Skip to content
printicon
Main menu hidden.

Health & Well-being

Here you find a number of different areas with associated researchers who in different ways are engaged in research about health and well-being in the Arctic, and in Arctic environments.

Accidents

Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Lina Gyllencreutz

Lina Gyllencreutz is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research mostly on accidents and crisis medicine, especially involving children, and elderly in outdoors environments.

Johan Hylander

My area of interest is disaster medicine. Especially medical management in tunnel-incidents. 

Road tunnel Incidents has the potential of being catastrophic, as shown by the vehicle fires of the Mount Blanc and St. Gotthard tunnels.  My research is focused on collaboration and coordination with the emergency services and tunnel owners. As  I am soon done with my medical studies and have a background in the emergency medical services, prehospital medical care is one of my special interests, especially in the cold nordic climate. 

Sofia Karlsson

Within my thesis project I study the Swedish crisis medicine preparedness for large accidents in underground mines.

In Sweden, the nine Swedish underground mines are localized to the northern and middle parts of the country. The mines’ subarctic geographical location means that there is a limited amount of available emergency response units, as well as relatively long travel times in cold climates.

All three organizations (mine, emergency response and ambulance) play a major part in the implementation of the rescue scenario. A scenario below ground means long, dark, cold and often moist environments, where emergency personnel need to navigate an environment which is tough to overview. The mining crews have knowledge of the inaccessible environment as well access to resources which are needed in these scenarios. Emergency personnel can perform carry through the rescue below ground in collaboration with the mining crews, with paramedics taking care of the injured. Collaboration is thereby a leading word of my thesis project.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Maud Stenberg

My research is about rehabilitation after traumatic brain damage in northern Sweden, especially [...]

severe traumatic brain damage, i.e. the persons who have suffered a traumatic skull injury and are unconscious when they arrive at the hospital.

In this part of the country there are special circumstances for immediate care considering the arctic environment, but also the possibilities for later state rehabilition measures where there occurs different needs between urban and rural areas. There are also special needs for the indigenous populance, the Sami rehabilition process, which aren't always met. Recovery and rehabilition within this patient group varies, and today there are no guidelines for the later care process, as there is of the immediate care. Those who are affected and their families lack any form of cooperation between different agents during their rehabilitions process and for those with more severe long term conditions there is a need for follow up process, of which there is none today. The family perspective is also important as a brain injury also affects the family and this is part of my ongoing work, as well as light traumatic brain damage/commotio.

Exposure

Jonas Alex

I work with research and development, as well as the specialist education, on ambulance healthcare. I am an expert within:

  • Thermic comfort
  • Hypothermia
  • Prehospital patient safety
  • Police emergency healthcare
  • Crisis medicine
Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Ronnie Lundström

Ronne Lundström is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, and engaged in [...]

the project ”Cold and Health in Northern Sweden" (CHINS) which investigates health in relation to a cold working environment and vibrating tools.

Tohr Nilsson

Tohr Nilsson is associate professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about hand-arm injuries caused from using vibrating/shaking tools in cold environments.

Hans Pettersson

Hans Pettersson is a researcher at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section of Sustainable Health. He says the following about his research:

The goal with my research is to improve work environment and health amongst workers. Above all I work with work environments in building- and mining industries but also other industries in northern Sweden. A lot of workers in these industries work and live in a sub-arctic climate with long and cold winters. I research how work environment in cold climates affect worker’s health and how work environment can be reformed so that health issues can be avoided. Focus within my field of research about work in a cold environment has been how sense of touch and blood circulation in hands and fingers can become more impaired in a cold climate amongst workers who are subjected to vibrations from hand-held vibrating machines such as chainsaws, sanding machines and jackhammers. Further, I study how noise and work in a cold climate amongst building workers can increase the risk for heart-disease.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Rita Sjöström

Rita Sjöström is adjunct associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

The Arctic dimensions of her research includes research on tuberculosis, how cold affects health, as well as exercise in cold environments.

Nikolai Stenfors

Nikolai works at the Department of Public Health & Clinical Medicine. He says the following about his research:

My research program "Cold, physical activity and respiratory systems" studies the connection between physical activity in cold environments and respiratory health. The long term goal is to improve diagnostics, treatment and prevention of cold-related respiratory problems within the populance. The research program consists of poll inquiries, clinical patient studies and experimental studies in a cold environment chamber.

Albin Stjernbrandt

My research project aims to describe how the working population in northern Sweden is exposed to cold, using an epidemiological approach. I want to investigate if there is [...]

a link between high exposure to ambient cold and different health outcomes. I primarily study how the vascular and neural function of the hands is affected by cold exposure. Also, I want to see if there are other factors contributing to the outcomes, such as tobacco use, high exposure to hand-arm vibration, hereditary factors, or certain diseases.

The project also includes laboratory studies on volunteers. In these experiments, we investigate the vascular and neural function of the hands using various methods with high precision, including thermal quantitative sensory testing and laser Doppler flow measurements. One of the purposes of the studies is to determine whether there are disturbances in the regulation of the blood flow in the skin of subjects who experience cold sensitivity or Raynaud's phenomenon.

The research has an arctic approach since we investigate the exposure patterns of people living in a subarctic climate. Previous research has shown that some populations in these areas, such as the Sámi and Inuits, have particularly good cold adaptation capabilities. In our studies, we seek to understand these mechanisms in greater detail.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Bin Yang

Bing Yang is affiliated as professor at Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

Bin researches thermic comfort in subarctic areas.

Disabilities

Catharina Henje

Catharina Hejne is a lecturer at the Umeå Institute of Design (UID).

She does research on adaptive design to improve public spaces for people living with disabilities.

Erling Häggström Lundevaller

I am a statistician working at the Centre for Demographic and Aging Research (CEDAR) and the Statistics Department and also affiliated with Stockholm University's demographic unit, SUDA.

My research interests mainly relate to different demographic issues. One of these is the impact of climate on mortality, with special attention being paid to differences between different groups, for example between Sami and the rest of the population.


Another research focus is what effect disability has had on individuals' life trajectories both in historical and modern times and how other factors such as gender and social group influence the effect.


Another focus is the influence of genetics on demographic processes where I studied the effects of the blood group Rh- and inbreeding.
As statistical tools, I use methods that enable analysis from a system perspective such as micro simulation and sequence analysis. These methods can often illustrate problems in a more realistic way.


In my research I use both historical data from parish records and modern data from registers that illustrate living conditions and health. Sweden's unique historical data can provide an insight into what life was like in the past.

Crisis medicine

Jonas Alex

I work with research and development, as well as the specialist education, on ambulance healthcare. I am an expert within:

  • Thermic comfort
  • Hypothermia
  • Prehospital patient safety
  • Police emergency healthcare
  • Crisis medicine
Lina Gyllencreutz

Lina Gyllencreutz is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research mostly on accidents and crisis medicine, especially involving children, and elderly in outdoors environments.

Michael Haney

Michael Haney is head of the unit for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.

He has foremostly done research on crisis medicine and emergency response care.

Johan Hylander

My area of interest is disaster medicine. Especially medical management in tunnel-incidents. 

Road tunnel Incidents has the potential of being catastrophic, as shown by the vehicle fires of the Mount Blanc and St. Gotthard tunnels.  My research is focused on collaboration and coordination with the emergency services and tunnel owners. As  I am soon done with my medical studies and have a background in the emergency medical services, prehospital medical care is one of my special interests, especially in the cold nordic climate. 

Disease

Clas Ahlm

Clas Ahlm is professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

He does research on infectious diseases, for example viruses' which are spread through mosquitos in the Arctic area.

Sven Bergström

Sven Bergström is professor at Department of Molecular Biology.

Amongst other things, he researches Northern infectious disease and parasitic diseases, which are spread through mosquitos and ticks.

Stina Bodén

Stina Bodén is a postgraduate student at the Department of Radiation Sciences, the unit for oncology. She says the following about her research:

In my postgraduate project I study the inflammatory effect of nutritional intake amongst individuals in northern Sweden in relation to the risk of getting cancer, in particular colon cancer. We use poll data and blood tests from participants in Norra Sveriges Hälsoundersökningar (VIP and MONICA) to examine these connections.

Fredrik Elgh

Fredrik Elgh is a Professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

My research is about the herpes virus and it's role in the development of Alzheimers disease. Earlier research includes viral zoonosis' - that is, virus diseases which spread between animals and humans, as well as the role of the Flu virus throughout history.

Mats Eliasson

Mats Eliasson is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Senior counsultant at the Medical Department, Sunderby Hospital.

My research is about the presence of myocardial infarction and stroke in the Norrbotten and Västerbotten regions. The past few years we have analyzed the levels of D-vitamin in the population, with the idea that we who live far in the north with long periods of darkness during the year possibly could have lower levels of D-vitamin. However, our first results showed that D-vitamin deficiency was rare even during winter. Together with Dr. Viktor Oskarsson in Piteå we are broadening these analyzes to compare our data with other regions in Europe. We also study change over time for the male hormone testosterone, where international reports are describing falling levels over time among adult men.

