alternatives.

Ethnology

Alf Arvidsson

In my research I am interested in how music, storytelling, festivals with different cultural aspects pictures and symbolizes local and regional identity, and [...]

[..] is used to create and strengthen such identity positions. Included in this are questions of how stereotypical views become resources and obstacles in self presentation, relations between internal interplay and external expectations, and rural areas possibilities and limitations.

Publications:

Musik, ritual och plats: lokal tillhörighet i Holmsund under 1980-talet. Umeå university, 2016.

Vemod och motstånd: Norrland och norrlänningar i populärmusiken. Anders Öhman & Bo Nilsson (red), Brännpunkt Norrland. perspektiv på en region i förändring. Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017, s 11-39.

Lokala scener och regionala identiteter: motstånd och vemod som tecken för lokal kultur. Paal Fagerheim & Ove Larsen (red), Musikk, folk og landskap, Stamsund: Orkana Akademisk 2015, 51-63

Marianne Liliequist

My scientific productions are within different fields of research: children’s history, ethnicity research, media ethnography and research on new social movements.

Arctic dimensions of my research include:

Dissertation: The children of the settlers. Childrearing among the mountain settlers i the parishes of Vilhelmina, Frostviken and Tärna 1850-1920. The role of the elderly women in northern Swedens mountain regions, today and in a historical perspective. Elderly Sami women as symbols of Sami identity.

Food

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Anne Ouma

Anne Ouma holds a PhD in Social and economic geography from the University of Umeå Sweden and an MSc in environmental science and technology from IHE UNESCO Water Institute, Delft Holland.

Previously Ouma worked, inter alia at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and at the Swedish International Development Cooperation (SIDA) on issues related to biodiversity conservation and Sustainable human development. She has experience in providing expertise to development projects on economic, environmental, social determinants of sustainable human development for over a decade. Her current research focus and interests are connected to the role of traditional /indigenous knowledge systems within contemporary health and well- being. Ouma who has lived and worked in the Arctic with her family for more than a decade and is lead researcher for action research-based consultancies for Region Vasterbotten County Health Ministry on Health Governance partnerships with Kenyan counties .Currently, Ouma is affiliated to the Arctic Centre at Umea University and Centre for Sami Studies as a Researcher. Her latest Publication is a book chapter on Food Security in the High North Contemporary Challenges across the Circumpolar Region. (Published September 10, 2020 by Routledge) which is a result of project collaboration with various actors

Ulrica Söderlind

Ulrica Söderlind is associate professor at Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.

She does research on culinary- and hosting traditions in different areas, during different time periods, combining archaeology and culinary science.

Maria Waling

I'm an associate professor and head of the department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science. 

My main research focus is on different aspects of children's food habits. The past years my main focus has been on school lunch with a focus on the Nordic countries. I am also involved in a research project where a Paleolithic diet and exercise is tested on adults with type 2 diabetes. I mainly teach in classes regarding children's food habits, dietary assessment methods and scientific methods. In 2018 I was rewarded with a price from "Kunliga Skytteanska Samfundet" which is a price that a young, successful researcher at Umeå University receives.

History

Daniel Andersson

Daniel Andersson is associate professor at the Department of Language Studies.

Place-making in a post-colonial Swedish Sápmi with a special emphasis on (1) the way nature plays a part in the narrative of Lapland and (2) the meaning of minority place-names for peoples sense of place, language revitalization and place-based identity.

Pär Eliasson

Pär Eliasson is Associate professor at Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies.

Historian of Science interested in the 18th and 19th century natural history of the Arctic. Also interested in the scientific activities of the German Armed Forces in the Arctic 1933-45.

Johan Hansson

My research is primarily about history didactics as well as educational history and currently I am researching

teaching at the Sámi’s public school in theory and practice from the 1940’s to the 2010’s. Beyond my research I also work hourly as a teacher, primarily with teaching different courses at the teacher’s university education programme.

Susanne Haugen

Susanne Haugen is Associate professor at Department of Language Studies, at the unit for Swedish.

She studies amongst other things Swedish language history.

Anne Heith

Anne Heith is an Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and researcher at the Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University, Sweden.

