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Geopolitics & Economy

Here you find a number of different areas with associated researchers who in different ways are engaged in research about geopolitics & economy in the Arctic.

Business industries

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Economic history

Mats-Olov Olsson

Mats-Olof Olsson is associated to the Centre for Regional Science at Umeå University.

He has amongst other things written the historical books Encyclopedia of the Barents Region, together with Fredrik Backman and Björn Norlin.

Entrepreneurship

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Timotheus Kampik

Timotheus Kampik is PhD Student at the Department of Computing Science, Interactive Intelligent Systems Group. 

Interests: multi-agent systems, persuasive technologies, socio-technical systems.

Norbert Steigenberger

I did research on in other empirical settings and would now like to use the Arctic background to [...]

 

 

I am a researcher in entrepreneurship and plan to do research on how the material environment (where an entrepreneur lives, how his/her workplace looks like and so on) shapes risk perception, decision-making, opportunity perception, sensemaking and identity.

I did research on sensemaking, decision-making, materiality and related fields in other empirical settings and would now like to use the Arctic background to develop entrepreneurship research, which has largely ignored the embodiment perspective, in that regard.

I have so far no ongoing research in that regard, it's something I plan to do if the "arctic" community shares my impression that this topic is interesting.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Lars Silver

I am interested in how people and organizations handle issues such as logistics, entrepreneurship and recruitment in peripheral locations. 

One of the primary interests is whether an adverse location in terms of centrality influences growth of businesses.

Globalization

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Carina Keskitalo

E. Carina H. Keskitalo is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden.

Her work has focused on the politics of the development of the Arctic as an international region, and on environmental policy and climate change adaptation in a comparative context. Keskitalo was the research coordinator for Sweden's first Arctic social sciences and humanities research programme, the Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development programme, and for the PLURAL programme on the changing forest owner role.

Venkata Krishna Kumar Upadhyayula

Krishna Kumar is an assistant professor at Department of Chemistry.

Krishna is part of the SRI-platform (Sustainable Resources and Innovation Platform) which works with system-analysis in questions of sustainability and land use.

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

International relations

Niklas Eklund

Niklas Eklund is Associate professor at Department of Political Science  and vice director of the Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.

He does research about Arctic security questions, international relations, leadership and governance.

Carina Keskitalo

E. Carina H. Keskitalo is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden.

Her work has focused on the politics of the development of the Arctic as an international region, and on environmental policy and climate change adaptation in a comparative context. Keskitalo was the research coordinator for Sweden's first Arctic social sciences and humanities research programme, the Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development programme, and for the PLURAL programme on the changing forest owner role.

Douglas Nord

Douglas Nord is associated as guest professor to the Department of Political Science. 

Douglas has for many years worked with the Arctic Council, and is currently writing a book about the Arctic Council.

Political ecology

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Resource economics

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Göran Bostedt

Senior lecturer in economics, at the Umeå School of Business and Economics, USBE, and associate professor in resource economics at the Dept. of Forest Economics, SLU.

Also part-time research leader at Várdduo, Umeå University’s center for Sami research. Active at CERE, the Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, which consists of researchers from both SLU and Umeå University.

Research interests include natural resource conflicts in arctic environments, with focus on the conflict between forestry and reindeer husbandry. Another strain of research has been conflicts from growing carnivore populations, where my research has been focused both on costs for livestock owners, non-market benefits of these carnivore populations, and the Swedish system for compensations for carnivore damages, where the latter can be seen as a variant of a PES (Payments for Environmental Services) system. I have also done work on transaction costs in the mandatory consultations between reindeer husbandry and forestry representatives. My research on policy analysis also extends to spatial planning of forest landscapes to promote a more sustainable and diverse management of forests.

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Rural development

Therese Bjärstig

Therese Bjärstig is associate Professor in Political science and researches natural resource- and environmental governance, foremostly connected to sparsely populated- and rural areas in the Arctic.

She focuses on different forms of cooperation and collaboration between different business interests and actors with the purpose of reaching sustainable solutions. The conditions for this emanate from tools like planning and participation. Her research takes place mostly in the forestry sector, with ongoing studies on key biotopes and multi-use. Other themes in her research is the social value of forests, winder power, municipal planning, rural development, innovation within the farming sector, equality within wildlife management and follow up studies/evaluations within several of these areas. Therese has in many of her projects worked both cross-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary with researchers from other scientific disciplines, and also in close collaborations with practitioners and stakeholders.

Doris Carson

Doris A. Carson is a researcher at the Department of Geography. She is interested in the socio-economic futures of small rural villages and communities in sparsely populated peripheries [...]

, including those commonly found in the inland north of Sweden, as well as the Outback north of Australia. Her research focuses primarily on three broad streams: 1) the processes that hinder or facilitate a transition from ‘extractive’ to ‘attractive’ industries (particularly tourism); 2) the role of mobile and temporary populations in stimulating new development and innovation; and 3) the interplay between urbanisation, mobility and socio-economic change in sparsely populated areas. The latter is primarily focusing on the impacts that growing cities in the north have had on development opportunities in their more sparsely populated hinterlands. Issues around urbanisation and urban-rural divides have become increasingly prominent in the Arctic. Ongoing comparative research in other resource peripheries, most notably in northern Australia, will help identify if there are particular ‘Arctic’ dimensions to such changing urban-rural development relationships.