Magnus Evander

Research on zoonotic virus diseases. Viruses that are transmitted from vectors (e.g. mosquitoes, ticks) or mammals (e.g. voles) to humans and cause disease.

An Arctic in climate change affects the ecology and thus also the vectors and animals that carry the virus. The mosquito-borne viral disease “Ockelbo disease” has spread to the north in Sweden and the vole-borne viral disease nephropatia epidemica has spread to new areas in Sweden. We investigate transmission, pathogenesis, spread, vector competence, etc. of virus, vectors and reservoirs in relation to ecology.

Birgitta Evengård

Birgitta Evengård is professor and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Microbiology and head of the unit for Infecious diseases.

Climate change will have a profound and rapid impact on the human biome. As climate change occurs at the fastest speed and also with the highest impact in the North this perspective is a rewarding one to study. The human biome in the Norths includes the change in the flora and fauna, all transforming the pretexts for development of societies in the North. A holistic approach including collaboration with many scholars is necessary.

Karin Hellström Ängerud

Karin Hällström Ängerud is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research primarily on cardiovascular disease and mortality.

Jing Helmersson

Jing is a modeller in public health and a physicist with two PhDs, one in Public Health (Umeå University 2018) and one in Physics (University of Michigan 1989).

Jing has published 76 scientific articles in physics and public health. Her current research is comparison between Sámi Traditional Healing with Traditional Chinese Medicine - literature review and interview study. Her main research interests are Arctic well-being with focus on integration of scientific research with traditional knowledge/practices of Indigenous people.

Her previous research in public health was to study the relationship between climate change and health. She developed mathematical models for vector-borne disease (dengue) and Aedes mosquitoes, and their future projections under various climate change scenarios to support climate mitigation. She was born in China and lived in USA for 20 years before moving to Sweden in 2004. Jing was formerly a professor in Physics from California State University Long Beach with over 20 years of physics research in quantum optics and soft condensed matter physics - magnetorheological fluids. She also has experience in Chinese medicine in the area of disease prevention and lifestyle consultation. In addition, she gives public lecturer/workshops on promoting well-being from body, mind and spirit.

Beatrice Melin

Beatrice Melin is professor in Molecular epidemiology of cancer, at the Department of Radiation Sciences.

Some cancer sites are aggregated in families in the Northern region of Sweden. Our aim is to identify the etiological causes to these types of cancer including among other whole genome sequencing.  My research focus is on glioma a malignant brain tumor but I also study hematological diseases and colorectal cancer. By using cases and controls from a very defined arctic population that have specific gene pool we hope to understand the causes of cancer. 

Ulf Nilsson

Ulf Nilsson is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the  section of Medicine.

He researches, amongst other things, cardiovascular health, obesity and mortality.

Monika Norberg

Monika Norberg is lecturer at the Department of Nursing.

Her research is about breast cancer survivorship and the genered discourse surrounding the subject.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Olena Rzhepishevska

I am a microbiologist/molecular biologist. I am affiliated research fellow at the Clinical Microbiology Department and work as a senior research engineer at the Chemistry Department, UmU.

My PhD project was about metabolism of acidophilic & psychrophilic (acid & clod-loving) bacteria from Arctic environments.

Now I work with several projects using metabolomics for biomarker research in infectious diseases, understanding of mixed bacterial biofilms in clinical and biotechnological settings, effect of antibiotics and some other. Here you can see most of my scientific publications.

I am very interested in tuberculosis (TB): drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and biomarkers of TB in human. TB is not only a biomedical issue but also a complex social phenomenon. In 2016, I joined TBnet, a European network of clinical researchers who work with TB. In TBnet I am responsible for Advocacy.

In Arctic countries and in Eastern Europe (with Russia being both Arctic & Eastern European country) TB is still very prevalent and access to healthcare and its quality is still an issue. By my research, I try to improve diagnostic and treatment and advocate for more support to people and countries affected by TB. In Umea, I am a co-organizer of Arctic Meetings on Clinical TB.

Anders Sjöstedt

Tularemia, a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, has been endemic in certain areas of northern Sweden for almost a century and it has [...]

emerged in areas of middle Sweden during the past decades. In 2019, more than 1,000 individuals were diagnosed with tularemia in Sweden. The disease is especially prevalent in late summer and autumn.

We hypothesize that the predominant spread of F. tularensis in Sweden is through mosquitoes and that they acquire the bacteria in the water. In view of the specific association between outbreaks and meteorological and hydrological variables, it is very likely that future occurrences of tularemia will be affected by climate change and our preliminary predictions demonstrate that there will an increased incidence of tularemia in several areas of Sweden, in particular in the Arctic areas.

Tularemia is a significant health threat in endemic regions, but there are no methods to forecast an outbreak. Therefore, one of our aims is to develop at prognostic model, so health authorities could be alerted for an increased risk of an outbreak. We are specifically investigating putative risk factors in Norrbotten in order to improve the prognostic models. We are also investigating what the impact of future climate change will be. 

Nikolai Stenfors

Nikolai works at the Department of Public Health & Clinical Medicine. He says the following about his research:

My research program "Cold, physical activity and respiratory systems" studies the connection between physical activity in cold environments and respiratory health. The long term goal is to improve diagnostics, treatment and prevention of cold-related respiratory problems within the populance. The research program consists of poll inquiries, clinical patient studies and experimental studies in a cold environment chamber.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Olivia Wesula Luande

I am currently undertaking research on mosquito-borne zoonoses in humans and animals in the Arctic region with an aim of [...]

determining the abundance and distribution of diverse mosquito species by means of high-throughput genetic characterization; determining the occurrence and genetic diversity of mosquito-borne viruses; development of a model for mosquito vector competence for mosquito-borne viruses.

Environmental health

Ingvar Bergdahl

Long-lasting pollutants with a potential to affect human health is my main Arctic research focus.

Examples are PCB, DDT, and lead. I combine this with my other professional role, working with the biobank samples from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study, that holds blood samples from well over 100,000 individuals. These are later followed up and we can compare individuals who later got a certain disease with others. Previous studies concern for example: mercury and myocardial infarction; cadmium and fractures; and lead and kidney failure. Currently we study PCB, DDT, and other persistent organic pollutants in relation to diabetes.

Birgitta Evengård

Birgitta Evengård is professor and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Microbiology and head of the unit for Infecious diseases.

Climate change will have a profound and rapid impact on the human biome. As climate change occurs at the fastest speed and also with the highest impact in the North this perspective is a rewarding one to study. The human biome in the Norths includes the change in the flora and fauna, all transforming the pretexts for development of societies in the North. A holistic approach including collaboration with many scholars is necessary.

Bertil Forsberg

Bertil Forsberg is professor of Environmental Medicine and head of Section of Sustainable Health at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

His research is mainly focusing on health effects from environmental risk factors and climate, but also respiratory health in the north. He is leader of the group from Umeå University that together with SMHI (Swedish Met Office) are partners in a research project named Arctic Community Resilience to Boreal Environmental change: Assessing Risks for fire and disease, starting 2020 after being funded in an international call (Belmont Forum) where the research council Forte is funding the Swedish researchers. High latitude communities need ways to address the consequences of an increase in temperatures and heat extremes causing rapid changes and risks to human health related to changes in landscape fire activity and associated air quality degradation, and natural-focal disease occurrence. The project will make projections of how changes will respond and interact under a range of climate and urban development scenarios.

Karl Forsell

My research is about work environment for seafarers. 

During last years, there has been an increase in the ship traffic through the Northeast passage between Europe and Asia made possible by decreasing ice in the Arctic. The work environment for seafarers operating the area is however poorly investigated.

Jing Helmersson

Jing is a modeller in public health and a physicist with two PhDs, one in Public Health (Umeå University 2018) and one in Physics (University of Michigan 1989).

Jing has published 76 scientific articles in physics and public health. Her current research is comparison between Sámi Traditional Healing with Traditional Chinese Medicine - literature review and interview study. Her main research interests are Arctic well-being with focus on integration of scientific research with traditional knowledge/practices of Indigenous people.

Her previous research in public health was to study the relationship between climate change and health. She developed mathematical models for vector-borne disease (dengue) and Aedes mosquitoes, and their future projections under various climate change scenarios to support climate mitigation. She was born in China and lived in USA for 20 years before moving to Sweden in 2004. Jing was formerly a professor in Physics from California State University Long Beach with over 20 years of physics research in quantum optics and soft condensed matter physics - magnetorheological fluids. She also has experience in Chinese medicine in the area of disease prevention and lifestyle consultation. In addition, she gives public lecturer/workshops on promoting well-being from body, mind and spirit.

Hanne Krage Carlsen

Hanna Krage Carlsen is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the Section of Sustainable Health.

She does research on air pollution from traffic and how it affects health.

Maria Nilsson

Maria Nilsson is research fellow at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

My research is in the field of climate change and health. My main interest is climate adaptation, climate communication and policy development.

Gunnar Nordberg

Gunnar Nordberg does research at the unit for Working environment medicine since 1979, about the toxicology and epidemiology of metals as well as indoor pollutants (trichloramine).