Between 2016 and 2017 she worked with the research project Decolonisation and Revivalism: The Role of Laestadianism in Contemporary Sámi and Tornedalian Texts. The outcome of the project has been published open access and in print in a volume entitled Laestadius and Laestadianism in the Contested Field of Cultural Heritage: A Study of Contemporary Sámi and Tornedalian Texts (ISBN 978-91-7601-827-9). Her current research projects are: Literature and Place-Making: Meänmaa in Contemporary, Tornedalian, Imaginative Writing, and Other Places in the Teaching of Literature: Sápmi, Meänmaa and Migrant Cartographies.

Between 2008 and 2011 she was a researcher in Border Poetics, Tromsø University, Norway. She has been a guest researcher at the Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden, on several occasions. She participates in a number of networks and projects exploring bordering practices and identity formation. She collaborates with a Nordic network exploring renewal of the genre of literary history.

Martin Hårdstedt

Martin Hårdstedt is professor in history, focused on Nordic military- and political history. Board member for the Swedish-Finnish Culture Fund.

 

My research is primarily focused on military, social and political history, first and foremost the 18th century, the revolutionary and Napoleonic epoch, the period around 1808-09 (my doctoral thesis was about the Finnish war 1808-09) and the time up until the second world war. I have always had a Nordic interest which comes to the fore in my research interests, as they usually are related to the Nordic area and often Finland (and Åland).

Marianne Liliequist

My scientific productions are within different fields of research: children’s history, ethnicity research, media ethnography and research on new social movements.

Arctic dimensions of my research include:

Dissertation: The children of the settlers. Childrearing among the mountain settlers i the parishes of Vilhelmina, Frostviken and Tärna 1850-1920. The role of the elderly women in northern Swedens mountain regions, today and in a historical perspective. Elderly Sami women as symbols of Sami identity.

Daniel Lindmark

My research concerns Sami culture and history, especially Sami interaction with the church and state in Sweden from the 17th century and onwards.

Mission and education are two areas of special interest. Historcial justice is a current theme, more precisely truth and reconciliation commissions with a focus on Sami and other people in the arctic region.

Giuseppe Nencioni

Guiseppe researches the relation between North and South. He says the following about his Arctic research:

I wrote a book (Italienare i Norr, Umeå, Johan Nordlander Sällskapet, 2008 ISSN 0348-6664. Italiani nel Grande Nord scandinavo, Mocalieri, CIRVI, 2014, ISSN 2036-2552) in which I describe the Italians who visited the North (North of Norway, Sweden and Finland) from the Middle Age to today. Their opinion about nature, peoples and so on.

I wrote an article (Samer och blondiner – Mantegazza i Lappland i Oknytt nr. 3-4 2010. Lapponi e Bionde. Mantegazza in Lapponia, i Il Polo,Anno LXXII, n.3, Settembre 2017, pp.49-60) in which I examine a part of the unpublished diary of Paolo Mantegazza, scientist evolutionist who visited Lappland at the end of XIX century.

I wrote a book (The Italians in the Arctic Explorations. A Critique of the Reinterpretation of Nationalism, Umeå University and the Royal Skyttean Society, Northen  studies, Monographs, n.2, Umeå 2011. Gli Italiani e le esplorazioni artiche, Roma, Aracne, 2017) about the seven polar expeditions in which some Italians were involved. I examine the expedition in the light of nationalist ideology.

Christer Nordlund

Christer Nordlund is professor of History of Science and Ideas, studying the cultural, material and intellectual history of [...]

science, technology, medicine, and the environment from ca. 1800 onward, mainly in a Scandinavian context. His research has been focused on three subjects: the history of the field sciences, i.e. geology, plant geography, ecology, archaeology and field institutions; the history of endocrinology and the links between life science, medicine and industry; and environmental history, i.e. the co-construction of environmental science, environmental politics, and environmental problems. He has also taken an interest in current science policy and theories of research organization, cooperation and creativity.

Björn Norlin

Bo Nilsson is a professor at the Department of Culture and Media Studies, and teaches at the Culture Analysis program.

