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Environment

Here you find a number of different areas with associated researcher who in different ways are engaged in research about the Arctic environment.

Animals

Åsa Berglund

My research focuses on environmental effects of mining and covers research sites within the northern part of Sweden.

I'm particularly interested in the recovery of formerly polluted environments, but also cross-ecosystem effects of aquatic subsidies, where I use the insectivorous, terrestrial bird pied flycatcher as indicator species and top consumer.

Roland Jansson

My main research interest is to understand mechanisms behind variation in species diversity among geographic areas and clades at different spatial and temporal scales.

In macroecological research, my main focus is to understand how climate change in Earth’s history has shaped patterns in biodiversity, including global geographic patterns in species richness and variation in species numbers among clades. Arctic and boreal regions stand out in having experienced the largest magnitudes of climate variability. At the ecosystem level, I work mainly with streams and rivers: Most projects focus on different aspects of the restoration ecology of streams and rivers in boreal and subarctic regions: How can riverine ecosystems degraded by human activities be restored or rehabilitated to conserve their species in the face of climate change?

Johannes Karlsson

Johannes Karlsson is a research fellow at Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

He does research on motion sensor tracking of animals in the north.

Keith Larson

I am an evolutionary ecologist and science communicator, living at the Abisko Scientific Research Station, where I am the Project Coordinator for the Climate Impacts Research Centre.

I have spent my career working as a scientist traveling the world experiencing the impacts of climate and environmental change on ecosystems from the Arctic to the tropics. The inspiration for my work comes from being in the field and experiencing nature.

Elin Lindén

My research focuses on how plant-herbivore interactions affects large-scale vegetation patterns and ecosystem processes in Arctic and mountainous ecosystems.

In my PhD project, I look into how long-term grazing shape tundra vegetation and how grazing might influence future vegetation patterns in high latitude ecosystems where the vegetation changes rapidly due to current climate change. I am also interested in how plants ability to avoid or respond to grazing in terms of defending themselves towards it or recovering from it could affect vegetation patterns in these ecosystems.

I investigate the long-term effect of grazing on plant species composition, primary production and nutrient cycling by performing reinventories of old herbivore exclosures in four high latitude ecosystems in Svalbard, Alaska, Canada and Greenland. In a separate study, I examine what the circumpolar (Arctic) variation in chemical anti-browsing defence in tundra dwarf birch looks like in order to see if this might influence vegetation response to grazing at a larger scale.

Jan-Åke Olofsson

Jan-Åke Olofsson is a lecturer at Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

He is part of the Embedded System Group (ESL) which works with new wireless sensor networks for measurements in various environments, such as data collection of animal behavior (digital zoo).

Johan Olofsson

Johan Olofsson is a associate professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

He researches climate changes and how it affects, and is affected by plants and animals.

Bacteria

Fredrik Almqvist

Fredrik Almqvist is engaged in a project where researchers at Umeå University, Tromsø University, University of Lisbon and the Norwegian company Nofima have come together to [...]

investigate what bacteria isolated from this extreme environment can produce if they are allowed to consume the very last end products from the fishery industry.

Besides Fredrik's expertise in organic chemistry an important part of the project is to characterize the metabolic profile and for this task another Professor at Umeå University, Henrik Antti, is an active collaborator in the project.

Agneta Andersson

Agneta Andersson is Professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

She is, amongst other things, involved in the following research projects: (1) Overfertilization and environmental pollutants, (2) Effects of increased flow of organic material onto marine pelagial food webs, (3) Nutrient richness as a selection factor for the occurrence of predation-resistant bacteria in aquatic environments and (4) Microbial food webs’ importance to the survival and presence of Franscisella tularensis, in aquatic systems.

Jenny Ask

My research interests are in the fields of aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry. I mainly focus on the lower trophic levels in aquatic food webs, i.e. algae and bacteria, but also [...]

their relative contribution to higher trophic levels. More specifically, I study how biotic and abiotic factors influence the metabolism (production and respiration), biomass development and species composition of algae and bacteria in various aquatic ecosystems. Within this context, I also investigate the structural difference between benthic and pelagic habitats, and how environmental factors control the distribution of metabolic processes between these habitats. On a larger scale, I am also interested in how aquatic ecosystems are affected by processes in the terrestrial environment (such as input of terrestrial organic matter) and the role of aquatic environments in the global carbon cycle.

Ellen Dorrepaal

My research focuses on how plants interact with their surrounding abiotic and biotic environment and how this impacts the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to land and vice versa.

Plants are the primary producers of organic carbon molecules and in the arctic, these molecules can remain in the ecosystem for centuries to millennia, due to the low activity of decomposing organisms in the harsh climate. As a consequence, plant activities have reduced the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere considerably, and caused 'climate cooling'. However, climate warming is occurring most strongly at northern high latitudes, which means that both plant productivity and microbial decomposition processes in the arctic may be accelerated. Whether this will cause a net release of CO2 from the ecosystem to the atmosphere or vice versa is a strongly debated topic and in my research group we focus on understanding the responses of the underlying controlling mechanisms.

Natuschka Lee

The purpose is to explore the microbial diversity in different natural or antrophogenic ecosystems, such as [...]

aquatic (lakes, wastewater treatment plants) and terrestrial systems (soil, sediments, including association to organisms like plants), above or below ground. The purpose is to explore the unknown, novel biodiversity and their role in these ecosystems, since so far only a fraction (about 1 %) of the total microbial biodiversity is known on our planet. The microbial biodiversity of cold climate ecosystems is of significant interest since recent studies on permafrost ecosystems in e.g. America/Canada or in Siberia have revealed a whole range of novel, unknown microorganisms. Similar studies have so far not been performed in Northern Sweden (to my knowledge at the present date).

Olena Rzhepishevska

I am a microbiologist/molecular biologist. I am affiliated research fellow at the Clinical Microbiology Department and work as a senior research engineer at the Chemistry Department, UmU.

My PhD project was about metabolism of acidophilic & psychrophilic (acid & clod-loving) bacteria from Arctic environments.

Now I work with several projects using metabolomics for biomarker research in infectious diseases, understanding of mixed bacterial biofilms in clinical and biotechnological settings, effect of antibiotics and some other. Here you can see most of my scientific publications.

I am very interested in tuberculosis (TB): drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and biomarkers of TB in human. TB is not only a biomedical issue but also a complex social phenomenon. In 2016, I joined TBnet, a European network of clinical researchers who work with TB. In TBnet I am responsible for Advocacy.

In Arctic countries and in Eastern Europe (with Russia being both Arctic & Eastern European country) TB is still very prevalent and access to healthcare and its quality is still an issue. By my research, I try to improve diagnostic and treatment and advocate for more support to people and countries affected by TB. In Umea, I am a co-organizer of Arctic Meetings on Clinical TB.

Johan Wikner

My research is focused on understanding the causes for hypoxia (lack of oxygen) in the sea and what measures can be taken to solve this issue.

Bacteria stand for near half of the oxygen consumption in the ocean and their ecology is important for the oxygen situation. Organic coal from both algae and contributory streams is the fuel for the bacteria’s oxygen consumption. This is why they are included as impact factors in the studies. We have also shown that the bacteria’s maintenance breathing is a considerable part of the oxygen consumption. It drives the process in the cell which looks after the saline balance, repairs macro molecules and makes it so that the cell can move, amongst other things. The maintenance breathing’s part of the bacteria oxygen consumption increases at lower growth rates. These are foremostly present at low temperatures and low rates of organic coal and nutrients. These sort of conditions are frequent in the Arctic and sub-Arctic areas, mostly at the lower depths of the body of water.

Biodiversity

Philip Buckland

The Arctic dimension of Philip’s research currently takes three directions: 1. Understanding past climates, landscapes and human impacts in present day Arctic and sub-Arctic regions [...]

; 2. Understanding environmental and climate change in other geographical areas which experienced Arctic conditions in the past (e.g. during the last Ice Age); and 3. Making data from both of these research areas available through Open Access databases. The latter includes the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD), hosted at Umeå University. Much of Philip’s work involves the use of fossil insects as proxies for past conditions, but he also ventures into cultural heritage science and the use of other forms of data to help predict the impacts of future climate change on cultural landscapes.

Ellen Dorrepaal

My research focuses on how plants interact with their surrounding abiotic and biotic environment and how this impacts the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to land and vice versa.

Plants are the primary producers of organic carbon molecules and in the arctic, these molecules can remain in the ecosystem for centuries to millennia, due to the low activity of decomposing organisms in the harsh climate. As a consequence, plant activities have reduced the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere considerably, and caused 'climate cooling'. However, climate warming is occurring most strongly at northern high latitudes, which means that both plant productivity and microbial decomposition processes in the arctic may be accelerated. Whether this will cause a net release of CO2 from the ecosystem to the atmosphere or vice versa is a strongly debated topic and in my research group we focus on understanding the responses of the underlying controlling mechanisms.