I am interested in energy and health i.e. the risks of negative health consequences of different energy systems. An Arctic dimension of my research has been to look at the risks for human health in connection to pollutants from industry in Northern Sweden – amongst them the industrial area Rönnskärsverket.

Anna Oudin

Anna Oudin is an epidemiologist and statistician. 

Her research concerns how polluted air and other environmental factors can affect the brain, e.g. the risk of getting dementia or suffering from mental illness. The composition and content of air pollution differ between different areas, and it is therefore important that research is also conducted in Arctic areas.

Joacim Rocklöv

Joacim Rocklöv is an epidemiologist and statistician. He does research at the intersection between the areas global health, environmental epidemiology and infection epidemiology.

He leads a research group which focuses on modelling the aethology of diseases, and the development of predictive models for early warning systems. He is also active in research which means to understand how future disease burdens are affected by a changed climate, grounded in climate scenarios.

Barbara Schumann

Associate Professor; PhD in epidemiology. Research focus on weather and climate change impacts on human health.

Ongoing studies on weather-related mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition, using historical population and weather records, and on the role of oppressive weather types on mortality and morbidity in contemporary and future Sweden.

Anders Sjöstedt

Tularemia, a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, has been endemic in certain areas of northern Sweden for almost a century and it has [...]

emerged in areas of middle Sweden during the past decades. In 2019, more than 1,000 individuals were diagnosed with tularemia in Sweden. The disease is especially prevalent in late summer and autumn.

We hypothesize that the predominant spread of F. tularensis in Sweden is through mosquitoes and that they acquire the bacteria in the water. In view of the specific association between outbreaks and meteorological and hydrological variables, it is very likely that future occurrences of tularemia will be affected by climate change and our preliminary predictions demonstrate that there will an increased incidence of tularemia in several areas of Sweden, in particular in the Arctic areas.

Tularemia is a significant health threat in endemic regions, but there are no methods to forecast an outbreak. Therefore, one of our aims is to develop at prognostic model, so health authorities could be alerted for an increased risk of an outbreak. We are specifically investigating putative risk factors in Norrbotten in order to improve the prognostic models. We are also investigating what the impact of future climate change will be. 

Maria Wennberg

Maria Wennberg is a clinical dietitian with a PhD in environmental medicine. She works at Sustainable Health/ Nutritional Research at Public Health and [...]

Clinical Medicine, Umeå University and in Primary health care in Västerbotten.

My research is on the association between diet and/or environmental pollutants and health, mainly cardiovascular disease and diabetes type 2. The large dataset within Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS), where information has been collected since the middle of the 1980ties is the base for most of the research I am involved in. NSHDS contribute information on the situation in northern Sweden in arctic collaborations, for example Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), where I participate as expert for Sweden within the Human Health Assessment Group (HHAG). HHAG focus on the situation for the arctic populations concerning exposure to environmental pollutants, and this exposure is mainly through food.

Olivia Wesula Luande

I am currently undertaking research on mosquito-borne zoonoses in humans and animals in the Arctic region with an aim of [...]

determining the abundance and distribution of diverse mosquito species by means of high-throughput genetic characterization; determining the occurrence and genetic diversity of mosquito-borne viruses; development of a model for mosquito vector competence for mosquito-borne viruses.

Bin Yang

Bing Yang is affiliated as professor at Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

Bin researches thermic comfort in subarctic areas.

Epidemiology

Per Axelsson

Together with Christina Storm Mienna I am leading the HALDI – project. The overall aim of the project is to establish a comprehensive understanding of [...]

the present health and living conditions for the adult population in Jokkmokk municipality, including the Sami population. Funding has been received from Wallenbergstiftelserna (MAW 2019-23) and the  Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (2018).

Sven Bergström

Sven Bergström is professor at Department of Molecular Biology.

Amongst other things, he researches Northern infectious disease and parasitic diseases, which are spread through mosquitos and ticks.

Stina Bodén

Stina Bodén is a postgraduate student at the Department of Radiation Sciences, the unit for oncology. She says the following about her research:

In my postgraduate project I study the inflammatory effect of nutritional intake amongst individuals in northern Sweden in relation to the risk of getting cancer, in particular colon cancer. We use poll data and blood tests from participants in Norra Sveriges Hälsoundersökningar (VIP and MONICA) to examine these connections.

Fredrik Elgh

Fredrik Elgh is a Professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

My research is about the herpes virus and it's role in the development of Alzheimers disease. Earlier research includes viral zoonosis' - that is, virus diseases which spread between animals and humans, as well as the role of the Flu virus throughout history.

Mats Eliasson

Mats Eliasson is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Senior counsultant at the Medical Department, Sunderby Hospital.

My research is about the presence of myocardial infarction and stroke in the Norrbotten and Västerbotten regions. The past few years we have analyzed the levels of D-vitamin in the population, with the idea that we who live far in the north with long periods of darkness during the year possibly could have lower levels of D-vitamin. However, our first results showed that D-vitamin deficiency was rare even during winter. Together with Dr. Viktor Oskarsson in Piteå we are broadening these analyzes to compare our data with other regions in Europe. We also study change over time for the male hormone testosterone, where international reports are describing falling levels over time among adult men.

Magnus Evander

Research on zoonotic virus diseases. Viruses that are transmitted from vectors (e.g. mosquitoes, ticks) or mammals (e.g. voles) to humans and cause disease.

An Arctic in climate change affects the ecology and thus also the vectors and animals that carry the virus. The mosquito-borne viral disease “Ockelbo disease” has spread to the north in Sweden and the vole-borne viral disease nephropatia epidemica has spread to new areas in Sweden. We investigate transmission, pathogenesis, spread, vector competence, etc. of virus, vectors and reservoirs in relation to ecology.

Maria Furberg

Maria Furberg is a physician at the infection clinic at Norrland’s University Hospital in Umeå.

She is a specialist in infectious disease and medicine and has a doctorate in epidemiology with a thesis about climate change and health with focus on northern Sweden.

I research if assumed climate sensitive zoonotic infections, first and foremost tularaemia (rabbit fever). Climate sensitive infections respect no boundaries, and surveillance and research around these diseases need to be done through international cooperation. In the Arctic Council group ICS – International Circumpolar Surveillance –, where I sit as Sweden’s representative in the steering group, as well as co-chair in the working group for climate sensitive infectious diseases, we share and compile data and information about select infections from the Arctic countries and regions. I have a particular interest in Arctic indigenous populations who are especially exposed to climate change and zoonotic infections, and in many Arctic countries are socially neglected groups.

Linnea Hedman

My name is Linnéa Hedman and I work as a researcher and project leader at the OLIN-studies in the Norrbotten region.

I am a behavioral scientist and associate professor in Epidemiology and Public health at Umeå University.

I primarily research teenage smoking - who starts to smoke, evaluation of tobacco preventive measures, and the connection between passive smoking and respiratory symptoms. I have also done research on the experience of people sick with chronic obstructive respiratory disease, who still cannot quit smoking. Beyond smoking, I have also done research on life quality amongst teens suffering from asthma.

Urban Janlert

Urban Janlert is professor emeritus of Public Health, specialist in Social Medicine. 

He does research in social epidemiology (unemployment, social deprivation).

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Anna Oudin

Anna Oudin is an epidemiologist and statistician. 

Her research concerns how polluted air and other environmental factors can affect the brain, e.g. the risk of getting dementia or suffering from mental illness. The composition and content of air pollution differ between different areas, and it is therefore important that research is also conducted in Arctic areas.

Joacim Rocklöv

Joacim Rocklöv is an epidemiologist and statistician. He does research at the intersection between the areas global health, environmental epidemiology and infection epidemiology.

He leads a research group which focuses on modelling the aethology of diseases, and the development of predictive models for early warning systems. He is also active in research which means to understand how future disease burdens are affected by a changed climate, grounded in climate scenarios.

Barbara Schumann

Associate Professor; PhD in epidemiology. Research focus on weather and climate change impacts on human health.

Ongoing studies on weather-related mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition, using historical population and weather records, and on the role of oppressive weather types on mortality and morbidity in contemporary and future Sweden.

Anders Sjöstedt

Tularemia, a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, has been endemic in certain areas of northern Sweden for almost a century and it has [...]

emerged in areas of middle Sweden during the past decades. In 2019, more than 1,000 individuals were diagnosed with tularemia in Sweden. The disease is especially prevalent in late summer and autumn.

We hypothesize that the predominant spread of F. tularensis in Sweden is through mosquitoes and that they acquire the bacteria in the water. In view of the specific association between outbreaks and meteorological and hydrological variables, it is very likely that future occurrences of tularemia will be affected by climate change and our preliminary predictions demonstrate that there will an increased incidence of tularemia in several areas of Sweden, in particular in the Arctic areas.

Tularemia is a significant health threat in endemic regions, but there are no methods to forecast an outbreak. Therefore, one of our aims is to develop at prognostic model, so health authorities could be alerted for an increased risk of an outbreak. We are specifically investigating putative risk factors in Norrbotten in order to improve the prognostic models. We are also investigating what the impact of future climate change will be. 

