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Demography & Tourism

Here you find a number of different areas with associated researcher who in different ways are engaged in research about and related to Arctic culture & history.

Ageing population

Christine Brulin

Christine Brulin is affiliated as professor emerita at Department of Nursing.

She has done research, amongst other things, mental health connected to old age.

Sören Edvinsson

Sören Edvinsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research has mainly focused on different aspects of health and mortality in history, in particular social inequalities in health with a focus on northern Sweden.

Ulf Isaksson

Ulf Isaksson is Associate professor at Department of Nursing and is [...]

specialized in the subjects of elderly care, especially with the care of elderly with dementia or behavioural changes, so called BPSD. He has also done research into e-health. His research is foremostly into the elderly, self-care as well as E-health with a rural perspective. He is also engaged in psychometrics where he currently leads a master-student within the HALDI-project.

Nina Lindelöf

Nina Lindelöf is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the units Physiotherapy, and Geriatric Medicine.

She does research primarily on geriatric care, and how physical training/physiotherapy affects the elderly.

Gunnar Malmberg

Gunnar Malmberg is Professor at Department of Geography and director of Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research is about population changes on a national and regional level, focused on migration and aging population. I lead two larger research project about aging populations.

Ingeborg Nilsson

The research we do aims to measure, understand and explain activity engagement, ergo what people do, in the later stages of their lives.

Beyond that we do research to develop efficient activity-based projects to support a healthy aging. The research focuses mostly on the aging population of northern Sweden where many people age in sparsely populated areas with long geographical distances, where social services aren’t as readily available as in cities, and where the share of elderly people are often higher than in other parts of Sweden. These projects we develop therefor need to be adjusted to fit these specific prerequisites, whereby end users are often included in the research process and that digital technology can be used as a tool.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Annika Toots

Annika Toots is affiliated as other position at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She does research primarily on aging related health issues, for instance gait speed.

Olle Westerlund

Olle Westerlund is senior professor at the Umeå School of Business, Economics and Statistics, at the Economics unit. He says the following about his research:

My research is mostly about regional demographic changes and investment in human capital in Sweden. Studies of regional demographic changes includes motivations for regional relocations and economic consequences for individuals' localization choices on an individual and regional level, for an example consequences of regional relocation for differences between peripherial and urban regions when it comes to educational level and income. The research of investment in human capital (beyond labor market related relocations) is mostly about investment in life long learning and the economical effects of adult education.

Leisure

Håkan Appelblad

Håkan Appelblad is Associate professor at Department of Geography.

He has amongst other things done research on sports fishing, running at the Vindelriver area as well as the cultural promotion of place as a 'northern' space.

Cenk Demiroglu

Cenk is a scientist specialized in climate change and ski tourism destinations.

In his research, he studies the impacts of climate change on high latitude and high altitude ski domains as well as the associated adaptation needs and their potential rebound effects.

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Marco Eimermann

Marco is part of a research group (in human geography) focusing on the future of small villages in rural areas, including Northern Sweden.

He is co-editor of a forthcoming edited volume analyzing who lives in, works in and visits Northern sparsely populated areas such as Norrbotten and Västerbotten in Sweden. In one of this book’s chapters, he looks at intercultural communication between Dutch, German and British lifestyle migrants and local Swedish populations. In another chapter, he studies demographic and socio-economic changes in small villages with origins in Norrland’s settler history and how this relates with upcoming and decreasing interests in mining, sawmilling, forestry, and tourism. His research is based on ethnographic interview studies focusing on individual meanings, place attachments and motivations in biographic narratives.

Roger Marjavaara

Roger’s main research focus lies within tourism- and mobility studies with a special interest in leisure housing tourism and migration.

Other interests are flight transports, tourism and shopping, charter tourism and the effect of artificially reproduced environments. The Arctic perspective lies in studies of the consequences of the “Arcticfication” of northern Sweden when it comes to the marketing of tourism companies.

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Migration

Doris Carson

Doris A. Carson is a researcher at the Department of Geography. She is interested in the socio-economic futures of small rural villages and communities in sparsely populated peripheries [...]