Göran Bostedt

Senior lecturer in economics, at the Umeå School of Business and Economics, USBE, and associate professor in resource economics at the Dept. of Forest Economics, SLU.

Also part-time research leader at Várdduo, Umeå University’s center for Sami research. Active at CERE, the Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, which consists of researchers from both SLU and Umeå University.

Research interests include natural resource conflicts in arctic environments, with focus on the conflict between forestry and reindeer husbandry. Another strain of research has been conflicts from growing carnivore populations, where my research has been focused both on costs for livestock owners, non-market benefits of these carnivore populations, and the Swedish system for compensations for carnivore damages, where the latter can be seen as a variant of a PES (Payments for Environmental Services) system. I have also done work on transaction costs in the mandatory consultations between reindeer husbandry and forestry representatives. My research on policy analysis also extends to spatial planning of forest landscapes to promote a more sustainable and diverse management of forests.

Stig-Olof Holm

Stig-Olof Holm is an associate professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

I am teaching on courses that deals with ecology and the questions about how a sustainable society will be formed. Example of courses are: Sustainable forest management, Wildlife biology and management, Alpine ecology, Ecosystems,
Ecology and biodiversity, Agriculture and animal welfare.

Roland Jansson

My main research interest is to understand mechanisms behind variation in species diversity among geographic areas and clades at different spatial and temporal scales.

In macroecological research, my main focus is to understand how climate change in Earth’s history has shaped patterns in biodiversity, including global geographic patterns in species richness and variation in species numbers among clades. Arctic and boreal regions stand out in having experienced the largest magnitudes of climate variability. At the ecosystem level, I work mainly with streams and rivers: Most projects focus on different aspects of the restoration ecology of streams and rivers in boreal and subarctic regions: How can riverine ecosystems degraded by human activities be restored or rehabilitated to conserve their species in the face of climate change?

Micael Jonsson

My name is Micael Jonsson and I work as a researcher and teacher at the department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University. My research is carried out both on [...]

land and in water and entails Forest ecology, the importance of biodiversity, as well as sustainable use of natural resources. Specifically, in Forest ecology, I do research on how the presence of specific tree species and stand age affect forests’ ability to deliver multiple important ecosystem services, and how we therefore should manage forests to more sustainably use their resources. In running waters, I investigate carbon and nutrient dynamics and how this is influenced by species composition and environmental conditions. The environment in running waters is impacted by surrounding land, which, in the Arctic region, currently primarily is strongly modified by forestry and climate change. I therefore do research also on ecological connections between water and land, where human activities via climate change and land use alter inputs of organic matter and pollutants. This impacts aquatic organisms and processes and results in change resource flows from water to land, in the form of emerging aquatic insects, which, in turn, has large consequences for land-living organisms that depend on these insects for food.

Natuschka Lee

The purpose is to explore the microbial diversity in different natural or antrophogenic ecosystems, such as [...]

aquatic (lakes, wastewater treatment plants) and terrestrial systems (soil, sediments, including association to organisms like plants), above or below ground. The purpose is to explore the unknown, novel biodiversity and their role in these ecosystems, since so far only a fraction (about 1 %) of the total microbial biodiversity is known on our planet. The microbial biodiversity of cold climate ecosystems is of significant interest since recent studies on permafrost ecosystems in e.g. America/Canada or in Siberia have revealed a whole range of novel, unknown microorganisms. Similar studies have so far not been performed in Northern Sweden (to my knowledge at the present date).

Christer Nilsson

Christer Nilsson is a Professor Emeritus at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences at Umeå University and [...]

a Senior Adviser at the Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies at SLU.

My research deals with organism dispersal and its importance for biodiversity, ecological effects of river regulation and climate change as well as restoration ecology. The studies are focused on boreal and Arctic systems.

Judith Sarneel

For the past years, I have been working enthusiastically as a spatial ecologist with a specific interest in riparian ecology and plant-soil interactions.

Nordic riparian zones provide crucial services to the water bodies they border, it is important to understand the processes that maintain and structure them. Especially in Nordic systems, the disturbance by water and ice is fierce and has large impacts on vegetation development. Dispersal, recruitment and clonal expansion are important focal areas of my research, and I study them now in Nordic rivers and streams. Nordic streams share a history of structural modification to enable timber floating and I am especially interested in changes in establishment after restoration of these streams.

Per Stenberg

To understand complex ecosystems and environmental impact, we need information about the organisms that are present in our environment. We also need to have long time series to [...]

predict changes of the biodiversity in the future. We are in this project using a unique archive of air filters that represents an unbroken 50-year line of samples collected weekly in Kiruna. We can extract high quality DNA from these filters and through modern DNA sequencing we can identify the organisms that get stuck in the filter. The properties of the filters and the huge amounts of air passed (>100,000 m3/filter) make it possible to measure the relative presence of all types of organisms (plants, animals, fungi, bacteria and viruses) from all types of environments (soil, water, land and air).

We now use this unique dataset to answer a number of questions, such as for example:

  • How has biodiversity and occurrences of different types of organisms changed?
  • What types of pathogens and pests are on the rise in northern Sweden?
  • How have the flowering times for plants changed over time?
  • How has the occurrence of antibiotic resistance in the environment changed over time?

Geochemistry

Fredrik Almqvist

Fredrik Almqvist is engaged in a project where researchers at Umeå University, Tromsø University, University of Lisbon and the Norwegian company Nofima have come together to [...]

investigate what bacteria isolated from this extreme environment can produce if they are allowed to consume the very last end products from the fishery industry.

Besides Fredrik's expertise in organic chemistry an important part of the project is to characterize the metabolic profile and for this task another Professor at Umeå University, Henrik Antti, is an active collaborator in the project.

Ann-Kristin Bergström

Special focus within my research lies within studying the importance of organic matter and nutrients for lake ecosystem productivity and food web structure.

My current research projects concern how global climate change are affecting lake water biogeochemistry, and what possible impacts these biogeochemical changes have on lake productivity and the ecosystem services of northern pristine lakes. We assess how nutrient availability and the N:P stoichiometry in lakes are affected by changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition and by warming, and its effects on nutrient limitation of phytoplankton and zooplankton, nutrient regeneration and trophic transfer efficiencies, and productivity in northern boreal and subarctic lakes.

My research is linked to Arctic CIRC (Climate Impacts Research Centre).

Richard Bindler

Our research within the paleolimnological group is focused on analysis of climate- and environmental changes and their causes, with a focus on the human effects of human activities.

Our studies of longitudinal environmental changes are based foremostly on analysis of natural environmental archives like sea bottom sediment and peat bogs.

Many of today’s environmental issues, such as acidification and eutrofication of lakes, accumulation of heavy metals in terrestrial and aquatic eco systems as well as climate change are not spontaneous events caused only by industrialization in modern time, but are instead usually an effect of disturbances over a long period. The state of contemporary terrestrial and aquatic eco systems and the environment in general cannot truly be understood if knowledge of the historical development up until today isn’t included. Paleoecological studies are important to make us understand the extent and degree of environmental- and climate changes in the modern world. To judge the effects of human activities on the eco systems and the global climate it is necessary to develop and understanding of the natural variation within these systems.

Philip Jerand

My research focus on prehistoric and historic Sámi settlements situated in northern Norway and Sweden, on different altitudes and in dissimilar environments.

From the woodland valley of River Pasvik in the taiga zone of northern Norway, to the mountainous region of Tärna in Västerbotten county, Sweden. I use a multiproxy approach comprising chemical, physical and spectral analyses of soils and sediments, such as phosphate analysis, magnetic susceptibility, loss on ignition, NIR and Raman spectroscopy, together with archaeological remains and ethnographic accounts in order to examine questions of spatial use, methodology, modelling and ethno-archaeology.

Jonatan Klaminder

My ongoing Arctic research have three main directions; i) the fate of pollutants in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. [...]

Here I work mainly with contaminants derived from households (i.e. pharmaceuticals and daily used products) and heavy metals derived from sulfide mines; ii) The effect of contaminants on aquatic organisms and their behavior; and iii) long-term changes in the arctic environment occurring response in to the ongoing climate change or altered natural processes.

Venkata Krishna Kumar Upadhyayula

Krishna Kumar is an assistant professor at Department of Chemistry.

Krishna is part of the SRI-platform (Sustainable Resources and Innovation Platform) which works with system-analysis in questions of sustainability and land use.

Climate warming

Richard Bindler

Our research within the paleolimnological group is focused on analysis of climate- and environmental changes and their causes, with a focus on the human effects of human activities.