Health data

Bertil Forsberg

Bertil Forsberg is professor of Environmental Medicine and head of Section of Sustainable Health at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

His research is mainly focusing on health effects from environmental risk factors and climate, but also respiratory health in the north. He is leader of the group from Umeå University that together with SMHI (Swedish Met Office) are partners in a research project named Arctic Community Resilience to Boreal Environmental change: Assessing Risks for fire and disease, starting 2020 after being funded in an international call (Belmont Forum) where the research council Forte is funding the Swedish researchers. High latitude communities need ways to address the consequences of an increase in temperatures and heat extremes causing rapid changes and risks to human health related to changes in landscape fire activity and associated air quality degradation, and natural-focal disease occurrence. The project will make projections of how changes will respond and interact under a range of climate and urban development scenarios.

Linnea Hedman

My name is Linnéa Hedman and I work as a researcher and project leader at the OLIN-studies in the Norrbotten region.

I am a behavioral scientist and associate professor in Epidemiology and Public health at Umeå University.

I primarily research teenage smoking - who starts to smoke, evaluation of tobacco preventive measures, and the connection between passive smoking and respiratory symptoms. I have also done research on the experience of people sick with chronic obstructive respiratory disease, who still cannot quit smoking. Beyond smoking, I have also done research on life quality amongst teens suffering from asthma.

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Klas-Göran Sahlen

Klas-Göran Sahlen is Deputy head of the Department and chair of the Program Council for the Master Programs in Public Health (PRPH).

Research mainly in health economics and health related preventive actions.

Lars Weinehall

Lars Weinehall is professor at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

He has amongst other things done research on type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, aging and health inequalities.

Ann Öhman

Ann Öhman is Professor at Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).

She has, amongst other things, done research on elderly care in Northern Sweden.

Health & inequality

Sören Edvinsson

Sören Edvinsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research has mainly focused on different aspects of health and mortality in history, in particular social inequalities in health with a focus on northern Sweden.

Urban Janlert

Urban Janlert is professor emeritus of Public Health, specialist in Social Medicine. 

He does research in social epidemiology (unemployment, social deprivation).

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Miguel San Sebastian

I coordinate the Norrland Observatory for Equity in Health and Health Care (NOEHHC) which monitors socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care in northern Sweden.

I am also health research leader at Várdduo-Center for Sami Research.

Lars Weinehall

Lars Weinehall is professor at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

He has amongst other things done research on type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, aging and health inequalities.

Maria Wiklund

Maria Wiklund is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She has done research, amongst other things, on health inequalites, health related to gender, mental health and body perception, with a special focus on youth.

Infections

Clas Ahlm

Clas Ahlm is professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

He does research on infectious diseases, for example viruses' which are spread through mosquitos in the Arctic area.

Birgitta Evengård

Birgitta Evengård is professor and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Microbiology and head of the unit for Infecious diseases.

Climate change will have a profound and rapid impact on the human biome. As climate change occurs at the fastest speed and also with the highest impact in the North this perspective is a rewarding one to study. The human biome in the Norths includes the change in the flora and fauna, all transforming the pretexts for development of societies in the North. A holistic approach including collaboration with many scholars is necessary.

Maria Furberg

Maria Furberg is a physician at the infection clinic at Norrland’s University Hospital in Umeå.

She is a specialist in infectious disease and medicine and has a doctorate in epidemiology with a thesis about climate change and health with focus on northern Sweden.

I research if assumed climate sensitive zoonotic infections, first and foremost tularaemia (rabbit fever). Climate sensitive infections respect no boundaries, and surveillance and research around these diseases need to be done through international cooperation. In the Arctic Council group ICS – International Circumpolar Surveillance –, where I sit as Sweden’s representative in the steering group, as well as co-chair in the working group for climate sensitive infectious diseases, we share and compile data and information about select infections from the Arctic countries and regions. I have a particular interest in Arctic indigenous populations who are especially exposed to climate change and zoonotic infections, and in many Arctic countries are socially neglected groups.

Mental health

Lars Jacobsson

Lars Jacobsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at the Department of Clinical Studies, at the psychiatry unit.

For many years I have worked with mental health in several different environments, including Africa, Central America and countries in Eastern Europe. During later years I have, together with several postgraduate students, researched the mental health issues of Swedish Sami with particular focus on suicide issues. In connection with this I have also collaborated with scientists and clinicians in Norway, Finland and Russia to further develop the work being made on suicide prevention among Sami.

Maria Wiklund

Maria Wiklund is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She has done research, amongst other things, on health inequalites, health related to gender, mental health and body perception, with a special focus on youth.

Mortality

Kristin Ahlm

Kristin Ahlm is affiliated to the Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

She has done research on mortality in relation to different parameters, for an example unnatural deaths within reindeer herding Sámi families.

Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Karin Hellström Ängerud

Karin Hällström Ängerud is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research primarily on cardiovascular disease and mortality.

Erling Häggström Lundevaller

I am a statistician working at the Centre for Demographic and Aging Research (CEDAR) and the Statistics Department and also affiliated with Stockholm University's demographic unit, SUDA.

My research interests mainly relate to different demographic issues. One of these is the impact of climate on mortality, with special attention being paid to differences between different groups, for example between Sami and the rest of the population.


Another research focus is what effect disability has had on individuals' life trajectories both in historical and modern times and how other factors such as gender and social group influence the effect.


Another focus is the influence of genetics on demographic processes where I studied the effects of the blood group Rh- and inbreeding.
As statistical tools, I use methods that enable analysis from a system perspective such as micro simulation and sequence analysis. These methods can often illustrate problems in a more realistic way.


In my research I use both historical data from parish records and modern data from registers that illustrate living conditions and health. Sweden's unique historical data can provide an insight into what life was like in the past.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Ulf Nilsson

Ulf Nilsson is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the  section of Medicine.

He researches, amongst other things, cardiovascular health, obesity and mortality.

Margareta Norberg

The Arctic dimension in my research has two legs. First, evaluations based on data from the county wide Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) regarding [...]

prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), with a special focus on the social gap in health including differencies in health between inland and coastland populations and  between men and wome. Second, VIPVIZA, a randomized controlled trial nested in VIP and primary care. VIPVIZA evaluates the potential of pictorial information  about  individual´s actual subclinical atherosclerosis, as compared to conventional statistical risk evaluation based on risk factors such as smoking and high blood lipids, to improve CVD prevention. The broad range of data renders a unique potential to understand barriers and facilitators of evidence based CVD prevention among both individuals and the professions, through evaluation of the interplay between social, psychological and behavioral factors as well as biomarkers and ultrasound based morphological data in the atherosclerotic process leading to CVD. This is expected to contribute to development of better preventive methods, and in the long run reduction of premature CVDs and the social gap in health.

Monika Norberg

Monika Norberg is lecturer at the Department of Nursing.

Her research is about breast cancer survivorship and the genered discourse surrounding the subject.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Barbara Schumann

Associate Professor; PhD in epidemiology. Research focus on weather and climate change impacts on human health.

Ongoing studies on weather-related mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition, using historical population and weather records, and on the role of oppressive weather types on mortality and morbidity in contemporary and future Sweden.

Lars Weinehall

Lars Weinehall is professor at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

He has amongst other things done research on type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, aging and health inequalities.

Nutrition

Stina Bodén

Stina Bodén is a postgraduate student at the Department of Radiation Sciences, the unit for oncology. She says the following about her research:

In my postgraduate project I study the inflammatory effect of nutritional intake amongst individuals in northern Sweden in relation to the risk of getting cancer, in particular colon cancer. We use poll data and blood tests from participants in Norra Sveriges Hälsoundersökningar (VIP and MONICA) to examine these connections.

Maria Waling

I'm an associate professor and head of the department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science. 

My main research focus is on different aspects of children's food habits. The past years my main focus has been on school lunch with a focus on the Nordic countries. I am also involved in a research project where a Paleolithic diet and exercise is tested on adults with type 2 diabetes. I mainly teach in classes regarding children's food habits, dietary assessment methods and scientific methods. In 2018 I was rewarded with a price from "Kunliga Skytteanska Samfundet" which is a price that a young, successful researcher at Umeå University receives.

Occupational health

Kåre Eriksson

Kåre Eriksson is affiliated as associate professor at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

My research is about biomarkers for vibraton-induced white fingers. I also work on assessing exposure to the respiratory irritant substance trichloramine in a bathhouse environment.

Karl Forsell

My research is about work environment for seafarers. 

During last years, there has been an increase in the ship traffic through the Northeast passage between Europe and Asia made possible by decreasing ice in the Arctic. The work environment for seafarers operating the area is however poorly investigated.

Sofia Karlsson

Within my thesis project I study the Swedish crisis medicine preparedness for large accidents in underground mines.

In Sweden, the nine Swedish underground mines are localized to the northern and middle parts of the country. The mines’ subarctic geographical location means that there is a limited amount of available emergency response units, as well as relatively long travel times in cold climates.

All three organizations (mine, emergency response and ambulance) play a major part in the implementation of the rescue scenario. A scenario below ground means long, dark, cold and often moist environments, where emergency personnel need to navigate an environment which is tough to overview. The mining crews have knowledge of the inaccessible environment as well access to resources which are needed in these scenarios. Emergency personnel can perform carry through the rescue below ground in collaboration with the mining crews, with paramedics taking care of the injured. Collaboration is thereby a leading word of my thesis project.