, including those commonly found in the inland north of Sweden, as well as the Outback north of Australia. Her research focuses primarily on three broad streams: 1) the processes that hinder or facilitate a transition from ‘extractive’ to ‘attractive’ industries (particularly tourism); 2) the role of mobile and temporary populations in stimulating new development and innovation; and 3) the interplay between urbanisation, mobility and socio-economic change in sparsely populated areas. The latter is primarily focusing on the impacts that growing cities in the north have had on development opportunities in their more sparsely populated hinterlands. Issues around urbanisation and urban-rural divides have become increasingly prominent in the Arctic. Ongoing comparative research in other resource peripheries, most notably in northern Australia, will help identify if there are particular ‘Arctic’ dimensions to such changing urban-rural development relationships.

Marco Eimermann

Marco is part of a research group (in human geography) focusing on the future of small villages in rural areas, including Northern Sweden.

He is co-editor of a forthcoming edited volume analyzing who lives in, works in and visits Northern sparsely populated areas such as Norrbotten and Västerbotten in Sweden. In one of this book’s chapters, he looks at intercultural communication between Dutch, German and British lifestyle migrants and local Swedish populations. In another chapter, he studies demographic and socio-economic changes in small villages with origins in Norrland’s settler history and how this relates with upcoming and decreasing interests in mining, sawmilling, forestry, and tourism. His research is based on ethnographic interview studies focusing on individual meanings, place attachments and motivations in biographic narratives.

Madeleine Eriksson

Madeleine Eriksson is associate professor at the Department of Geography.

My research has evolved around two different but related themes; the representations of the rural and the urban with focus on the northern periphery and urban regeneration, and the disciplining of labour migrants to the Swedish forest berry industry. One important element in my research is the study of representations of 'the other' in relation to, discourses of globalisation, new forms of mobility and different social categories such as gender, race and class. I also stress the inseparability of economic processes from the political, social, historical, and geographic contexts which give them meaning and which may contribute to, or resist, geographies of uneven development.

Gunnar Malmberg

Gunnar Malmberg is Professor at Department of Geography and director of Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research is about population changes on a national and regional level, focused on migration and aging population. I lead two larger research project about aging populations.

Roger Marjavaara

Roger’s main research focus lies within tourism- and mobility studies with a special interest in leisure housing tourism and migration.

Other interests are flight transports, tourism and shopping, charter tourism and the effect of artificially reproduced environments. The Arctic perspective lies in studies of the consequences of the “Arcticfication” of northern Sweden when it comes to the marketing of tourism companies.

Population history

Sören Edvinsson

Sören Edvinsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research has mainly focused on different aspects of health and mortality in history, in particular social inequalities in health with a focus on northern Sweden.

Johan Junkka

Johan is a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for demographic and Ageing Research, primarily studying how social capital was related to historical demographic changes.

In his PhD thesis, he studied how engagement in a voluntary organisation in northern Sweden was linked to falling fertility rates between 1850 and 1950. Currently, Johan is working in interdisciplinary projects based on Swedish Arctic populations, on historical demographic issues such as social capital and health, social temperature vulnerabilities and social inequalities in mental illness.

Erling Häggström Lundevaller

I am a statistician working at the Centre for Demographic and Aging Research (CEDAR) and the Statistics Department and also affiliated with Stockholm University's demographic unit, SUDA.

My research interests mainly relate to different demographic issues. One of these is the impact of climate on mortality, with special attention being paid to differences between different groups, for example between Sami and the rest of the population.


Another research focus is what effect disability has had on individuals' life trajectories both in historical and modern times and how other factors such as gender and social group influence the effect.


Another focus is the influence of genetics on demographic processes where I studied the effects of the blood group Rh- and inbreeding.
As statistical tools, I use methods that enable analysis from a system perspective such as micro simulation and sequence analysis. These methods can often illustrate problems in a more realistic way.


In my research I use both historical data from parish records and modern data from registers that illustrate living conditions and health. Sweden's unique historical data can provide an insight into what life was like in the past.

Gunnar Malmberg

Gunnar Malmberg is Professor at Department of Geography and director of Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research is about population changes on a national and regional level, focused on migration and aging population. I lead two larger research project about aging populations.

Maria Wisselgren

Maria Wisselgren is an analyst at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

She has amongst other things done research on northern populations, and is involved in a research project on the maternity care’s institutionalization in Sweden, with a special focus on Sápmi, during the first half of the 20th century.

Settlements

Doris Carson

Doris A. Carson is a researcher at the Department of Geography. She is interested in the socio-economic futures of small rural villages and communities in sparsely populated peripheries [...]