Our studies of longitudinal environmental changes are based foremostly on analysis of natural environmental archives like sea bottom sediment and peat bogs.

Many of today’s environmental issues, such as acidification and eutrofication of lakes, accumulation of heavy metals in terrestrial and aquatic eco systems as well as climate change are not spontaneous events caused only by industrialization in modern time, but are instead usually an effect of disturbances over a long period. The state of contemporary terrestrial and aquatic eco systems and the environment in general cannot truly be understood if knowledge of the historical development up until today isn’t included. Paleoecological studies are important to make us understand the extent and degree of environmental- and climate changes in the modern world. To judge the effects of human activities on the eco systems and the global climate it is necessary to develop and understanding of the natural variation within these systems.

Philip Buckland

The Arctic dimension of Philip’s research currently takes three directions: 1. Understanding past climates, landscapes and human impacts in present day Arctic and sub-Arctic regions [...]

; 2. Understanding environmental and climate change in other geographical areas which experienced Arctic conditions in the past (e.g. during the last Ice Age); and 3. Making data from both of these research areas available through Open Access databases. The latter includes the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD), hosted at Umeå University. Much of Philip’s work involves the use of fossil insects as proxies for past conditions, but he also ventures into cultural heritage science and the use of other forms of data to help predict the impacts of future climate change on cultural landscapes.

Ellen Dorrepaal

My research focuses on how plants interact with their surrounding abiotic and biotic environment and how this impacts the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to land and vice versa.

Plants are the primary producers of organic carbon molecules and in the arctic, these molecules can remain in the ecosystem for centuries to millennia, due to the low activity of decomposing organisms in the harsh climate. As a consequence, plant activities have reduced the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere considerably, and caused 'climate cooling'. However, climate warming is occurring most strongly at northern high latitudes, which means that both plant productivity and microbial decomposition processes in the arctic may be accelerated. Whether this will cause a net release of CO2 from the ecosystem to the atmosphere or vice versa is a strongly debated topic and in my research group we focus on understanding the responses of the underlying controlling mechanisms.

Annika Egan Sjölander

Annika Egan Sjölander is Associate professor at Department of Culture and Media Studies, at the unit for Media- and Communication studies.

She researches, amongst other things, discourse and communication surrounding ecological sustainability and climate changes.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment.

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Cristian Gudasz

My work focuses on bridging the scales of ecosystem functioning from lake to landscape, lake carbon cycling, climate feedbacks and

quantifying the terrestrial-aquatic linkages of organic matter flows and pools and in particular using analyses of stable isotopes. Current research focuses on quantifying the role of lakes as sources and sinks of carbon and the impact of direct and indirect climate driven changes in the Swedish arctic. Central to the current and future research efforts is bridging the ecological processes across scales, from lakes to landscape and Earth System Models (ESM). Critical to this undertaking is finding scaling relationships and in particular of lake morphometry to characterize the underwater lake landscape that can be used at regional and global scales. Ultimately, to answer fundamental questions about lake ecosystem functioning at landscape scales and bridge the scales of variability in lake ecological processes and I am developing work and an airborne research platform, the Airborne Limnological Observatory.

Roland Jansson

My main research interest is to understand mechanisms behind variation in species diversity among geographic areas and clades at different spatial and temporal scales.

In macroecological research, my main focus is to understand how climate change in Earth’s history has shaped patterns in biodiversity, including global geographic patterns in species richness and variation in species numbers among clades. Arctic and boreal regions stand out in having experienced the largest magnitudes of climate variability. At the ecosystem level, I work mainly with streams and rivers: Most projects focus on different aspects of the restoration ecology of streams and rivers in boreal and subarctic regions: How can riverine ecosystems degraded by human activities be restored or rehabilitated to conserve their species in the face of climate change?

Leif Kullman

Leif Kullman is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Han har forskat bland annat på paleoklimathistoria, arktiska växter och skogar. He has done research on paleoclimate history, and Arctic plants and forests.

Johan Olofsson

Johan Olofsson is a associate professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

He researches climate changes and how it affects, and is affected by plants and animals.

Janina Priebe

I am a postdoc researcher in the interdisciplinary project [...]

"Bring down the sky to the earth: how to use forests to open up for constructive climate change pathways in local contexts", funded by Formas. My research in this project deals with transdisciplinary research methods, historical perspectives on societal transformations toward sustainability and local climate change pathways. 

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Environmental governance

Therese Bjärstig

Therese Bjärstig is associate Professor in Political science and researches natural resource- and environmental governance, foremostly connected to sparsely populated- and rural areas in the Arctic.

She focuses on different forms of cooperation and collaboration between different business interests and actors with the purpose of reaching sustainable solutions. The conditions for this emanate from tools like planning and participation. Her research takes place mostly in the forestry sector, with ongoing studies on key biotopes and multi-use. Other themes in her research is the social value of forests, winder power, municipal planning, rural development, innovation within the farming sector, equality within wildlife management and follow up studies/evaluations within several of these areas. Therese has in many of her projects worked both cross-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary with researchers from other scientific disciplines, and also in close collaborations with practitioners and stakeholders.

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Louise Eriksson

Louise is a researcher in environmental psychology focusing on people’s attitudes and behaviours with implications on the environment and natural resource management.

The interaction between physical as well as social characteristics of the context people live in is key to understand different groups’ attitudes and behaviours. In much of Louise’s empirical work, Nordic conditions interact with human dimensions and her research thus covers the individual level of arctic research. 

Carina Keskitalo

E. Carina H. Keskitalo is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden.

Her work has focused on the politics of the development of the Arctic as an international region, and on environmental policy and climate change adaptation in a comparative context. Keskitalo was the research coordinator for Sweden's first Arctic social sciences and humanities research programme, the Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development programme, and for the PLURAL programme on the changing forest owner role.

Elsa Reimerson

I am a teacher and researcher in political science with a particular focus on environmental politics, conservation, and Indigenous peoples in the Sámi and Nordic parts of the Arctic.

My PhD thesis explored Indigenous peoples' space for political agency in the governance and management of protected areas, with a particular focus on Sápmi on the Swedish and Norwegian sides. 2018-2021 I primarily work within the research project Bring down the sky to the earth: how to use forests to open up for constructive climate change pathways in local contexts, an interdisciplinary collaborative project that aims to explore ways to make anthropogenic climate change relevant for people in urban and rural contexts, enable development of optional pathways, and develop measures tailored to face climate change challenges on local levels.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Camilla Sandström

Camilla Sandström is Professor at the Department of Political Science.

Her research areas include wildlife management, environmental governance, resource conflict with Sámi perspectives and forestry policies.

Anna Zachrisson

Anna studies natural resource- and environmental governance, particularly connected to sparesly populated and rural areas in the Arctic.

She focuses on conflic situations where different business interests and agents have different interests, and how these can be handled on different administrative levels with the help of different governance forms, to contribute to sustainable development. Governance is about, for an example planning, cooperative governance and participation. Thematically her research encompasses mining, wind power, tourism, environmental care and ecological restoration, and to some degree farming and hunting. Anna works firstly and foremost in cross- and transdisciplinary research projects where scientists of different disciplines cooperate close to the affected agents.

Styrning handlar om t ex planering, samförvaltning och deltagande. Tematiskt omfattar hennes forskning gruvbrytning, vindkraft, turism, naturvård och ekologisk restaurering samt i viss mån jordbruk och jakt. Anna arbetar framför allt i tvär- och transdisciplinära forskningsprojekt där forskare från olika discipliner samarbetar nära med olika aktörer

Environmental chemistry

Terry Frank Bidleman

Terry Bidleman came to the Chemistry Department at Umeå University in 2011, following a career as Senior Research Scientist at Environment and Climate Change Canada.

He has held positions at UmU of Visiting Professor, Senior Professor, and now Emeritus Professor. Bidleman’s arctic research involves studies of transport pathways and fate of persistent and toxic chemicals, particularly delivery through the atmosphere and exchange between air and sea. Most recently, he is investigating these pathways for synthetic chemicals in the northern Baltic and natural compounds produced by algae and other marine organisms. He has published over 250 articles on environmental and analytical chemistry in refereed journals and book chapters, and is a frequent contributor to assessment reports of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP).

Reiner Giesler

My research focus on biogeochemical processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with special emphasis climate change effects in Arctic environments. 

In an on-going project, we integrate spatial and temporal variation in stream and soil biogeochemical processes to generate knowledge that can be used to better understand how aquatic ecosystems are linked to the terrestrial environment and their potential response to climate change. We focus on catchments with upland soils; these tundra soils are relatively well-drained and often subjected to physical motion induced by frost processes (cryoturbation) and permafrost. A special interest is the influence of weathering as a source of dissolved inorganic carbon in high-latitude streams. Part of my research is focused on phosphorus (P) dynamics across boreal and arctic landscape gradients with special focus on organic phosphorus. Specifically, I am interested on how P availability may change with the on-going climate induced changes in tundra landscapes.