Ingrid Liljelind

Ingrid Liljelind is a certified working environment hygienist at the unit for working environment medicine, Region Västerbotten and [...]

is adjuct associate professor and researcher at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

In my work as a working environment hygienist I meet workers who have been exposed to cold environments in their work, often in combination with vibrating machinery, for example rock drills, saws and multitools. My research interest therefor has been to study how cold working environments affect health, with focus especially on hands and fingers. Our research group has created a cohort with focus on cold and health in Norrland (CHINS – Cold and Health in Northern Sweden), in which about 12 600 respondents in the northern region take part. Another part of my research is construction-related illness (BRO). Our cold climate set certain demands on the buildings we inhabit, and this also relates to the indoor environment.

Ronnie Lundström

Ronne Lundström is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, and engaged in [...]

the project ”Cold and Health in Northern Sweden" (CHINS) which investigates health in relation to a cold working environment and vibrating tools.

Tohr Nilsson

Tohr Nilsson is associate professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about hand-arm injuries caused from using vibrating/shaking tools in cold environments.

Hans Pettersson

Hans Pettersson is a researcher at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section of Sustainable Health. He says the following about his research:

The goal with my research is to improve work environment and health amongst workers. Above all I work with work environments in building- and mining industries but also other industries in northern Sweden. A lot of workers in these industries work and live in a sub-arctic climate with long and cold winters. I research how work environment in cold climates affect worker’s health and how work environment can be reformed so that health issues can be avoided. Focus within my field of research about work in a cold environment has been how sense of touch and blood circulation in hands and fingers can become more impaired in a cold climate amongst workers who are subjected to vibrations from hand-held vibrating machines such as chainsaws, sanding machines and jackhammers. Further, I study how noise and work in a cold climate amongst building workers can increase the risk for heart-disease.

Anita Pettersson-Strömbäck

Anita does research about work and health in Sweden, especially the northern parts of the country, which have a clear arctic cultural-geographic connection. She says the following:

Sparsely populated areas, small societies, ageing populations, brain drain, long winters with snow, cold and darkness puts differents demands on how work must be organized to contribute to good health. One example is the Norräng school where I and my colleague Maria Nordin follow one low- and middle mandatory school which has hired a new category of personnel, class mentors, to free up teacher work hours when it comes to the school's mission to teach. A first report of our findings can be found here.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Public health & prevention

Hanna Blåhed

Political scientist with a master’s degree in Public Health.

Holds an interest in Arctic health. At present working with a Health Impact Assessment regarding the potential mine establishment in Gállok/Kallak which connects to Indigenous health.

Mats Eliasson

Mats Eliasson is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Senior counsultant at the Medical Department, Sunderby Hospital.

My research is about the presence of myocardial infarction and stroke in the Norrbotten and Västerbotten regions. The past few years we have analyzed the levels of D-vitamin in the population, with the idea that we who live far in the north with long periods of darkness during the year possibly could have lower levels of D-vitamin. However, our first results showed that D-vitamin deficiency was rare even during winter. Together with Dr. Viktor Oskarsson in Piteå we are broadening these analyzes to compare our data with other regions in Europe. We also study change over time for the male hormone testosterone, where international reports are describing falling levels over time among adult men.

Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Kåre Eriksson

Kåre Eriksson is affiliated as associate professor at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

My research is about biomarkers for vibraton-induced white fingers. I also work on assessing exposure to the respiratory irritant substance trichloramine in a bathhouse environment.

Maria Furberg

Maria Furberg is a physician at the infection clinic at Norrland’s University Hospital in Umeå.

She is a specialist in infectious disease and medicine and has a doctorate in epidemiology with a thesis about climate change and health with focus on northern Sweden.

I research if assumed climate sensitive zoonotic infections, first and foremost tularaemia (rabbit fever). Climate sensitive infections respect no boundaries, and surveillance and research around these diseases need to be done through international cooperation. In the Arctic Council group ICS – International Circumpolar Surveillance –, where I sit as Sweden’s representative in the steering group, as well as co-chair in the working group for climate sensitive infectious diseases, we share and compile data and information about select infections from the Arctic countries and regions. I have a particular interest in Arctic indigenous populations who are especially exposed to climate change and zoonotic infections, and in many Arctic countries are socially neglected groups.

Lina Gyllencreutz

Lina Gyllencreutz is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research mostly on accidents and crisis medicine, especially involving children, and elderly in outdoors environments.

Michael Haney

Michael Haney is head of the unit for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.

He has foremostly done research on crisis medicine and emergency response care.

Urban Janlert

Urban Janlert is professor emeritus of Public Health, specialist in Social Medicine. 

He does research in social epidemiology (unemployment, social deprivation).

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Hanne Krage Carlsen

Hanna Krage Carlsen is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the Section of Sustainable Health.

She does research on air pollution from traffic and how it affects health.

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Maria Nilsson

Maria Nilsson is research fellow at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

My research is in the field of climate change and health. My main interest is climate adaptation, climate communication and policy development.

Margareta Norberg

The Arctic dimension in my research has two legs. First, evaluations based on data from the county wide Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) regarding [...]

prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), with a special focus on the social gap in health including differencies in health between inland and coastland populations and  between men and wome. Second, VIPVIZA, a randomized controlled trial nested in VIP and primary care. VIPVIZA evaluates the potential of pictorial information  about  individual´s actual subclinical atherosclerosis, as compared to conventional statistical risk evaluation based on risk factors such as smoking and high blood lipids, to improve CVD prevention. The broad range of data renders a unique potential to understand barriers and facilitators of evidence based CVD prevention among both individuals and the professions, through evaluation of the interplay between social, psychological and behavioral factors as well as biomarkers and ultrasound based morphological data in the atherosclerotic process leading to CVD. This is expected to contribute to development of better preventive methods, and in the long run reduction of premature CVDs and the social gap in health.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Olena Rzhepishevska

I am a microbiologist/molecular biologist. I am affiliated research fellow at the Clinical Microbiology Department and work as a senior research engineer at the Chemistry Department, UmU.

My PhD project was about metabolism of acidophilic & psychrophilic (acid & clod-loving) bacteria from Arctic environments.

Now I work with several projects using metabolomics for biomarker research in infectious diseases, understanding of mixed bacterial biofilms in clinical and biotechnological settings, effect of antibiotics and some other. Here you can see most of my scientific publications.

I am very interested in tuberculosis (TB): drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and biomarkers of TB in human. TB is not only a biomedical issue but also a complex social phenomenon. In 2016, I joined TBnet, a European network of clinical researchers who work with TB. In TBnet I am responsible for Advocacy.

In Arctic countries and in Eastern Europe (with Russia being both Arctic & Eastern European country) TB is still very prevalent and access to healthcare and its quality is still an issue. By my research, I try to improve diagnostic and treatment and advocate for more support to people and countries affected by TB. In Umea, I am a co-organizer of Arctic Meetings on Clinical TB.

Klas-Göran Sahlen

Klas-Göran Sahlen is Deputy head of the Department and chair of the Program Council for the Master Programs in Public Health (PRPH).

Research mainly in health economics and health related preventive actions.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Marcus Schmitt-Egenolf

Marcus is professor and chief physician at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

His main research interests are melanomia and psoriasis, diseases who are directly affected by the climate.

Sven Arne Silfverdal

Sven Arne Silfverdal is associate professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Sciences, at the unit for Professional Development, Pediatrics.

He works foremostly with children’s health and diseases. In an Arctic context he has amongst other things written about D-vitamin deficiency in people living in northern areas.

Annika Toots

Annika Toots is affiliated as other position at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She does research primarily on aging related health issues, for instance gait speed.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Sports

Christer Malm

Christer Malm is Professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Sports Medicine.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about blood doping, which is widely spread within cross country skiing, and also involves stays at high altitudes.

Rita Sjöström

Rita Sjöström is adjunct associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

The Arctic dimensions of her research includes research on tuberculosis, how cold affects health, as well as exercise in cold environments.

Nikolai Stenfors

Nikolai works at the Department of Public Health & Clinical Medicine. He says the following about his research:

My research program "Cold, physical activity and respiratory systems" studies the connection between physical activity in cold environments and respiratory health. The long term goal is to improve diagnostics, treatment and prevention of cold-related respiratory problems within the populance. The research program consists of poll inquiries, clinical patient studies and experimental studies in a cold environment chamber.

Welfare & well-being

Margareta Brännström

Margareta Brännström is associate professor at the Department of Nursing at Campus Skellefteå. 

She researches palliative care in the North.

Fredrik Elgh

Fredrik Elgh is a Professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

My research is about the herpes virus and it's role in the development of Alzheimers disease. Earlier research includes viral zoonosis' - that is, virus diseases which spread between animals and humans, as well as the role of the Flu virus throughout history.