, including those commonly found in the inland north of Sweden, as well as the Outback north of Australia. Her research focuses primarily on three broad streams: 1) the processes that hinder or facilitate a transition from ‘extractive’ to ‘attractive’ industries (particularly tourism); 2) the role of mobile and temporary populations in stimulating new development and innovation; and 3) the interplay between urbanisation, mobility and socio-economic change in sparsely populated areas. The latter is primarily focusing on the impacts that growing cities in the north have had on development opportunities in their more sparsely populated hinterlands. Issues around urbanisation and urban-rural divides have become increasingly prominent in the Arctic. Ongoing comparative research in other resource peripheries, most notably in northern Australia, will help identify if there are particular ‘Arctic’ dimensions to such changing urban-rural development relationships.

Marco Eimermann

Marco is part of a research group (in human geography) focusing on the future of small villages in rural areas, including Northern Sweden.

He is co-editor of a forthcoming edited volume analyzing who lives in, works in and visits Northern sparsely populated areas such as Norrbotten and Västerbotten in Sweden. In one of this book’s chapters, he looks at intercultural communication between Dutch, German and British lifestyle migrants and local Swedish populations. In another chapter, he studies demographic and socio-economic changes in small villages with origins in Norrland’s settler history and how this relates with upcoming and decreasing interests in mining, sawmilling, forestry, and tourism. His research is based on ethnographic interview studies focusing on individual meanings, place attachments and motivations in biographic narratives.

Tourism

Håkan Appelblad

Håkan Appelblad is Associate professor at Department of Geography.

He has amongst other things done research on sports fishing, running at the Vindelriver area as well as the cultural promotion of place as a 'northern' space.

Cenk Demiroglu

Cenk is a scientist specialized in climate change and ski tourism destinations.

In his research, he studies the impacts of climate change on high latitude and high altitude ski domains as well as the associated adaptation needs and their potential rebound effects.

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Jing Helmersson

Jing is a modeller in public health and a physicist with two PhDs, one in Public Health (Umeå University 2018) and one in Physics (University of Michigan 1989).

Jing has published 76 scientific articles in physics and public health. Her current research is comparison between Sámi Traditional Healing with Traditional Chinese Medicine - literature review and interview study. Her main research interests are Arctic well-being with focus on integration of scientific research with traditional knowledge/practices of Indigenous people.

Her previous research in public health was to study the relationship between climate change and health. She developed mathematical models for vector-borne disease (dengue) and Aedes mosquitoes, and their future projections under various climate change scenarios to support climate mitigation. She was born in China and lived in USA for 20 years before moving to Sweden in 2004. Jing was formerly a professor in Physics from California State University Long Beach with over 20 years of physics research in quantum optics and soft condensed matter physics - magnetorheological fluids. She also has experience in Chinese medicine in the area of disease prevention and lifestyle consultation. In addition, she gives public lecturer/workshops on promoting well-being from body, mind and spirit.

Roger Marjavaara

Roger’s main research focus lies within tourism- and mobility studies with a special interest in leisure housing tourism and migration.

Other interests are flight transports, tourism and shopping, charter tourism and the effect of artificially reproduced environments. The Arctic perspective lies in studies of the consequences of the “Arcticfication” of northern Sweden when it comes to the marketing of tourism companies.

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Örjan Pettersson

Örjan Pettersson is associate professor at the Department of Geography.

He researches, amongst other things, tourism, rural societies, forestry and land use.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Anna Zachrisson

Anna studies natural resource- and environmental governance, particularly connected to sparesly populated and rural areas in the Arctic.

She focuses on conflic situations where different business interests and agents have different interests, and how these can be handled on different administrative levels with the help of different governance forms, to contribute to sustainable development. Governance is about, for an example planning, cooperative governance and participation. Thematically her research encompasses mining, wind power, tourism, environmental care and ecological restoration, and to some degree farming and hunting. Anna works firstly and foremost in cross- and transdisciplinary research projects where scientists of different disciplines cooperate close to the affected agents.

Styrning handlar om t ex planering, samförvaltning och deltagande. Tematiskt omfattar hennes forskning gruvbrytning, vindkraft, turism, naturvård och ekologisk restaurering samt i viss mån jordbruk och jakt. Anna arbetar framför allt i tvär- och transdisciplinära forskningsprojekt där forskare från olika discipliner samarbetar nära med olika aktörer

Ageing population

Christine Brulin

Christine Brulin is affiliated as professor emerita at Department of Nursing.