Olle Nygren

Olle Nygren is Associate Professor and has been working at the Department of Chemistry for about 10 years. 

Before that, he worked for almost 30 years at National Institute for Working Life and its predecessors. Today, he is Environmental Coordinator at Dean’s Office at the Faculty of Medicine. Previously, Nygren’s arctic research was focused on development of simple and robust methods for monitoring chemical exposure in, e.g., cold climates. Today the research with arctic perspective is focused exchange of persistent and toxic chemicals between sea and air, mainly in the Bothnic Gulf. Preferably, natural brominated compounds formed by algae and other marine organisms, but also antropogenic similar brominated compounds. Here, he collaborate with Professor Terry Bidleman.

Environmental restoration

Roland Jansson

My main research interest is to understand mechanisms behind variation in species diversity among geographic areas and clades at different spatial and temporal scales.

In macroecological research, my main focus is to understand how climate change in Earth’s history has shaped patterns in biodiversity, including global geographic patterns in species richness and variation in species numbers among clades. Arctic and boreal regions stand out in having experienced the largest magnitudes of climate variability. At the ecosystem level, I work mainly with streams and rivers: Most projects focus on different aspects of the restoration ecology of streams and rivers in boreal and subarctic regions: How can riverine ecosystems degraded by human activities be restored or rehabilitated to conserve their species in the face of climate change?

Christer Nilsson

Christer Nilsson is a Professor Emeritus at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences at Umeå University and [...]

a Senior Adviser at the Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies at SLU.

My research deals with organism dispersal and its importance for biodiversity, ecological effects of river regulation and climate change as well as restoration ecology. The studies are focused on boreal and Arctic systems.

Lina Polvi Sjöberg

My research is focused on how streams in Northern Sweden form and develop. 

I am interested both in how physical processes like sediment (e.g., sand, gravel, cobbles) transport and how the ecological processes and characteristics recover after restoration.

Judith Sarneel

For the past years, I have been working enthusiastically as a spatial ecologist with a specific interest in riparian ecology and plant-soil interactions.

Nordic riparian zones provide crucial services to the water bodies they border, it is important to understand the processes that maintain and structure them. Especially in Nordic systems, the disturbance by water and ice is fierce and has large impacts on vegetation development. Dispersal, recruitment and clonal expansion are important focal areas of my research, and I study them now in Nordic rivers and streams. Nordic streams share a history of structural modification to enable timber floating and I am especially interested in changes in establishment after restoration of these streams.

Forest ecology

Per-Anders Esseen

Per-Anders is Professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

My research aims to understand how forest dynamics, forestry and climate change affect lichens in boreal forest canopies.

Stig-Olof Holm

Stig-Olof Holm is an associate professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

I am teaching on courses that deals with ecology and the questions about how a sustainable society will be formed. Example of courses are: Sustainable forest management, Wildlife biology and management, Alpine ecology, Ecosystems,
Ecology and biodiversity, Agriculture and animal welfare.

Micael Jonsson

My name is Micael Jonsson and I work as a researcher and teacher at the department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University. My research is carried out both on [...]

land and in water and entails Forest ecology, the importance of biodiversity, as well as sustainable use of natural resources. Specifically, in Forest ecology, I do research on how the presence of specific tree species and stand age affect forests’ ability to deliver multiple important ecosystem services, and how we therefore should manage forests to more sustainably use their resources. In running waters, I investigate carbon and nutrient dynamics and how this is influenced by species composition and environmental conditions. The environment in running waters is impacted by surrounding land, which, in the Arctic region, currently primarily is strongly modified by forestry and climate change. I therefore do research also on ecological connections between water and land, where human activities via climate change and land use alter inputs of organic matter and pollutants. This impacts aquatic organisms and processes and results in change resource flows from water to land, in the form of emerging aquatic insects, which, in turn, has large consequences for land-living organisms that depend on these insects for food.

Greenhouse gases

Ellen Dorrepaal

My research focuses on how plants interact with their surrounding abiotic and biotic environment and how this impacts the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to land and vice versa.

Plants are the primary producers of organic carbon molecules and in the arctic, these molecules can remain in the ecosystem for centuries to millennia, due to the low activity of decomposing organisms in the harsh climate. As a consequence, plant activities have reduced the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere considerably, and caused 'climate cooling'. However, climate warming is occurring most strongly at northern high latitudes, which means that both plant productivity and microbial decomposition processes in the arctic may be accelerated. Whether this will cause a net release of CO2 from the ecosystem to the atmosphere or vice versa is a strongly debated topic and in my research group we focus on understanding the responses of the underlying controlling mechanisms.

Reiner Giesler

My research focus on biogeochemical processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with special emphasis climate change effects in Arctic environments. 

In an on-going project, we integrate spatial and temporal variation in stream and soil biogeochemical processes to generate knowledge that can be used to better understand how aquatic ecosystems are linked to the terrestrial environment and their potential response to climate change. We focus on catchments with upland soils; these tundra soils are relatively well-drained and often subjected to physical motion induced by frost processes (cryoturbation) and permafrost. A special interest is the influence of weathering as a source of dissolved inorganic carbon in high-latitude streams. Part of my research is focused on phosphorus (P) dynamics across boreal and arctic landscape gradients with special focus on organic phosphorus. Specifically, I am interested on how P availability may change with the on-going climate induced changes in tundra landscapes.

Jan Karlsson

Jan Karlsson is a professor at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Director for the Climate Impact Research Centre (CIRC).

My research focus on impacts of climate change on the biogeochemistry and ecology of boreal and arctic aquatic ecosystems.

Insects

Clas Ahlm

Clas Ahlm is professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

He does research on infectious diseases, for example viruses' which are spread through mosquitos in the Arctic area.

Åsa Berglund

My research focuses on environmental effects of mining and covers research sites within the northern part of Sweden.

I'm particularly interested in the recovery of formerly polluted environments, but also cross-ecosystem effects of aquatic subsidies, where I use the insectivorous, terrestrial bird pied flycatcher as indicator species and top consumer.

Sven Bergström

Sven Bergström is professor at Department of Molecular Biology.

Amongst other things, he researches Northern infectious disease and parasitic diseases, which are spread through mosquitos and ticks.

Keith Larson

I am an evolutionary ecologist and science communicator, living at the Abisko Scientific Research Station, where I am the Project Coordinator for the Climate Impacts Research Centre.

I have spent my career working as a scientist traveling the world experiencing the impacts of climate and environmental change on ecosystems from the Arctic to the tropics. The inspiration for my work comes from being in the field and experiencing nature.

Natuschka Lee

The purpose is to explore the microbial diversity in different natural or antrophogenic ecosystems, such as [...]

aquatic (lakes, wastewater treatment plants) and terrestrial systems (soil, sediments, including association to organisms like plants), above or below ground. The purpose is to explore the unknown, novel biodiversity and their role in these ecosystems, since so far only a fraction (about 1 %) of the total microbial biodiversity is known on our planet. The microbial biodiversity of cold climate ecosystems is of significant interest since recent studies on permafrost ecosystems in e.g. America/Canada or in Siberia have revealed a whole range of novel, unknown microorganisms. Similar studies have so far not been performed in Northern Sweden (to my knowledge at the present date).

Olivia Wesula Luande

I am currently undertaking research on mosquito-borne zoonoses in humans and animals in the Arctic region with an aim of [...]

determining the abundance and distribution of diverse mosquito species by means of high-throughput genetic characterization; determining the occurrence and genetic diversity of mosquito-borne viruses; development of a model for mosquito vector competence for mosquito-borne viruses.

Lake & watershed ecosystems

Agneta Andersson

Agneta Andersson is Professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

She is, amongst other things, involved in the following research projects: (1) Overfertilization and environmental pollutants, (2) Effects of increased flow of organic material onto marine pelagial food webs, (3) Nutrient richness as a selection factor for the occurrence of predation-resistant bacteria in aquatic environments and (4) Microbial food webs’ importance to the survival and presence of Franscisella tularensis, in aquatic systems.

Jenny Ask

My research interests are in the fields of aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry. I mainly focus on the lower trophic levels in aquatic food webs, i.e. algae and bacteria, but also [...]

their relative contribution to higher trophic levels. More specifically, I study how biotic and abiotic factors influence the metabolism (production and respiration), biomass development and species composition of algae and bacteria in various aquatic ecosystems. Within this context, I also investigate the structural difference between benthic and pelagic habitats, and how environmental factors control the distribution of metabolic processes between these habitats. On a larger scale, I am also interested in how aquatic ecosystems are affected by processes in the terrestrial environment (such as input of terrestrial organic matter) and the role of aquatic environments in the global carbon cycle.