Åsa Hörnsten

Åsa Hörnsten is a professor at the Department of Nursing. She says the following about her research:

Our research group conducts research on health and well-being, as well as experiences of chronic disease, first and foremost type 2 diabetes which is endemic disease, as well as self-care and self-care support. To give adequate self-care support it is required that one understand how the person with for an example diabetes understands their disease. Personal understanding models or explanation models have been studied by anthropologists amongst native peoples in e.g. Australia and Northern America where custom education has been tried that takes into consideration traditions and cultural aspects. This can be about e.g. traditions around food and physical activity or perspectives on medication or disease in general, which affects how necessary self-care can be applied. No studies except ours have studied how persons in northern Sweden understand their own disease. From this knowledge we have amongst other things developed a model for self-care support in group aimed at persons with type 2 diabetes, as well as a screening instrument to understand people’s basis for efficient self-care, and also we have developed a webpage.

Ulf Isaksson

Ulf Isaksson is Associate professor at Department of Nursing and is [...]

specialized in the subjects of elderly care, especially with the care of elderly with dementia or behavioural changes, so called BPSD. He has also done research into e-health. His research is foremostly into the elderly, self-care as well as E-health with a rural perspective. He is also engaged in psychometrics where he currently leads a master-student within the HALDI-project.

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Nina Lindelöf

Nina Lindelöf is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the units Physiotherapy, and Geriatric Medicine.

She does research primarily on geriatric care, and how physical training/physiotherapy affects the elderly.

Christer Malm

Christer Malm is Professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Sports Medicine.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about blood doping, which is widely spread within cross country skiing, and also involves stays at high altitudes.

Beatrice Melin

Beatrice Melin is professor in Molecular epidemiology of cancer, at the Department of Radiation Sciences.

Some cancer sites are aggregated in families in the Northern region of Sweden. Our aim is to identify the etiological causes to these types of cancer including among other whole genome sequencing.  My research focus is on glioma a malignant brain tumor but I also study hematological diseases and colorectal cancer. By using cases and controls from a very defined arctic population that have specific gene pool we hope to understand the causes of cancer. 

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Ingeborg Nilsson

The research we do aims to measure, understand and explain activity engagement, ergo what people do, in the later stages of their lives.

Beyond that we do research to develop efficient activity-based projects to support a healthy aging. The research focuses mostly on the aging population of northern Sweden where many people age in sparsely populated areas with long geographical distances, where social services aren’t as readily available as in cities, and where the share of elderly people are often higher than in other parts of Sweden. These projects we develop therefor need to be adjusted to fit these specific prerequisites, whereby end users are often included in the research process and that digital technology can be used as a tool.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Maria Nilsson

Maria Nilsson is research fellow at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

My research is in the field of climate change and health. My main interest is climate adaptation, climate communication and policy development.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Ann-Christine Petersson Hjelm

Ann-Christine is associate professor at the Department of Law, and has studied [...]

power relations in Nordic elderly care, and the ways in which elderly negotiate power relations in the face of for an example New Public Governance.

Klas-Göran Sahlen

Klas-Göran Sahlen is Deputy head of the Department and chair of the Program Council for the Master Programs in Public Health (PRPH).

Research mainly in health economics and health related preventive actions.

Sven Arne Silfverdal

Sven Arne Silfverdal is associate professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Sciences, at the unit for Professional Development, Pediatrics.

He works foremostly with children’s health and diseases. In an Arctic context he has amongst other things written about D-vitamin deficiency in people living in northern areas.

Albin Stjernbrandt

My research project aims to describe how the working population in northern Sweden is exposed to cold, using an epidemiological approach. I want to investigate if there is [...]

a link between high exposure to ambient cold and different health outcomes. I primarily study how the vascular and neural function of the hands is affected by cold exposure. Also, I want to see if there are other factors contributing to the outcomes, such as tobacco use, high exposure to hand-arm vibration, hereditary factors, or certain diseases.

The project also includes laboratory studies on volunteers. In these experiments, we investigate the vascular and neural function of the hands using various methods with high precision, including thermal quantitative sensory testing and laser Doppler flow measurements. One of the purposes of the studies is to determine whether there are disturbances in the regulation of the blood flow in the skin of subjects who experience cold sensitivity or Raynaud's phenomenon.

The research has an arctic approach since we investigate the exposure patterns of people living in a subarctic climate. Previous research has shown that some populations in these areas, such as the Sámi and Inuits, have particularly good cold adaptation capabilities. In our studies, we seek to understand these mechanisms in greater detail.

Åsa Strinnholm

Åsa Strinnholm is affiliated as research nurse at Department of Clinical Sciences.

Her speciality is research on food allergies and food hypersensitivty amongst children and youth.

Annika Toots

Annika Toots is affiliated as other position at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She does research primarily on aging related health issues, for instance gait speed.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Anders Wänman

Anders Wänman is professor, senior consultant dentist at Department of Odontology.

He is head of the department, and has previously done research on dental health amongst Sámi women.

Inger Öhlund

Inger Öhlund is affiliated as research fellow at Department of Clinical Sciences, at the unit for Pediatrics.

She does research mainly on nutrition amongst children.

Substance abuse

Kristin Ahlm

Kristin Ahlm is affiliated to the Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

She has done research on mortality in relation to different parameters, for an example unnatural deaths within reindeer herding Sámi families.

Annika Nordström

Annika Nordström is adjunct associate professor at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

Her research is about social service issues in different groups, for an example alcoholism in some reindeer herding Sámi families.

E-health

Kurt Boman

Professor, senior at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

Telemedicine Projects, especially Storuman Health care center, with Peter Berggren and Mante Hedman.

Anette Edin-Liljegren

Anette Edin-Liljegren, BMA, adjunct associate professor at the Department of Nursing and research coordinator/researcher at the Rural medicine centre, [...]

FOU-staff in Region Västerbotten and FOU-head within the hospital care area of Southern Lapland. I am also associated as researcher at LIME, Innovative care at the Caroline Institute (KI).

After my thesis within clinical chemistry at Gothenburg University my research has been about the health situation of the Sámi, especially amongst reindeer herders and their working environment since the year 2000, for starters at the Stiftelsen Glesbygdens research unit in southern Lapland. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease, life quality, psychosocial health, work related health as well as trust in the healthcare system has been some of the areas which I have studied together with Sámi representatives and other researchers. I am also the head supervisor for the doctoral student project “Sámi and care in palliative care – knowledge about traditions to develop the care of the future”.

At the Rural medicine centre we study different solutions for a high quality and close care in municipalities and regions. My research is now about digital care meetings, social rooms and continuity in the healthcare system.

Åsa Hörnsten

Åsa Hörnsten is a professor at the Department of Nursing. She says the following about her research:

Our research group conducts research on health and well-being, as well as experiences of chronic disease, first and foremost type 2 diabetes which is endemic disease, as well as self-care and self-care support. To give adequate self-care support it is required that one understand how the person with for an example diabetes understands their disease. Personal understanding models or explanation models have been studied by anthropologists amongst native peoples in e.g. Australia and Northern America where custom education has been tried that takes into consideration traditions and cultural aspects. This can be about e.g. traditions around food and physical activity or perspectives on medication or disease in general, which affects how necessary self-care can be applied. No studies except ours have studied how persons in northern Sweden understand their own disease. From this knowledge we have amongst other things developed a model for self-care support in group aimed at persons with type 2 diabetes, as well as a screening instrument to understand people’s basis for efficient self-care, and also we have developed a webpage.

Ulf Isaksson

Ulf Isaksson is Associate professor at Department of Nursing and is [...]

specialized in the subjects of elderly care, especially with the care of elderly with dementia or behavioural changes, so called BPSD. He has also done research into e-health. His research is foremostly into the elderly, self-care as well as E-health with a rural perspective. He is also engaged in psychometrics where he currently leads a master-student within the HALDI-project.

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Helena Lindgren

My research focuses on personalised intelligent (semi-autonomous) systems for improving health and facilitating activity (work and pleasure) in spite of personal or environmental barriers.

I consider for example Arctic aspects such as sparsley populated regions, high proportion of older population, climate and long distances to services.

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez is research fellow at the Department of Computing Science.

He has done research, amongst other things, in e-health and the possibilities of augumented reality technology to improve medication use at home.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Ulrika Öberg

Ulrika Öberg is Lecturer at Department of Nursing and is specialized in [...]

research around self-care through e-health technologies for patients with type 2 diabetes.

Health technologies

Jonas Alex

I work with research and development, as well as the specialist education, on ambulance healthcare. I am an expert within:

  • Thermic comfort
  • Hypothermia
  • Prehospital patient safety
  • Police emergency healthcare
  • Crisis medicine
Kurt Boman

Professor, senior at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

Telemedicine Projects, especially Storuman Health care center, with Peter Berggren and Mante Hedman.

Helena Lindgren

My research focuses on personalised intelligent (semi-autonomous) systems for improving health and facilitating activity (work and pleasure) in spite of personal or environmental barriers.

I consider for example Arctic aspects such as sparsley populated regions, high proportion of older population, climate and long distances to services.

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez is research fellow at the Department of Computing Science.