The Arctic dimension of my research is reflected through an interest in rurality, rural morality, rural policy, rural volunteer work and rural resilience. In an ongoing project (financed by Swedish Research Council) I study how smaller societies in rural areas in Norrland can be understood in terms of rural resilience. Furthermore, I study what rural protests, like Doroteaupproret (the Dorotea uprising), local volunteer work and different local initiatives to preserve for instance school services, shops and other social services, mean for people in Norrland’s rural areas and in rural societies in general.

Mats-Olov Olsson

Mats-Olof Olsson is associated to the Centre for Regional Science at Umeå University.

He has amongst other things written the historical books Encyclopedia of the Barents Region, together with Fredrik Backman and Björn Norlin.

Janina Priebe

I am a postdoc researcher in the interdisciplinary project [...]

"Bring down the sky to the earth: how to use forests to open up for constructive climate change pathways in local contexts", funded by Formas. My research in this project deals with transdisciplinary research methods, historical perspectives on societal transformations toward sustainability and local climate change pathways. 

Anna Sténs

Anna Sténs is Research fellow (absent) at Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, at the unit for history. 

She studies land rights in the relation to forestry.

Charlotta Svonni

The educational system and the knowledge content for Sami is central in my research.

I am doing my doctoral degree in history with an educational science aim, and my thesis encompasses the time period from the 1950’s up until today where the contents of steering documents and course plans for the Nomadic school and the Sami school (on the Swedish side of Sápmi) are in focus.

Sami education is done in Sami schools within Sápmi, and therefor also the Arctic, which means that my research is a an obvious part of Arctic research in general.

Maria Wisselgren

Maria Wisselgren is an analyst at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

She has amongst other things done research on northern populations, and is involved in a research project on the maternity care’s institutionalization in Sweden, with a special focus on Sápmi, during the first half of the 20th century.

Languages

Constanze Ackermann-Boström

My research focusses on multilingualism on an individual and societal level in Northern Sweden. Linguistic and cultural reclamation among minoritized language communitues is one of my [...]

main research interests. My current work focusses on the use of Meänkieli among young Tornedalians, Kvens and Lantalaiset. 

Lars-Erik Edlund

Lars-Erik Edlund is professor at the Department for Language Studies and researches dialects and place names [...]

within the northern Scandinavian areas, including spotlighting different language landscapes. Focus lies on the Scandinavian languages, but their relation to other languages within the areas are also taken into consideration.

Susanne Haugen

Susanne Haugen is Associate professor at Department of Language Studies, at the unit for Swedish.

She studies amongst other things Swedish language history.

Eva Lindgren

Eva Lindgren is professor at the Department of Language Studies.

She researches, coaches and teaches within the area of language didactics and is especially interested in questions surrounding writing, language and democracy.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Kirk P H Sullivan

Kirk P H Sullivan is professor at Department of Language Studies, at the unit for linguistics.

He has amongst other things studied indigenous writing and literacy.

Literature

Alf Arvidsson

In my research I am interested in how music, storytelling, festivals with different cultural aspects pictures and symbolizes local and regional identity, and [...]

[..] is used to create and strengthen such identity positions. Included in this are questions of how stereotypical views become resources and obstacles in self presentation, relations between internal interplay and external expectations, and rural areas possibilities and limitations.

Publications:

Musik, ritual och plats: lokal tillhörighet i Holmsund under 1980-talet. Umeå university, 2016.

Vemod och motstånd: Norrland och norrlänningar i populärmusiken. Anders Öhman & Bo Nilsson (red), Brännpunkt Norrland. perspektiv på en region i förändring. Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017, s 11-39.

Lokala scener och regionala identiteter: motstånd och vemod som tecken för lokal kultur. Paal Fagerheim & Ove Larsen (red), Musikk, folk og landskap, Stamsund: Orkana Akademisk 2015, 51-63

Annelie Bränström-Öhman

Annelie Bränström-Öhman is Professor at Department of Culture and Media Studies, the unit for literature.

She has amongst other things done research on the works of renowned Västerbotnian author Sara Lidman.

Lars-Erik Edlund

Lars-Erik Edlund is professor at the Department for Language Studies and researches dialects and place names [...]

within the northern Scandinavian areas, including spotlighting different language landscapes. Focus lies on the Scandinavian languages, but their relation to other languages within the areas are also taken into consideration.