Ann-Kristin Bergström

Special focus within my research lies within studying the importance of organic matter and nutrients for lake ecosystem productivity and food web structure.

My current research projects concern how global climate change are affecting lake water biogeochemistry, and what possible impacts these biogeochemical changes have on lake productivity and the ecosystem services of northern pristine lakes. We assess how nutrient availability and the N:P stoichiometry in lakes are affected by changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition and by warming, and its effects on nutrient limitation of phytoplankton and zooplankton, nutrient regeneration and trophic transfer efficiencies, and productivity in northern boreal and subarctic lakes.

My research is linked to Arctic CIRC (Climate Impacts Research Centre).

Christian Bigler

I am an environmental scientist with paleolimnology as main research subject, aiming to understand [...]

the long-term dynamics of inland waters, in particular changes associated with climate change, human impacts (e.g., eutrophication or acidification), and internal ontogenic processes. The analysis of diatoms (microscopic algae) in lake sediments has been the central theme within my research.

Pär Byström

My research focuses on the factors that determine the abundance, growth and size structure of predatory fish.

I am particularly interested in how populations of Arctic char and brown trout but also perch and pike are influenced by the environment and the interactions within and between these species and their food resources. I work in temperate and arctic aquatic ecosystems from the coast to the mountains.  My research also involves collaborations with Sami villages and county boards aiming to increase the understanding how fish populations and aquatic ecosystems are affected by climate change and fishing to be used for future preservation and sustainable use of fish populations.

Göran Englund

In one project, I study the rapid speciation that occurs in many Scandinavian whitefish populations. 

The overarching objective is to understand how a speciation process initiates - what's the "spark" that makes individuals to develop in different directions? In a subproject we study the history of different whitefish populations by analyzing DNA preserved in lake sediments.

Another project investigates how climate, connectivity, and non-native species affect the distribution of freshwater fishes. In a subproject we are developing a map-based web service, where fishery managers can make experiments, for example by turning up the temperature, removing dams or introducing non-native species and then examine the consequences for different species.

Cristian Gudasz

My work focuses on bridging the scales of ecosystem functioning from lake to landscape, lake carbon cycling, climate feedbacks and

quantifying the terrestrial-aquatic linkages of organic matter flows and pools and in particular using analyses of stable isotopes. Current research focuses on quantifying the role of lakes as sources and sinks of carbon and the impact of direct and indirect climate driven changes in the Swedish arctic. Central to the current and future research efforts is bridging the ecological processes across scales, from lakes to landscape and Earth System Models (ESM). Critical to this undertaking is finding scaling relationships and in particular of lake morphometry to characterize the underwater lake landscape that can be used at regional and global scales. Ultimately, to answer fundamental questions about lake ecosystem functioning at landscape scales and bridge the scales of variability in lake ecological processes and I am developing work and an airborne research platform, the Airborne Limnological Observatory.

Stig-Olof Holm

Stig-Olof Holm is an associate professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

I am teaching on courses that deals with ecology and the questions about how a sustainable society will be formed. Example of courses are: Sustainable forest management, Wildlife biology and management, Alpine ecology, Ecosystems,
Ecology and biodiversity, Agriculture and animal welfare.

Roland Jansson

My main research interest is to understand mechanisms behind variation in species diversity among geographic areas and clades at different spatial and temporal scales.

In macroecological research, my main focus is to understand how climate change in Earth’s history has shaped patterns in biodiversity, including global geographic patterns in species richness and variation in species numbers among clades. Arctic and boreal regions stand out in having experienced the largest magnitudes of climate variability. At the ecosystem level, I work mainly with streams and rivers: Most projects focus on different aspects of the restoration ecology of streams and rivers in boreal and subarctic regions: How can riverine ecosystems degraded by human activities be restored or rehabilitated to conserve their species in the face of climate change?

Micael Jonsson

My name is Micael Jonsson and I work as a researcher and teacher at the department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University. My research is carried out both on [...]

land and in water and entails Forest ecology, the importance of biodiversity, as well as sustainable use of natural resources. Specifically, in Forest ecology, I do research on how the presence of specific tree species and stand age affect forests’ ability to deliver multiple important ecosystem services, and how we therefore should manage forests to more sustainably use their resources. In running waters, I investigate carbon and nutrient dynamics and how this is influenced by species composition and environmental conditions. The environment in running waters is impacted by surrounding land, which, in the Arctic region, currently primarily is strongly modified by forestry and climate change. I therefore do research also on ecological connections between water and land, where human activities via climate change and land use alter inputs of organic matter and pollutants. This impacts aquatic organisms and processes and results in change resource flows from water to land, in the form of emerging aquatic insects, which, in turn, has large consequences for land-living organisms that depend on these insects for food.

Jan Karlsson

Jan Karlsson is a professor at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Director for the Climate Impact Research Centre (CIRC).

My research focus on impacts of climate change on the biogeochemistry and ecology of boreal and arctic aquatic ecosystems.

Jonatan Klaminder

My ongoing Arctic research have three main directions; i) the fate of pollutants in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem. [...]

Here I work mainly with contaminants derived from households (i.e. pharmaceuticals and daily used products) and heavy metals derived from sulfide mines; ii) The effect of contaminants on aquatic organisms and their behavior; and iii) long-term changes in the arctic environment occurring response in to the ongoing climate change or altered natural processes.

Christer Nilsson

Christer Nilsson is a Professor Emeritus at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences at Umeå University and [...]

a Senior Adviser at the Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies at SLU.

My research deals with organism dispersal and its importance for biodiversity, ecological effects of river regulation and climate change as well as restoration ecology. The studies are focused on boreal and Arctic systems.

Sven Norman

I study the effects of climate change on the production of fish in Arctic and subarctic lakes.

My work also includes effects of fishing and management of lake fish populations.

Lina Polvi Sjöberg

My research is focused on how streams in Northern Sweden form and develop. 

I am interested both in how physical processes like sediment (e.g., sand, gravel, cobbles) transport and how the ecological processes and characteristics recover after restoration.

Judith Sarneel

For the past years, I have been working enthusiastically as a spatial ecologist with a specific interest in riparian ecology and plant-soil interactions.

Nordic riparian zones provide crucial services to the water bodies they border, it is important to understand the processes that maintain and structure them. Especially in Nordic systems, the disturbance by water and ice is fierce and has large impacts on vegetation development. Dispersal, recruitment and clonal expansion are important focal areas of my research, and I study them now in Nordic rivers and streams. Nordic streams share a history of structural modification to enable timber floating and I am especially interested in changes in establishment after restoration of these streams.

Sara Sjöstedt de Luna

Sara Sjöstedt de Luna is Deputy Dean at the Faculty of Science and Technology and Professor at Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.

She works with climate reconstruction models, going thousands of year back, using lake sediment from Northern Sweden.

Dominic Vachon

My research focuses on carbon fluxes between inland waters and their surrounding components such as land, the atmosphere, and the sediments.

Specifically, I use field observations and modeling approaches to better understand the temporal and spatial patterns in carbon fluxes in inland water networks. I am particularly interested in the role of streams and lakes in processing terrestrial carbon, leading to greenhouse gas emission and carbon storage in high latitude landscapes such as the Arctic.

Limnology

Christian Bigler

I am an environmental scientist with paleolimnology as main research subject, aiming to understand [...]

the long-term dynamics of inland waters, in particular changes associated with climate change, human impacts (e.g., eutrophication or acidification), and internal ontogenic processes. The analysis of diatoms (microscopic algae) in lake sediments has been the central theme within my research.

Richard Bindler

Our research within the paleolimnological group is focused on analysis of climate- and environmental changes and their causes, with a focus on the human effects of human activities.

Our studies of longitudinal environmental changes are based foremostly on analysis of natural environmental archives like sea bottom sediment and peat bogs.

Many of today’s environmental issues, such as acidification and eutrofication of lakes, accumulation of heavy metals in terrestrial and aquatic eco systems as well as climate change are not spontaneous events caused only by industrialization in modern time, but are instead usually an effect of disturbances over a long period. The state of contemporary terrestrial and aquatic eco systems and the environment in general cannot truly be understood if knowledge of the historical development up until today isn’t included. Paleoecological studies are important to make us understand the extent and degree of environmental- and climate changes in the modern world. To judge the effects of human activities on the eco systems and the global climate it is necessary to develop and understanding of the natural variation within these systems.

Göran Englund

In one project, I study the rapid speciation that occurs in many Scandinavian whitefish populations. 