She has done research, amongst other things, mental health connected to old age.

Sören Edvinsson

Sören Edvinsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research has mainly focused on different aspects of health and mortality in history, in particular social inequalities in health with a focus on northern Sweden.

Ulf Isaksson

Ulf Isaksson is Associate professor at Department of Nursing and is [...]

specialized in the subjects of elderly care, especially with the care of elderly with dementia or behavioural changes, so called BPSD. He has also done research into e-health. His research is foremostly into the elderly, self-care as well as E-health with a rural perspective. He is also engaged in psychometrics where he currently leads a master-student within the HALDI-project.

Nina Lindelöf

Nina Lindelöf is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the units Physiotherapy, and Geriatric Medicine.

She does research primarily on geriatric care, and how physical training/physiotherapy affects the elderly.

Gunnar Malmberg

Gunnar Malmberg is Professor at Department of Geography and director of Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research is about population changes on a national and regional level, focused on migration and aging population. I lead two larger research project about aging populations.

Ingeborg Nilsson

The research we do aims to measure, understand and explain activity engagement, ergo what people do, in the later stages of their lives.

Beyond that we do research to develop efficient activity-based projects to support a healthy aging. The research focuses mostly on the aging population of northern Sweden where many people age in sparsely populated areas with long geographical distances, where social services aren’t as readily available as in cities, and where the share of elderly people are often higher than in other parts of Sweden. These projects we develop therefor need to be adjusted to fit these specific prerequisites, whereby end users are often included in the research process and that digital technology can be used as a tool.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Annika Toots

Annika Toots is affiliated as other position at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She does research primarily on aging related health issues, for instance gait speed.

Olle Westerlund

Olle Westerlund is senior professor at the Umeå School of Business, Economics and Statistics, at the Economics unit. He says the following about his research:

My research is mostly about regional demographic changes and investment in human capital in Sweden. Studies of regional demographic changes includes motivations for regional relocations and economic consequences for individuals' localization choices on an individual and regional level, for an example consequences of regional relocation for differences between peripherial and urban regions when it comes to educational level and income. The research of investment in human capital (beyond labor market related relocations) is mostly about investment in life long learning and the economical effects of adult education.

Leisure

Håkan Appelblad

Håkan Appelblad is Associate professor at Department of Geography.

He has amongst other things done research on sports fishing, running at the Vindelriver area as well as the cultural promotion of place as a 'northern' space.

Cenk Demiroglu

Cenk is a scientist specialized in climate change and ski tourism destinations.

In his research, he studies the impacts of climate change on high latitude and high altitude ski domains as well as the associated adaptation needs and their potential rebound effects.

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Marco Eimermann

Marco is part of a research group (in human geography) focusing on the future of small villages in rural areas, including Northern Sweden.

He is co-editor of a forthcoming edited volume analyzing who lives in, works in and visits Northern sparsely populated areas such as Norrbotten and Västerbotten in Sweden. In one of this book’s chapters, he looks at intercultural communication between Dutch, German and British lifestyle migrants and local Swedish populations. In another chapter, he studies demographic and socio-economic changes in small villages with origins in Norrland’s settler history and how this relates with upcoming and decreasing interests in mining, sawmilling, forestry, and tourism. His research is based on ethnographic interview studies focusing on individual meanings, place attachments and motivations in biographic narratives.

Roger Marjavaara

Roger’s main research focus lies within tourism- and mobility studies with a special interest in leisure housing tourism and migration.

Other interests are flight transports, tourism and shopping, charter tourism and the effect of artificially reproduced environments. The Arctic perspective lies in studies of the consequences of the “Arcticfication” of northern Sweden when it comes to the marketing of tourism companies.

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Migration

Doris Carson

Doris A. Carson is a researcher at the Department of Geography. She is interested in the socio-economic futures of small rural villages and communities in sparsely populated peripheries [...]