He has done research, amongst other things, in e-health and the possibilities of augumented reality technology to improve medication use at home.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Ulrika Öberg

Ulrika Öberg is Lecturer at Department of Nursing and is specialized in [...]

research around self-care through e-health technologies for patients with type 2 diabetes.

Toxicology

Gunnar Nordberg

Gunnar Nordberg does research at the unit for Working environment medicine since 1979, about the toxicology and epidemiology of metals as well as indoor pollutants (trichloramine).

I am interested in energy and health i.e. the risks of negative health consequences of different energy systems. An Arctic dimension of my research has been to look at the risks for human health in connection to pollutants from industry in Northern Sweden – amongst them the industrial area Rönnskärsverket.

Accidents

Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Lina Gyllencreutz

Lina Gyllencreutz is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research mostly on accidents and crisis medicine, especially involving children, and elderly in outdoors environments.

Johan Hylander

My area of interest is disaster medicine. Especially medical management in tunnel-incidents. 

Road tunnel Incidents has the potential of being catastrophic, as shown by the vehicle fires of the Mount Blanc and St. Gotthard tunnels.  My research is focused on collaboration and coordination with the emergency services and tunnel owners. As  I am soon done with my medical studies and have a background in the emergency medical services, prehospital medical care is one of my special interests, especially in the cold nordic climate. 

Sofia Karlsson

Within my thesis project I study the Swedish crisis medicine preparedness for large accidents in underground mines.

In Sweden, the nine Swedish underground mines are localized to the northern and middle parts of the country. The mines’ subarctic geographical location means that there is a limited amount of available emergency response units, as well as relatively long travel times in cold climates.

All three organizations (mine, emergency response and ambulance) play a major part in the implementation of the rescue scenario. A scenario below ground means long, dark, cold and often moist environments, where emergency personnel need to navigate an environment which is tough to overview. The mining crews have knowledge of the inaccessible environment as well access to resources which are needed in these scenarios. Emergency personnel can perform carry through the rescue below ground in collaboration with the mining crews, with paramedics taking care of the injured. Collaboration is thereby a leading word of my thesis project.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Maud Stenberg

My research is about rehabilitation after traumatic brain damage in northern Sweden, especially [...]

severe traumatic brain damage, i.e. the persons who have suffered a traumatic skull injury and are unconscious when they arrive at the hospital.

In this part of the country there are special circumstances for immediate care considering the arctic environment, but also the possibilities for later state rehabilition measures where there occurs different needs between urban and rural areas. There are also special needs for the indigenous populance, the Sami rehabilition process, which aren't always met. Recovery and rehabilition within this patient group varies, and today there are no guidelines for the later care process, as there is of the immediate care. Those who are affected and their families lack any form of cooperation between different agents during their rehabilitions process and for those with more severe long term conditions there is a need for follow up process, of which there is none today. The family perspective is also important as a brain injury also affects the family and this is part of my ongoing work, as well as light traumatic brain damage/commotio.

Exposure

Jonas Alex

I work with research and development, as well as the specialist education, on ambulance healthcare. I am an expert within:

  • Thermic comfort
  • Hypothermia
  • Prehospital patient safety
  • Police emergency healthcare
  • Crisis medicine
Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Ronnie Lundström

Ronne Lundström is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, and engaged in [...]

the project ”Cold and Health in Northern Sweden" (CHINS) which investigates health in relation to a cold working environment and vibrating tools.

Tohr Nilsson

Tohr Nilsson is associate professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about hand-arm injuries caused from using vibrating/shaking tools in cold environments.

Hans Pettersson

Hans Pettersson is a researcher at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section of Sustainable Health. He says the following about his research:

The goal with my research is to improve work environment and health amongst workers. Above all I work with work environments in building- and mining industries but also other industries in northern Sweden. A lot of workers in these industries work and live in a sub-arctic climate with long and cold winters. I research how work environment in cold climates affect worker’s health and how work environment can be reformed so that health issues can be avoided. Focus within my field of research about work in a cold environment has been how sense of touch and blood circulation in hands and fingers can become more impaired in a cold climate amongst workers who are subjected to vibrations from hand-held vibrating machines such as chainsaws, sanding machines and jackhammers. Further, I study how noise and work in a cold climate amongst building workers can increase the risk for heart-disease.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Rita Sjöström

Rita Sjöström is adjunct associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

The Arctic dimensions of her research includes research on tuberculosis, how cold affects health, as well as exercise in cold environments.

Nikolai Stenfors

Nikolai works at the Department of Public Health & Clinical Medicine. He says the following about his research:

My research program "Cold, physical activity and respiratory systems" studies the connection between physical activity in cold environments and respiratory health. The long term goal is to improve diagnostics, treatment and prevention of cold-related respiratory problems within the populance. The research program consists of poll inquiries, clinical patient studies and experimental studies in a cold environment chamber.

Albin Stjernbrandt

My research project aims to describe how the working population in northern Sweden is exposed to cold, using an epidemiological approach. I want to investigate if there is [...]

a link between high exposure to ambient cold and different health outcomes. I primarily study how the vascular and neural function of the hands is affected by cold exposure. Also, I want to see if there are other factors contributing to the outcomes, such as tobacco use, high exposure to hand-arm vibration, hereditary factors, or certain diseases.

The project also includes laboratory studies on volunteers. In these experiments, we investigate the vascular and neural function of the hands using various methods with high precision, including thermal quantitative sensory testing and laser Doppler flow measurements. One of the purposes of the studies is to determine whether there are disturbances in the regulation of the blood flow in the skin of subjects who experience cold sensitivity or Raynaud's phenomenon.

The research has an arctic approach since we investigate the exposure patterns of people living in a subarctic climate. Previous research has shown that some populations in these areas, such as the Sámi and Inuits, have particularly good cold adaptation capabilities. In our studies, we seek to understand these mechanisms in greater detail.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Bin Yang

Bing Yang is affiliated as professor at Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

Bin researches thermic comfort in subarctic areas.

Disabilities

Catharina Henje

Catharina Hejne is a lecturer at the Umeå Institute of Design (UID).

She does research on adaptive design to improve public spaces for people living with disabilities.

Erling Häggström Lundevaller

I am a statistician working at the Centre for Demographic and Aging Research (CEDAR) and the Statistics Department and also affiliated with Stockholm University's demographic unit, SUDA.

My research interests mainly relate to different demographic issues. One of these is the impact of climate on mortality, with special attention being paid to differences between different groups, for example between Sami and the rest of the population.


Another research focus is what effect disability has had on individuals' life trajectories both in historical and modern times and how other factors such as gender and social group influence the effect.


Another focus is the influence of genetics on demographic processes where I studied the effects of the blood group Rh- and inbreeding.
As statistical tools, I use methods that enable analysis from a system perspective such as micro simulation and sequence analysis. These methods can often illustrate problems in a more realistic way.


In my research I use both historical data from parish records and modern data from registers that illustrate living conditions and health. Sweden's unique historical data can provide an insight into what life was like in the past.

Crisis medicine

Jonas Alex

I work with research and development, as well as the specialist education, on ambulance healthcare. I am an expert within:

  • Thermic comfort
  • Hypothermia
  • Prehospital patient safety
  • Police emergency healthcare
  • Crisis medicine
Lina Gyllencreutz

Lina Gyllencreutz is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research mostly on accidents and crisis medicine, especially involving children, and elderly in outdoors environments.

Michael Haney

Michael Haney is head of the unit for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.

He has foremostly done research on crisis medicine and emergency response care.

Johan Hylander

My area of interest is disaster medicine. Especially medical management in tunnel-incidents. 

Road tunnel Incidents has the potential of being catastrophic, as shown by the vehicle fires of the Mount Blanc and St. Gotthard tunnels.  My research is focused on collaboration and coordination with the emergency services and tunnel owners. As  I am soon done with my medical studies and have a background in the emergency medical services, prehospital medical care is one of my special interests, especially in the cold nordic climate. 

Disease

Clas Ahlm

Clas Ahlm is professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

He does research on infectious diseases, for example viruses' which are spread through mosquitos in the Arctic area.

Sven Bergström

Sven Bergström is professor at Department of Molecular Biology.

Amongst other things, he researches Northern infectious disease and parasitic diseases, which are spread through mosquitos and ticks.

Stina Bodén

Stina Bodén is a postgraduate student at the Department of Radiation Sciences, the unit for oncology. She says the following about her research:

In my postgraduate project I study the inflammatory effect of nutritional intake amongst individuals in northern Sweden in relation to the risk of getting cancer, in particular colon cancer. We use poll data and blood tests from participants in Norra Sveriges Hälsoundersökningar (VIP and MONICA) to examine these connections.

Fredrik Elgh

Fredrik Elgh is a Professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

My research is about the herpes virus and it's role in the development of Alzheimers disease. Earlier research includes viral zoonosis' - that is, virus diseases which spread between animals and humans, as well as the role of the Flu virus throughout history.

Mats Eliasson

Mats Eliasson is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Senior counsultant at the Medical Department, Sunderby Hospital.