The overarching objective is to understand how a speciation process initiates - what's the "spark" that makes individuals to develop in different directions? In a subproject we study the history of different whitefish populations by analyzing DNA preserved in lake sediments.

Another project investigates how climate, connectivity, and non-native species affect the distribution of freshwater fishes. In a subproject we are developing a map-based web service, where fishery managers can make experiments, for example by turning up the temperature, removing dams or introducing non-native species and then examine the consequences for different species.

Cristian Gudasz

My work focuses on bridging the scales of ecosystem functioning from lake to landscape, lake carbon cycling, climate feedbacks and

quantifying the terrestrial-aquatic linkages of organic matter flows and pools and in particular using analyses of stable isotopes. Current research focuses on quantifying the role of lakes as sources and sinks of carbon and the impact of direct and indirect climate driven changes in the Swedish arctic. Central to the current and future research efforts is bridging the ecological processes across scales, from lakes to landscape and Earth System Models (ESM). Critical to this undertaking is finding scaling relationships and in particular of lake morphometry to characterize the underwater lake landscape that can be used at regional and global scales. Ultimately, to answer fundamental questions about lake ecosystem functioning at landscape scales and bridge the scales of variability in lake ecological processes and I am developing work and an airborne research platform, the Airborne Limnological Observatory.

Siv Huseby

Siv Huseby is an environmental analyst at Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).

I investigate the marine environment in the Gulf of Bothnia. In my work I lead the monitoring program for the hydrography, chemistry and biology of the pelagic environment in the Gulf of Bothnia, which is part of the Swedish national environmental monitoring programme. The Gulf of Bothnia is an interesting area with its low salinities, high runoff from land and ice cover during winter. The results are important not only for understanding the environmental situation in the Gulf of Bothnia but they are also relevant for other areas such as further north in the Arctic as the environmental situation and the forecast with a changing climate is in many ways similar. I investigate these time series in order to find trends and correlations between different variables. My special interest is phytoplankton and also their species composition and how this is affected by changing environmental situation. I also study trends for bacteria biomass and production. The studies are often linked to eutrophication and national and international environmental goals for the ocean.

Jan Karlsson

Jan Karlsson is a professor at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Director for the Climate Impact Research Centre (CIRC).

My research focus on impacts of climate change on the biogeochemistry and ecology of boreal and arctic aquatic ecosystems.

Sven Norman

I study the effects of climate change on the production of fish in Arctic and subarctic lakes.

My work also includes effects of fishing and management of lake fish populations.

Dominic Vachon

My research focuses on carbon fluxes between inland waters and their surrounding components such as land, the atmosphere, and the sediments.

Specifically, I use field observations and modeling approaches to better understand the temporal and spatial patterns in carbon fluxes in inland water networks. I am particularly interested in the role of streams and lakes in processing terrestrial carbon, leading to greenhouse gas emission and carbon storage in high latitude landscapes such as the Arctic.

Marine

Fredrik Almqvist

Fredrik Almqvist is engaged in a project where researchers at Umeå University, Tromsø University, University of Lisbon and the Norwegian company Nofima have come together to [...]

investigate what bacteria isolated from this extreme environment can produce if they are allowed to consume the very last end products from the fishery industry.

Besides Fredrik's expertise in organic chemistry an important part of the project is to characterize the metabolic profile and for this task another Professor at Umeå University, Henrik Antti, is an active collaborator in the project.

Agneta Andersson

Agneta Andersson is Professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

She is, amongst other things, involved in the following research projects: (1) Overfertilization and environmental pollutants, (2) Effects of increased flow of organic material onto marine pelagial food webs, (3) Nutrient richness as a selection factor for the occurrence of predation-resistant bacteria in aquatic environments and (4) Microbial food webs’ importance to the survival and presence of Franscisella tularensis, in aquatic systems.

Jenny Ask

My research interests are in the fields of aquatic ecology and biogeochemistry. I mainly focus on the lower trophic levels in aquatic food webs, i.e. algae and bacteria, but also [...]

their relative contribution to higher trophic levels. More specifically, I study how biotic and abiotic factors influence the metabolism (production and respiration), biomass development and species composition of algae and bacteria in various aquatic ecosystems. Within this context, I also investigate the structural difference between benthic and pelagic habitats, and how environmental factors control the distribution of metabolic processes between these habitats. On a larger scale, I am also interested in how aquatic ecosystems are affected by processes in the terrestrial environment (such as input of terrestrial organic matter) and the role of aquatic environments in the global carbon cycle.

Terry Frank Bidleman

Terry Bidleman came to the Chemistry Department at Umeå University in 2011, following a career as Senior Research Scientist at Environment and Climate Change Canada.

He has held positions at UmU of Visiting Professor, Senior Professor, and now Emeritus Professor. Bidleman’s arctic research involves studies of transport pathways and fate of persistent and toxic chemicals, particularly delivery through the atmosphere and exchange between air and sea. Most recently, he is investigating these pathways for synthetic chemicals in the northern Baltic and natural compounds produced by algae and other marine organisms. He has published over 250 articles on environmental and analytical chemistry in refereed journals and book chapters, and is a frequent contributor to assessment reports of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP).

Pär Byström

My research focuses on the factors that determine the abundance, growth and size structure of predatory fish.

I am particularly interested in how populations of Arctic char and brown trout but also perch and pike are influenced by the environment and the interactions within and between these species and their food resources. I work in temperate and arctic aquatic ecosystems from the coast to the mountains.  My research also involves collaborations with Sami villages and county boards aiming to increase the understanding how fish populations and aquatic ecosystems are affected by climate change and fishing to be used for future preservation and sustainable use of fish populations.

Karl Forsell

My research is about work environment for seafarers. 

During last years, there has been an increase in the ship traffic through the Northeast passage between Europe and Asia made possible by decreasing ice in the Arctic. The work environment for seafarers operating the area is however poorly investigated.

Siv Huseby

Siv Huseby is an environmental analyst at Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).

I investigate the marine environment in the Gulf of Bothnia. In my work I lead the monitoring program for the hydrography, chemistry and biology of the pelagic environment in the Gulf of Bothnia, which is part of the Swedish national environmental monitoring programme. The Gulf of Bothnia is an interesting area with its low salinities, high runoff from land and ice cover during winter. The results are important not only for understanding the environmental situation in the Gulf of Bothnia but they are also relevant for other areas such as further north in the Arctic as the environmental situation and the forecast with a changing climate is in many ways similar. I investigate these time series in order to find trends and correlations between different variables. My special interest is phytoplankton and also their species composition and how this is affected by changing environmental situation. I also study trends for bacteria biomass and production. The studies are often linked to eutrophication and national and international environmental goals for the ocean.

Olle Nygren

Olle Nygren is Associate Professor and has been working at the Department of Chemistry for about 10 years. 

Before that, he worked for almost 30 years at National Institute for Working Life and its predecessors. Today, he is Environmental Coordinator at Dean’s Office at the Faculty of Medicine. Previously, Nygren’s arctic research was focused on development of simple and robust methods for monitoring chemical exposure in, e.g., cold climates. Today the research with arctic perspective is focused exchange of persistent and toxic chemicals between sea and air, mainly in the Bothnic Gulf. Preferably, natural brominated compounds formed by algae and other marine organisms, but also antropogenic similar brominated compounds. Here, he collaborate with Professor Terry Bidleman.

David Seekell

David Seekell is an environmental scientist focused on Earth’s inland waters.

His research is united by questions about the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems and the causes and consequences of changes in these systems. He works in boreal, arctic, and alpine landscapes of northern Sweden.

Johan Wikner

My research is focused on understanding the causes for hypoxia (lack of oxygen) in the sea and what measures can be taken to solve this issue.

Bacteria stand for near half of the oxygen consumption in the ocean and their ecology is important for the oxygen situation. Organic coal from both algae and contributory streams is the fuel for the bacteria’s oxygen consumption. This is why they are included as impact factors in the studies. We have also shown that the bacteria’s maintenance breathing is a considerable part of the oxygen consumption. It drives the process in the cell which looks after the saline balance, repairs macro molecules and makes it so that the cell can move, amongst other things. The maintenance breathing’s part of the bacteria oxygen consumption increases at lower growth rates. These are foremostly present at low temperatures and low rates of organic coal and nutrients. These sort of conditions are frequent in the Arctic and sub-Arctic areas, mostly at the lower depths of the body of water.

Plants

Ellen Dorrepaal

My research focuses on how plants interact with their surrounding abiotic and biotic environment and how this impacts the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to land and vice versa.