, including those commonly found in the inland north of Sweden, as well as the Outback north of Australia. Her research focuses primarily on three broad streams: 1) the processes that hinder or facilitate a transition from ‘extractive’ to ‘attractive’ industries (particularly tourism); 2) the role of mobile and temporary populations in stimulating new development and innovation; and 3) the interplay between urbanisation, mobility and socio-economic change in sparsely populated areas. The latter is primarily focusing on the impacts that growing cities in the north have had on development opportunities in their more sparsely populated hinterlands. Issues around urbanisation and urban-rural divides have become increasingly prominent in the Arctic. Ongoing comparative research in other resource peripheries, most notably in northern Australia, will help identify if there are particular ‘Arctic’ dimensions to such changing urban-rural development relationships.

Marco Eimermann

Marco is part of a research group (in human geography) focusing on the future of small villages in rural areas, including Northern Sweden.

He is co-editor of a forthcoming edited volume analyzing who lives in, works in and visits Northern sparsely populated areas such as Norrbotten and Västerbotten in Sweden. In one of this book’s chapters, he looks at intercultural communication between Dutch, German and British lifestyle migrants and local Swedish populations. In another chapter, he studies demographic and socio-economic changes in small villages with origins in Norrland’s settler history and how this relates with upcoming and decreasing interests in mining, sawmilling, forestry, and tourism. His research is based on ethnographic interview studies focusing on individual meanings, place attachments and motivations in biographic narratives.

Madeleine Eriksson

Madeleine Eriksson is associate professor at the Department of Geography.

My research has evolved around two different but related themes; the representations of the rural and the urban with focus on the northern periphery and urban regeneration, and the disciplining of labour migrants to the Swedish forest berry industry. One important element in my research is the study of representations of 'the other' in relation to, discourses of globalisation, new forms of mobility and different social categories such as gender, race and class. I also stress the inseparability of economic processes from the political, social, historical, and geographic contexts which give them meaning and which may contribute to, or resist, geographies of uneven development.

Gunnar Malmberg

Gunnar Malmberg is Professor at Department of Geography and director of Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research is about population changes on a national and regional level, focused on migration and aging population. I lead two larger research project about aging populations.

Roger Marjavaara

Roger’s main research focus lies within tourism- and mobility studies with a special interest in leisure housing tourism and migration.

Other interests are flight transports, tourism and shopping, charter tourism and the effect of artificially reproduced environments. The Arctic perspective lies in studies of the consequences of the “Arcticfication” of northern Sweden when it comes to the marketing of tourism companies.

Population history

Sören Edvinsson

Sören Edvinsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research has mainly focused on different aspects of health and mortality in history, in particular social inequalities in health with a focus on northern Sweden.

Johan Junkka

Johan is a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for demographic and Ageing Research, primarily studying how social capital was related to historical demographic changes.

In his PhD thesis, he studied how engagement in a voluntary organisation in northern Sweden was linked to falling fertility rates between 1850 and 1950. Currently, Johan is working in interdisciplinary projects based on Swedish Arctic populations, on historical demographic issues such as social capital and health, social temperature vulnerabilities and social inequalities in mental illness.

Erling Häggström Lundevaller

I am a statistician working at the Centre for Demographic and Aging Research (CEDAR) and the Statistics Department and also affiliated with Stockholm University's demographic unit, SUDA.

My research interests mainly relate to different demographic issues. One of these is the impact of climate on mortality, with special attention being paid to differences between different groups, for example between Sami and the rest of the population.


Another research focus is what effect disability has had on individuals' life trajectories both in historical and modern times and how other factors such as gender and social group influence the effect.


Another focus is the influence of genetics on demographic processes where I studied the effects of the blood group Rh- and inbreeding.
As statistical tools, I use methods that enable analysis from a system perspective such as micro simulation and sequence analysis. These methods can often illustrate problems in a more realistic way.


In my research I use both historical data from parish records and modern data from registers that illustrate living conditions and health. Sweden's unique historical data can provide an insight into what life was like in the past.

Gunnar Malmberg

Gunnar Malmberg is Professor at Department of Geography and director of Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research is about population changes on a national and regional level, focused on migration and aging population. I lead two larger research project about aging populations.

Maria Wisselgren

Maria Wisselgren is an analyst at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

She has amongst other things done research on northern populations, and is involved in a research project on the maternity care’s institutionalization in Sweden, with a special focus on Sápmi, during the first half of the 20th century.

Settlements

Doris Carson

Doris A. Carson is a researcher at the Department of Geography. She is interested in the socio-economic futures of small rural villages and communities in sparsely populated peripheries [...]