Dorothee Bohn

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the [...]

 

I am a part of the research project “Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context”.

This research initiative analyses how local and regional government, industry and community stakeholders in Arctic Sweden tackle challenges and opportunities related to tourism, globalization and climate change and what future development they aspire.

In my PhD thesis, I focus on multi-scalar tourism governance and regional development in the European Arctic. I am particularly interested in the spatial and social outcomes of EU funding policies in the region.  

Carina Keskitalo

E. Carina H. Keskitalo is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden.

Her work has focused on the politics of the development of the Arctic as an international region, and on environmental policy and climate change adaptation in a comparative context. Keskitalo was the research coordinator for Sweden's first Arctic social sciences and humanities research programme, the Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development programme, and for the PLURAL programme on the changing forest owner role.

Dieter Müller

Dieter is professor of human geography and does research on tourism. Besides a longstanding interest for cottages and second homes, he is engaged in research on tourism in northern areas.

He has led several major research projects on tourism and regional development in the North that resulted in several books, book chapters and articles on the subject. They address destination development, nature-based tourism and regional development in Northern Sweden. Particularly the interaction between tourism and other activities has been of particular interest in this context. Dieter has also worked extensively on Sami tourism. Today, he is not least interest in the Arctification of tourism in Northern Europe, i.e. the fact that tourism in the region is increasingly being marketed as Arctic, and its consequences for communities in the North. Dieter is involved in the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) and he is Chairman of the Board of Arcum, too.

Gerd Pettersson

My primary research interest is special education activity which is run through close-to-practice studies in rural schools

These rural schools which I have an interest in my research are found within the rural areas of northern Sweden, thereby the Arctic dimension. In these areas the demographic conditions are changing steadily, i.a. due to the ongoing urbanization. Less families in rural areas often contribute to how policy-makers make decisions on closing schools, resulting in that students need to take long, demanding bus trips to a different school, often far away from home. Against this background my interest in research- and development work within distance learning has grown, because distance learning could be an alternative to the shutdown of schools.

Örjan Pettersson

Örjan Pettersson is associate professor at the Department of Geography.

He researches, amongst other things, tourism, rural societies, forestry and land use.

Elsa Reimerson

I am a teacher and researcher in political science with a particular focus on environmental politics, conservation, and Indigenous peoples in the Sámi and Nordic parts of the Arctic.

My PhD thesis explored Indigenous peoples' space for political agency in the governance and management of protected areas, with a particular focus on Sápmi on the Swedish and Norwegian sides. 2018-2021 I primarily work within the research project Bring down the sky to the earth: how to use forests to open up for constructive climate change pathways in local contexts, an interdisciplinary collaborative project that aims to explore ways to make anthropogenic climate change relevant for people in urban and rural contexts, enable development of optional pathways, and develop measures tailored to face climate change challenges on local levels.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.

Malin Rönnblom

Malin Rönnblom is Associate professor at Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).

My research focuses on new forms of governing in a post-political era, critical policy analysis, especially gender equality and regional growth policies, as well as and rural and urban studies.

Lars Silver

I am interested in how people and organizations handle issues such as logistics, entrepreneurship and recruitment in peripheral locations. 

One of the primary interests is whether an adverse location in terms of centrality influences growth of businesses.

Anna Zachrisson

Anna studies natural resource- and environmental governance, particularly connected to sparesly populated and rural areas in the Arctic.

She focuses on conflic situations where different business interests and agents have different interests, and how these can be handled on different administrative levels with the help of different governance forms, to contribute to sustainable development. Governance is about, for an example planning, cooperative governance and participation. Thematically her research encompasses mining, wind power, tourism, environmental care and ecological restoration, and to some degree farming and hunting. Anna works firstly and foremost in cross- and transdisciplinary research projects where scientists of different disciplines cooperate close to the affected agents.

Styrning handlar om t ex planering, samförvaltning och deltagande. Tematiskt omfattar hennes forskning gruvbrytning, vindkraft, turism, naturvård och ekologisk restaurering samt i viss mån jordbruk och jakt. Anna arbetar framför allt i tvär- och transdisciplinära forskningsprojekt där forskare från olika discipliner samarbetar nära med olika aktörer

Rural development

Niklas Eklund

Niklas Eklund is Associate professor at Department of Political Science  and vice director of the Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.

He does research about Arctic security questions, international relations, leadership and governance.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Robert O. Nilsson

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly [...]

 

Robert O. Nilsson is a doctoral student at the Department of Geography at Umeå University, and is also a doctoral student representative on Arcum's board.

Robert participates in the research project 'Climate Change and the Double Amplification of Arctic Tourism: Challenges and Potential Solutions for Tourism and Sustainable Development in an Arctic Context'.

Robert's doctoral dissertation focuses on the development of 'Arctic' tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. In this context, words related to the Arctic are increasingly used by tourism entrepreneurs to name and describe their companies, products and services. Robert's research questions are about how this 'Arctification' process and our language use change our perceptions and images about the Arctic's borders and its content, as well as how language use affect our societal structures. Especially in the Arctic context where global discourses on globalization and climate change collide with local practices, traditions and narratives.