Plants are the primary producers of organic carbon molecules and in the arctic, these molecules can remain in the ecosystem for centuries to millennia, due to the low activity of decomposing organisms in the harsh climate. As a consequence, plant activities have reduced the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere considerably, and caused 'climate cooling'. However, climate warming is occurring most strongly at northern high latitudes, which means that both plant productivity and microbial decomposition processes in the arctic may be accelerated. Whether this will cause a net release of CO2 from the ecosystem to the atmosphere or vice versa is a strongly debated topic and in my research group we focus on understanding the responses of the underlying controlling mechanisms.

Maria Eriksson

My research is focused on experimental characterization of the plant circadian clock and how it regulates growth and development. 

In order to do so I use both annual and perennial species such as thale cress and aspen. My work has identified proteins that form part of the clock mechanism and established a functional role of the circadian clock in seasonal regulation of growth and adaptation to cold of aspen trees, which is of highest importance for their growth and survival at high latitudes. This line of research is therefore of great importance for plant production, adaptation to cold and in a wider context for plants' adaptation to a changing environment and climate.

Per-Anders Esseen

Per-Anders is Professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

My research aims to understand how forest dynamics, forestry and climate change affect lichens in boreal forest canopies.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment.

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment. 

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Leif Kullman

Leif Kullman is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

Han har forskat bland annat på paleoklimathistoria, arktiska växter och skogar. He has done research on paleoclimate history, and Arctic plants and forests.

Natuschka Lee

The purpose is to explore the microbial diversity in different natural or antrophogenic ecosystems, such as [...]

aquatic (lakes, wastewater treatment plants) and terrestrial systems (soil, sediments, including association to organisms like plants), above or below ground. The purpose is to explore the unknown, novel biodiversity and their role in these ecosystems, since so far only a fraction (about 1 %) of the total microbial biodiversity is known on our planet. The microbial biodiversity of cold climate ecosystems is of significant interest since recent studies on permafrost ecosystems in e.g. America/Canada or in Siberia have revealed a whole range of novel, unknown microorganisms. Similar studies have so far not been performed in Northern Sweden (to my knowledge at the present date).

Elin Lindén

My research focuses on how plant-herbivore interactions affects large-scale vegetation patterns and ecosystem processes in Arctic and mountainous ecosystems.

In my PhD project, I look into how long-term grazing shape tundra vegetation and how grazing might influence future vegetation patterns in high latitude ecosystems where the vegetation changes rapidly due to current climate change. I am also interested in how plants ability to avoid or respond to grazing in terms of defending themselves towards it or recovering from it could affect vegetation patterns in these ecosystems.

I investigate the long-term effect of grazing on plant species composition, primary production and nutrient cycling by performing reinventories of old herbivore exclosures in four high latitude ecosystems in Svalbard, Alaska, Canada and Greenland. In a separate study, I examine what the circumpolar (Arctic) variation in chemical anti-browsing defence in tundra dwarf birch looks like in order to see if this might influence vegetation response to grazing at a larger scale.

Johan Olofsson

Johan Olofsson is a associate professor at Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

He researches climate changes and how it affects, and is affected by plants and animals.

Anne Ouma

Anne Ouma holds a PhD in Social and economic geography from the University of Umeå Sweden and an MSc in environmental science and technology from IHE UNESCO Water Institute, Delft Holland.

Previously Ouma worked, inter alia at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and at the Swedish International Development Cooperation (SIDA) on issues related to biodiversity conservation and Sustainable human development. She has experience in providing expertise to development projects on economic, environmental, social determinants of sustainable human development for over a decade. Her current research focus and interests are connected to the role of traditional /indigenous knowledge systems within contemporary health and well- being. Ouma who has lived and worked in the Arctic with her family for more than a decade and is lead researcher for action research-based consultancies for Region Vasterbotten County Health Ministry on Health Governance partnerships with Kenyan counties .Currently, Ouma is affiliated to the Arctic Centre at Umea University and Centre for Sami Studies as a Researcher. Her latest Publication is a book chapter on Food Security in the High North Contemporary Challenges across the Circumpolar Region. (Published September 10, 2020 by Routledge) which is a result of project collaboration with various actors

Judith Sarneel

For the past years, I have been working enthusiastically as a spatial ecologist with a specific interest in riparian ecology and plant-soil interactions.

Nordic riparian zones provide crucial services to the water bodies they border, it is important to understand the processes that maintain and structure them. Especially in Nordic systems, the disturbance by water and ice is fierce and has large impacts on vegetation development. Dispersal, recruitment and clonal expansion are important focal areas of my research, and I study them now in Nordic rivers and streams. Nordic streams share a history of structural modification to enable timber floating and I am especially interested in changes in establishment after restoration of these streams.

Pollutants

Åsa Berglund

My research focuses on environmental effects of mining and covers research sites within the northern part of Sweden.

I'm particularly interested in the recovery of formerly polluted environments, but also cross-ecosystem effects of aquatic subsidies, where I use the insectivorous, terrestrial bird pied flycatcher as indicator species and top consumer.

Terry Frank Bidleman

Terry Bidleman came to the Chemistry Department at Umeå University in 2011, following a career as Senior Research Scientist at Environment and Climate Change Canada.

He has held positions at UmU of Visiting Professor, Senior Professor, and now Emeritus Professor. Bidleman’s arctic research involves studies of transport pathways and fate of persistent and toxic chemicals, particularly delivery through the atmosphere and exchange between air and sea. Most recently, he is investigating these pathways for synthetic chemicals in the northern Baltic and natural compounds produced by algae and other marine organisms. He has published over 250 articles on environmental and analytical chemistry in refereed journals and book chapters, and is a frequent contributor to assessment reports of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP).

Christoffer Boman

Christoffer Boman is associate professor at the Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

His research is, amongst other things, about pollutants and waste.

Kåre Eriksson

Kåre Eriksson is affiliated as associate professor at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

My research is about biomarkers for vibraton-induced white fingers. I also work on assessing exposure to the respiratory irritant substance trichloramine in a bathhouse environment.

Bertil Forsberg

Bertil Forsberg is professor of Environmental Medicine and head of Section of Sustainable Health at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

His research is mainly focusing on health effects from environmental risk factors and climate, but also respiratory health in the north. He is leader of the group from Umeå University that together with SMHI (Swedish Met Office) are partners in a research project named Arctic Community Resilience to Boreal Environmental change: Assessing Risks for fire and disease, starting 2020 after being funded in an international call (Belmont Forum) where the research council Forte is funding the Swedish researchers. High latitude communities need ways to address the consequences of an increase in temperatures and heat extremes causing rapid changes and risks to human health related to changes in landscape fire activity and associated air quality degradation, and natural-focal disease occurrence. The project will make projections of how changes will respond and interact under a range of climate and urban development scenarios.

Hanne Krage Carlsen

Hanna Krage Carlsen is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the Section of Sustainable Health.

She does research on air pollution from traffic and how it affects health.

Staffan Lundstedt

Staffan Lundstedt is Affiliated to the Department of Medical Biosciences.

He has previously done research on soil remediation in cold climates.

Gunnar Nordberg

Gunnar Nordberg does research at the unit for Working environment medicine since 1979, about the toxicology and epidemiology of metals as well as indoor pollutants (trichloramine).

I am interested in energy and health i.e. the risks of negative health consequences of different energy systems. An Arctic dimension of my research has been to look at the risks for human health in connection to pollutants from industry in Northern Sweden – amongst them the industrial area Rönnskärsverket.

Olle Nygren

Olle Nygren is Associate Professor and has been working at the Department of Chemistry for about 10 years. 

Before that, he worked for almost 30 years at National Institute for Working Life and its predecessors. Today, he is Environmental Coordinator at Dean’s Office at the Faculty of Medicine. Previously, Nygren’s arctic research was focused on development of simple and robust methods for monitoring chemical exposure in, e.g., cold climates. Today the research with arctic perspective is focused exchange of persistent and toxic chemicals between sea and air, mainly in the Bothnic Gulf. Preferably, natural brominated compounds formed by algae and other marine organisms, but also antropogenic similar brominated compounds. Here, he collaborate with Professor Terry Bidleman.

Anna Oudin

Anna Oudin is an epidemiologist and statistician. 

Her research concerns how polluted air and other environmental factors can affect the brain, e.g. the risk of getting dementia or suffering from mental illness. The composition and content of air pollution differ between different areas, and it is therefore important that research is also conducted in Arctic areas.

Erik Steinvall

Erik Steinvall is affiliated as research student at Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

He is involved in TEC-Lab (Thermochemical Energy Conversion Laboratory) which researches thermochemical energy conversion, mainly focusing on biomass but also on other solid and liquid fuels.

Mats Tysklind

My research is focused on the environmental behaviour of legacy and new emerging persistent organic pollutants (POPs). 