Katarina Gregersdotter

My research area is crime fiction, and in particular the genre Nordic Noir, which is crime fiction that comes out of the Nordic region.

I am interested in many themes, but the notions of place, geography and climate are among them. I am about to start working with the series by Åsa Larsson which are situated in the very north of Sweden, in Kiruna.

Heidi Hansson

Heidi Hansson is Professor of English Literature at Umeå University, Sweden.

In the last few years, her research has concerned the representation of the North in travel writing, fiction and popular culture from the late eighteenth century onwards. She was the leader of the interdisciplinary research programme Foreign North: Outside Perspectives on the Nordic North where her own work concerned gendered visions and accounts of the North and has contributed to several research projects on aspects of the North and the Arctic in literature and culture. She is currently co-editing a transnational collection of articles about the Arctic in literature for children and young adults due in 2019. She is a member of the board of Arcum, the Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.

Anne Heith

Anne Heith is an Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and researcher at the Department of Culture and Media Studies, Umeå University, Sweden.

Between 2016 and 2017 she worked with the research project Decolonisation and Revivalism: The Role of Laestadianism in Contemporary Sámi and Tornedalian Texts. The outcome of the project has been published open access and in print in a volume entitled Laestadius and Laestadianism in the Contested Field of Cultural Heritage: A Study of Contemporary Sámi and Tornedalian Texts (ISBN 978-91-7601-827-9). Her current research projects are: Literature and Place-Making: Meänmaa in Contemporary, Tornedalian, Imaginative Writing, and Other Places in the Teaching of Literature: Sápmi, Meänmaa and Migrant Cartographies.

Between 2008 and 2011 she was a researcher in Border Poetics, Tromsø University, Norway. She has been a guest researcher at the Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University, Sweden, on several occasions. She participates in a number of networks and projects exploring bordering practices and identity formation. She collaborates with a Nordic network exploring renewal of the genre of literary history.

Virginia Langum

Part of my work focuses on geography and climate-based stereotypes.

For example, I have traced ideas of the north and “northerness” in medieval and early modern literature and culture. I also edited Visions of North in Premodern Europe with Dolly Jörgensen (Brepols, 2018).

Maria Lindgren Leavenworth

Maria Lindgren Leavenworth examines how the Arctic functions and changes in speculative fiction [...]

: texts that in various ways present events and circumstances that cannot be aligned with the reader's understanding of reality. Of particular interest is how specific speculative discourses emerge in relation to the Arctic, and how images of the Arctic change through speculative fiction.

Elena Lindholm

Elena Lindholm is associate professor in Spanish at the Department of Language Studies, Umeå University.

For several years, she has specialized in representations of the Nordic region and the Arctic in Spanish literature of the early twentieth century. In the project Feminism and Modernity in Carmen de Burgos' travel accounts of the Nordic Region, she examined how the northernmost parts of Europe were depicted in texts by one of Spain's most famous feminists from the early twentieth century and the conclusions from the project have been published in scientific articles. and book chapters. In the project, she also collaborated with the research program Nordic Spaces at Södertörn University. Within that collaboration, she examined how the Nordic woman was formed in Spanish media as a popular cultural icon at the turn of the twentieth century and until the latter half of the century. The result of the study was published as the chapter "The Valkyrie in a Bikini: The Nordic Woman as a Progressive Media Icon in Spain, 1891-1975" in the anthology Communicating the North: Media Structures and Images in the Making of the Nordic Region (ISBN: 978-1 -4094-4948-5).

Nuno Marques

I work with ecopoetry as methodology and practice of thinking-with, using ecocriticism to research [...]

the formal devices of contemporary ecopoetry to explore and relate with the Anthropocene in its atmospheric and stratigraphic dimensions. I also work with the Arctic as iconic place for those dimensions. In the Spring term 2020 I will teach the Masters course on “The Imagined Arctic” with Maria Lindgren Leavenworth.

Kirk P H Sullivan

Kirk P H Sullivan is professor at Department of Language Studies, at the unit for linguistics.

He has amongst other things studied indigenous writing and literacy.

Anders Öhman

Anders Öhman is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Culture and Media Studies, were he acts as vice head of the department.

He has amongst other things studied the literature of northern Sweden.