, including those commonly found in the inland north of Sweden, as well as the Outback north of Australia. Her research focuses primarily on three broad streams: 1) the processes that hinder or facilitate a transition from ‘extractive’ to ‘attractive’ industries (particularly tourism); 2) the role of mobile and temporary populations in stimulating new development and innovation; and 3) the interplay between urbanisation, mobility and socio-economic change in sparsely populated areas. The latter is primarily focusing on the impacts that growing cities in the north have had on development opportunities in their more sparsely populated hinterlands. Issues around urbanisation and urban-rural divides have become increasingly prominent in the Arctic. Ongoing comparative research in other resource peripheries, most notably in northern Australia, will help identify if there are particular ‘Arctic’ dimensions to such changing urban-rural development relationships.

Marco Eimermann

Marco is part of a research group (in human geography) focusing on the future of small villages in rural areas, including Northern Sweden.

He is co-editor of a forthcoming edited volume analyzing who lives in, works in and visits Northern sparsely populated areas such as Norrbotten and Västerbotten in Sweden. In one of this book’s chapters, he looks at intercultural communication between Dutch, German and British lifestyle migrants and local Swedish populations. In another chapter, he studies demographic and socio-economic changes in small villages with origins in Norrland’s settler history and how this relates with upcoming and decreasing interests in mining, sawmilling, forestry, and tourism. His research is based on ethnographic interview studies focusing on individual meanings, place attachments and motivations in biographic narratives.

Tourism

Håkan Appelblad

Håkan Appelblad is Associate professor at Department of Geography.

He has amongst other things done research on sports fishing, running at the Vindelriver area as well as the cultural promotion of place as a 'northern' space.

Cenk Demiroglu

Cenk is a scientist specialized in climate change and ski tourism destinations.

In his research, he studies the impacts of climate change on high latitude and high altitude ski domains as well as the associated adaptation needs and their potential rebound effects.

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Jing Helmersson

Jing is a modeller in public health and a physicist with two PhDs, one in Public Health (Umeå University 2018) and one in Physics (University of Michigan 1989).

Jing has published 76 scientific articles in physics and public health. Her current research is comparison between Sámi Traditional Healing with Traditional Chinese Medicine - literature review and interview study. Her main research interests are Arctic well-being with focus on integration of scientific research with traditional knowledge/practices of Indigenous people.

Her previous research in public health was to study the relationship between climate change and health. She developed mathematical models for vector-borne disease (dengue) and Aedes mosquitoes, and their future projections under various climate change scenarios to support climate mitigation. She was born in China and lived in USA for 20 years before moving to Sweden in 2004. Jing was formerly a professor in Physics from California State University Long Beach with over 20 years of physics research in quantum optics and soft condensed matter physics - magnetorheological fluids. She also has experience in Chinese medicine in the area of disease prevention and lifestyle consultation. In addition, she gives public lecturer/workshops on promoting well-being from body, mind and spirit.

Roger Marjavaara

Roger’s main research focus lies within tourism- and mobility studies with a special interest in leisure housing tourism and migration.

Other interests are flight transports, tourism and shopping, charter tourism and the effect of artificially reproduced environments. The Arctic perspective lies in studies of the consequences of the “Arcticfication” of northern Sweden when it comes to the marketing of tourism companies.

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Örjan Pettersson

Örjan Pettersson is associate professor at the Department of Geography.

He researches, amongst other things, tourism, rural societies, forestry and land use.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Anna Zachrisson

Anna studies natural resource- and environmental governance, particularly connected to sparesly populated and rural areas in the Arctic.

She focuses on conflic situations where different business interests and agents have different interests, and how these can be handled on different administrative levels with the help of different governance forms, to contribute to sustainable development. Governance is about, for an example planning, cooperative governance and participation. Thematically her research encompasses mining, wind power, tourism, environmental care and ecological restoration, and to some degree farming and hunting. Anna works firstly and foremost in cross- and transdisciplinary research projects where scientists of different disciplines cooperate close to the affected agents.

Styrning handlar om t ex planering, samförvaltning och deltagande. Tematiskt omfattar hennes forskning gruvbrytning, vindkraft, turism, naturvård och ekologisk restaurering samt i viss mån jordbruk och jakt. Anna arbetar framför allt i tvär- och transdisciplinära forskningsprojekt där forskare från olika discipliner samarbetar nära med olika aktörer