Special interest in studies in soil and water systems and to explore the possibility to connect inherent physicochemical properties to transport, transformation and biological uptake processes. In addition, research on fundamental processes of relevance for development of new environmental technologies for contaminated soil and water. Examples of studied classes of contaminants are; dioxins, pharmaceuticals and biocides.

Maria Wennberg

Maria Wennberg is a clinical dietitian with a PhD in environmental medicine. She works at Sustainable Health/ Nutritional Research at Public Health and [...]

Clinical Medicine, Umeå University and in Primary health care in Västerbotten.

My research is on the association between diet and/or environmental pollutants and health, mainly cardiovascular disease and diabetes type 2. The large dataset within Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS), where information has been collected since the middle of the 1980ties is the base for most of the research I am involved in. NSHDS contribute information on the situation in northern Sweden in arctic collaborations, for example Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), where I participate as expert for Sweden within the Human Health Assessment Group (HHAG). HHAG focus on the situation for the arctic populations concerning exposure to environmental pollutants, and this exposure is mainly through food.

Reindeer herding

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Christine Godeau

My research interest are interdisciplinary.

Focused on land use change driven by green energy transition, reindeer herding and indigenous- and gender perspectives.

Göran Bostedt

Senior lecturer in economics, at the Umeå School of Business and Economics, USBE, and associate professor in resource economics at the Dept. of Forest Economics, SLU.

Also part-time research leader at Várdduo, Umeå University’s center for Sami research. Active at CERE, the Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, which consists of researchers from both SLU and Umeå University.

Research interests include natural resource conflicts in arctic environments, with focus on the conflict between forestry and reindeer husbandry. Another strain of research has been conflicts from growing carnivore populations, where my research has been focused both on costs for livestock owners, non-market benefits of these carnivore populations, and the Swedish system for compensations for carnivore damages, where the latter can be seen as a variant of a PES (Payments for Environmental Services) system. I have also done work on transaction costs in the mandatory consultations between reindeer husbandry and forestry representatives. My research on policy analysis also extends to spatial planning of forest landscapes to promote a more sustainable and diverse management of forests.

Carina Keskitalo

E. Carina H. Keskitalo is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden.

Her work has focused on the politics of the development of the Arctic as an international region, and on environmental policy and climate change adaptation in a comparative context. Keskitalo was the research coordinator for Sweden's first Arctic social sciences and humanities research programme, the Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development programme, and for the PLURAL programme on the changing forest owner role.

Soil

Richard Bindler

Our research within the paleolimnological group is focused on analysis of climate- and environmental changes and their causes, with a focus on the human effects of human activities.

Our studies of longitudinal environmental changes are based foremostly on analysis of natural environmental archives like sea bottom sediment and peat bogs.

Many of today’s environmental issues, such as acidification and eutrofication of lakes, accumulation of heavy metals in terrestrial and aquatic eco systems as well as climate change are not spontaneous events caused only by industrialization in modern time, but are instead usually an effect of disturbances over a long period. The state of contemporary terrestrial and aquatic eco systems and the environment in general cannot truly be understood if knowledge of the historical development up until today isn’t included. Paleoecological studies are important to make us understand the extent and degree of environmental- and climate changes in the modern world. To judge the effects of human activities on the eco systems and the global climate it is necessary to develop and understanding of the natural variation within these systems.

Ellen Dorrepaal

My research focuses on how plants interact with their surrounding abiotic and biotic environment and how this impacts the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to land and vice versa.

Plants are the primary producers of organic carbon molecules and in the arctic, these molecules can remain in the ecosystem for centuries to millennia, due to the low activity of decomposing organisms in the harsh climate. As a consequence, plant activities have reduced the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere considerably, and caused 'climate cooling'. However, climate warming is occurring most strongly at northern high latitudes, which means that both plant productivity and microbial decomposition processes in the arctic may be accelerated. Whether this will cause a net release of CO2 from the ecosystem to the atmosphere or vice versa is a strongly debated topic and in my research group we focus on understanding the responses of the underlying controlling mechanisms.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment.

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Gesche Blume-Werry

I am an ecosystem ecologist with a passion for high latitude ecosystems and interested in the interplay of plants and their environment. 

My work in arctic tundra and temperate peatlands focuses on belowground plant processes, such as root phenology and root production, and often includes measurements outside of the growing season.

Reiner Giesler

My research focus on biogeochemical processes in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with special emphasis climate change effects in Arctic environments. 

In an on-going project, we integrate spatial and temporal variation in stream and soil biogeochemical processes to generate knowledge that can be used to better understand how aquatic ecosystems are linked to the terrestrial environment and their potential response to climate change. We focus on catchments with upland soils; these tundra soils are relatively well-drained and often subjected to physical motion induced by frost processes (cryoturbation) and permafrost. A special interest is the influence of weathering as a source of dissolved inorganic carbon in high-latitude streams. Part of my research is focused on phosphorus (P) dynamics across boreal and arctic landscape gradients with special focus on organic phosphorus. Specifically, I am interested on how P availability may change with the on-going climate induced changes in tundra landscapes.

Philip Jerand

My research focus on prehistoric and historic Sámi settlements situated in northern Norway and Sweden, on different altitudes and in dissimilar environments.

From the woodland valley of River Pasvik in the taiga zone of northern Norway, to the mountainous region of Tärna in Västerbotten county, Sweden. I use a multiproxy approach comprising chemical, physical and spectral analyses of soils and sediments, such as phosphate analysis, magnetic susceptibility, loss on ignition, NIR and Raman spectroscopy, together with archaeological remains and ethnographic accounts in order to examine questions of spatial use, methodology, modelling and ethno-archaeology.

Natuschka Lee

The purpose is to explore the microbial diversity in different natural or antrophogenic ecosystems, such as [...]

aquatic (lakes, wastewater treatment plants) and terrestrial systems (soil, sediments, including association to organisms like plants), above or below ground. The purpose is to explore the unknown, novel biodiversity and their role in these ecosystems, since so far only a fraction (about 1 %) of the total microbial biodiversity is known on our planet. The microbial biodiversity of cold climate ecosystems is of significant interest since recent studies on permafrost ecosystems in e.g. America/Canada or in Siberia have revealed a whole range of novel, unknown microorganisms. Similar studies have so far not been performed in Northern Sweden (to my knowledge at the present date).

Staffan Lundstedt

Staffan Lundstedt is Affiliated to the Department of Medical Biosciences.

He has previously done research on soil remediation in cold climates.

Mats Tysklind

My research is focused on the environmental behaviour of legacy and new emerging persistent organic pollutants (POPs). 

Special interest in studies in soil and water systems and to explore the possibility to connect inherent physicochemical properties to transport, transformation and biological uptake processes. In addition, research on fundamental processes of relevance for development of new environmental technologies for contaminated soil and water. Examples of studied classes of contaminants are; dioxins, pharmaceuticals and biocides.

Wildlife management

Göran Bostedt

Senior lecturer in economics, at the Umeå School of Business and Economics, USBE, and associate professor in resource economics at the Dept. of Forest Economics, SLU.

Also part-time research leader at Várdduo, Umeå University’s center for Sami research. Active at CERE, the Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, which consists of researchers from both SLU and Umeå University.

Research interests include natural resource conflicts in arctic environments, with focus on the conflict between forestry and reindeer husbandry. Another strain of research has been conflicts from growing carnivore populations, where my research has been focused both on costs for livestock owners, non-market benefits of these carnivore populations, and the Swedish system for compensations for carnivore damages, where the latter can be seen as a variant of a PES (Payments for Environmental Services) system. I have also done work on transaction costs in the mandatory consultations between reindeer husbandry and forestry representatives. My research on policy analysis also extends to spatial planning of forest landscapes to promote a more sustainable and diverse management of forests.

Camilla Sandström

Camilla Sandström is Professor at the Department of Political Science.

Her research areas include wildlife management, environmental governance, resource conflict with Sámi perspectives and forestry policies.

Space

Urban Brändström

Urban Brändström is affiliated as research fellow at Department of Physics.

He works at the Institute for Space Physics (IRF), in Kiruna, where he amongst other things does rocket science.

Maria Hamrin

Maria Hamrin, docent in space physics, works at the Department of Physics.

One of her main research interests concerns energy conversion processes between the space plasma and the electromagnetic fields in the terrestrial bow shock and magnetotail, and furthermore how the energy can be transferred to the polar region where they can cause auroras (northern lights).

Carol Norberg

Carol Norberg is associate professor in space physics. She works for the Department of Physics, and the Department of Space Physics in Kiruna.

She is interested in radiation from space and how it affects life on Earth as well as space travellers. Carol is responsible for the course Arctic science, a popular course on a basic level which includes the physics of aurora borealis, ice crystals and avalanches, as well as a presentation on how climate change affects the Arctic.