Museology

Richard Pettersson

Richard Pettersson is associate professor and researcher in museology at Umeå University, as well as assistant professor in museology.

I am part of two research project: One RJ-financed project that will research the Umeå pastor Pehr Stenberg, from late 18th century, and his vast life. My part of the project will be ongoing between 2019-22.
My second, Formas-financed project, is about questions of sustainable tourism within the Arctic. Research leader is Dieter Müller, cultural geograpgy. My part of the project started in the spring of 2019 and will end in 2023.
My research blends together around one overaching theme: Swedish cultural heritage service during the 20th century. The overarching goal has been, and still is, to reach a better understanding of the causes and roots behind the fact that museums, research and Swedish cultural heritage service has grown paralell with the industrialized society under the last 200 years.

Religion

Johan Runemark Brydsten

Johan Runemark Brydsten is a doctoral student at Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies, at the unit for Religious Studies and Theology

He is active in a research project on Sámi Christian confirmation.

Maria Doeke Boekraad

Maria Doeke Boekraad is affiliated as research student at Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies.

She has studied ethics in relation to Sámi research, as well as ecological sustainability in traditional Sámi beliefs and rituals.

Stefan Gelfgren

Stefan Gelfgren is the director of Humlab and Associate Professor in Sociology of Religion at Humlab, Umeå University.

Gelfgren´s primary research interest concerns the relation between social, technical and religious transformations - today and throughout history.

Olle Sundström

Olle Sundström is associate professor in History of Religions at the Department of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies.

In my research, I have studied religious policies, religious conflicts and interfaith dialogue in the Arctic area. I have followed two main themes: 1) Soviet attitudes towards, and measures against, traditional world views and rituals among indigenous peoples of the Soviet North; 2) the relationship between Christianity and Sami religion in Scandinavia, both in history and in the present. Apart from my own publications, I have been co-editor of various anthologies on these two themes. I am also editorial secretary of the inter- and multidisciplinary Journal of Northern Studies, published by Umeå University and the Royal Skyttean Society since 2007.

Social media

Coppelie Cocq

Coppélie Cocq, Associate Professor in Sami Studies at Umeå University and Associate Professor in Nordic Folkloristics, especially minority studies at Åbo Akademi University.

From January 2019 she is on leave of absence from Umeå University and is employed at the University of Helsinki as Professor of Ethnology.

Coppélie has a Ph.D. in the Sami Studies 2008 with the thesis Revoicing Sámi narratives. North Sámi storytelling at the turn of the 20th century (Sámi Dutkan, Umeå University).

She conducts research within the focus area of digital practices. Her research interests are cultural forms of expression, storytelling and narrative (from oral to digital) as well as critical studies in minority and indigenous research. Ethical and methodological perspectives on digital ethnography are other topical issues in her research.

Moa Sandström

My research interest is focused on how art expressions and practices from discourse which in turn [...]

affect human relations and philosophical assumptions on humanity’s place in relation to the planet and the universe.

Currently I am working on a dissertation project with the working title Dekoloniseringskonst – artivism I 2010-talet Sápmi In the project artivism (activism through art) in relation to questions of decolonization through mainly four contemporary Sámi artists’ works and activities: the artivist Jenni Laiti (including the artivismcollective Suohpanterror), the pictoral artirst Anders Sunna, the poet and spoke word artist Timmie Märak and also the joiker Jörgen Stenberg. Decolonization kan, in short, be seen as processes which aims for gaining freedom from something colonial, and the adoption of non-colonial alternatives.

Johan Örestig

Johan Örestig is a senior lecturer at the Department of Education.

My research interest is focused on how identity formation and conflict patterns around mining project is expressed in activist mobilization on social media platforms. Mining projects are particularly interesting to study because of how conflicts around them includes both global factors (economic situation, international division of labor, alliances between indigenous peoples and environmentalists) as well as national factors (mineral laws, economic growth strategy) and local factors (collision of interests in the local society). This enables examinations of the complex relation between globalization, power relations in local societies and local identities. I have, amongst other things, tried to show how conflict around mining projects tend to revolve around how different actors (indigenous peoples, environmentalists, mining industry, local politicians and union representatives) claim to be those who best represent the long-term interests of the local society.