My research is about the presence of myocardial infarction and stroke in the Norrbotten and Västerbotten regions. The past few years we have analyzed the levels of D-vitamin in the population, with the idea that we who live far in the north with long periods of darkness during the year possibly could have lower levels of D-vitamin. However, our first results showed that D-vitamin deficiency was rare even during winter. Together with Dr. Viktor Oskarsson in Piteå we are broadening these analyzes to compare our data with other regions in Europe. We also study change over time for the male hormone testosterone, where international reports are describing falling levels over time among adult men.

Magnus Evander

Research on zoonotic virus diseases. Viruses that are transmitted from vectors (e.g. mosquitoes, ticks) or mammals (e.g. voles) to humans and cause disease.

An Arctic in climate change affects the ecology and thus also the vectors and animals that carry the virus. The mosquito-borne viral disease “Ockelbo disease” has spread to the north in Sweden and the vole-borne viral disease nephropatia epidemica has spread to new areas in Sweden. We investigate transmission, pathogenesis, spread, vector competence, etc. of virus, vectors and reservoirs in relation to ecology.

Birgitta Evengård

Birgitta Evengård is professor and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Microbiology and head of the unit for Infecious diseases.

Climate change will have a profound and rapid impact on the human biome. As climate change occurs at the fastest speed and also with the highest impact in the North this perspective is a rewarding one to study. The human biome in the Norths includes the change in the flora and fauna, all transforming the pretexts for development of societies in the North. A holistic approach including collaboration with many scholars is necessary.

Karin Hellström Ängerud

Karin Hällström Ängerud is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research primarily on cardiovascular disease and mortality.

Jing Helmersson

Jing is a modeller in public health and a physicist with two PhDs, one in Public Health (Umeå University 2018) and one in Physics (University of Michigan 1989).

Jing has published 76 scientific articles in physics and public health. Her current research is comparison between Sámi Traditional Healing with Traditional Chinese Medicine - literature review and interview study. Her main research interests are Arctic well-being with focus on integration of scientific research with traditional knowledge/practices of Indigenous people.

Her previous research in public health was to study the relationship between climate change and health. She developed mathematical models for vector-borne disease (dengue) and Aedes mosquitoes, and their future projections under various climate change scenarios to support climate mitigation. She was born in China and lived in USA for 20 years before moving to Sweden in 2004. Jing was formerly a professor in Physics from California State University Long Beach with over 20 years of physics research in quantum optics and soft condensed matter physics - magnetorheological fluids. She also has experience in Chinese medicine in the area of disease prevention and lifestyle consultation. In addition, she gives public lecturer/workshops on promoting well-being from body, mind and spirit.

Beatrice Melin

Beatrice Melin is professor in Molecular epidemiology of cancer, at the Department of Radiation Sciences.

Some cancer sites are aggregated in families in the Northern region of Sweden. Our aim is to identify the etiological causes to these types of cancer including among other whole genome sequencing.  My research focus is on glioma a malignant brain tumor but I also study hematological diseases and colorectal cancer. By using cases and controls from a very defined arctic population that have specific gene pool we hope to understand the causes of cancer. 

Ulf Nilsson

Ulf Nilsson is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the  section of Medicine.

He researches, amongst other things, cardiovascular health, obesity and mortality.

Monika Norberg

Monika Norberg is lecturer at the Department of Nursing.

Her research is about breast cancer survivorship and the genered discourse surrounding the subject.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Olena Rzhepishevska

I am a microbiologist/molecular biologist. I am affiliated research fellow at the Clinical Microbiology Department and work as a senior research engineer at the Chemistry Department, UmU.

My PhD project was about metabolism of acidophilic & psychrophilic (acid & clod-loving) bacteria from Arctic environments.

Now I work with several projects using metabolomics for biomarker research in infectious diseases, understanding of mixed bacterial biofilms in clinical and biotechnological settings, effect of antibiotics and some other. Here you can see most of my scientific publications.

I am very interested in tuberculosis (TB): drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and biomarkers of TB in human. TB is not only a biomedical issue but also a complex social phenomenon. In 2016, I joined TBnet, a European network of clinical researchers who work with TB. In TBnet I am responsible for Advocacy.

In Arctic countries and in Eastern Europe (with Russia being both Arctic & Eastern European country) TB is still very prevalent and access to healthcare and its quality is still an issue. By my research, I try to improve diagnostic and treatment and advocate for more support to people and countries affected by TB. In Umea, I am a co-organizer of Arctic Meetings on Clinical TB.

Anders Sjöstedt

Tularemia, a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, has been endemic in certain areas of northern Sweden for almost a century and it has [...]

emerged in areas of middle Sweden during the past decades. In 2019, more than 1,000 individuals were diagnosed with tularemia in Sweden. The disease is especially prevalent in late summer and autumn.

We hypothesize that the predominant spread of F. tularensis in Sweden is through mosquitoes and that they acquire the bacteria in the water. In view of the specific association between outbreaks and meteorological and hydrological variables, it is very likely that future occurrences of tularemia will be affected by climate change and our preliminary predictions demonstrate that there will an increased incidence of tularemia in several areas of Sweden, in particular in the Arctic areas.

Tularemia is a significant health threat in endemic regions, but there are no methods to forecast an outbreak. Therefore, one of our aims is to develop at prognostic model, so health authorities could be alerted for an increased risk of an outbreak. We are specifically investigating putative risk factors in Norrbotten in order to improve the prognostic models. We are also investigating what the impact of future climate change will be. 

Nikolai Stenfors

Nikolai works at the Department of Public Health & Clinical Medicine. He says the following about his research:

My research program "Cold, physical activity and respiratory systems" studies the connection between physical activity in cold environments and respiratory health. The long term goal is to improve diagnostics, treatment and prevention of cold-related respiratory problems within the populance. The research program consists of poll inquiries, clinical patient studies and experimental studies in a cold environment chamber.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Olivia Wesula Luande

I am currently undertaking research on mosquito-borne zoonoses in humans and animals in the Arctic region with an aim of [...]

determining the abundance and distribution of diverse mosquito species by means of high-throughput genetic characterization; determining the occurrence and genetic diversity of mosquito-borne viruses; development of a model for mosquito vector competence for mosquito-borne viruses.

Environmental health

Ingvar Bergdahl

Long-lasting pollutants with a potential to affect human health is my main Arctic research focus.

Examples are PCB, DDT, and lead. I combine this with my other professional role, working with the biobank samples from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study, that holds blood samples from well over 100,000 individuals. These are later followed up and we can compare individuals who later got a certain disease with others. Previous studies concern for example: mercury and myocardial infarction; cadmium and fractures; and lead and kidney failure. Currently we study PCB, DDT, and other persistent organic pollutants in relation to diabetes.

Birgitta Evengård

Birgitta Evengård is professor and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Microbiology and head of the unit for Infecious diseases.

Climate change will have a profound and rapid impact on the human biome. As climate change occurs at the fastest speed and also with the highest impact in the North this perspective is a rewarding one to study. The human biome in the Norths includes the change in the flora and fauna, all transforming the pretexts for development of societies in the North. A holistic approach including collaboration with many scholars is necessary.

Bertil Forsberg

Bertil Forsberg is professor of Environmental Medicine and head of Section of Sustainable Health at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

His research is mainly focusing on health effects from environmental risk factors and climate, but also respiratory health in the north. He is leader of the group from Umeå University that together with SMHI (Swedish Met Office) are partners in a research project named Arctic Community Resilience to Boreal Environmental change: Assessing Risks for fire and disease, starting 2020 after being funded in an international call (Belmont Forum) where the research council Forte is funding the Swedish researchers. High latitude communities need ways to address the consequences of an increase in temperatures and heat extremes causing rapid changes and risks to human health related to changes in landscape fire activity and associated air quality degradation, and natural-focal disease occurrence. The project will make projections of how changes will respond and interact under a range of climate and urban development scenarios.

Karl Forsell

My research is about work environment for seafarers. 

During last years, there has been an increase in the ship traffic through the Northeast passage between Europe and Asia made possible by decreasing ice in the Arctic. The work environment for seafarers operating the area is however poorly investigated.

Jing Helmersson

Jing is a modeller in public health and a physicist with two PhDs, one in Public Health (Umeå University 2018) and one in Physics (University of Michigan 1989).

Jing has published 76 scientific articles in physics and public health. Her current research is comparison between Sámi Traditional Healing with Traditional Chinese Medicine - literature review and interview study. Her main research interests are Arctic well-being with focus on integration of scientific research with traditional knowledge/practices of Indigenous people.

Her previous research in public health was to study the relationship between climate change and health. She developed mathematical models for vector-borne disease (dengue) and Aedes mosquitoes, and their future projections under various climate change scenarios to support climate mitigation. She was born in China and lived in USA for 20 years before moving to Sweden in 2004. Jing was formerly a professor in Physics from California State University Long Beach with over 20 years of physics research in quantum optics and soft condensed matter physics - magnetorheological fluids. She also has experience in Chinese medicine in the area of disease prevention and lifestyle consultation. In addition, she gives public lecturer/workshops on promoting well-being from body, mind and spirit.

Hanne Krage Carlsen

Hanna Krage Carlsen is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the Section of Sustainable Health.

She does research on air pollution from traffic and how it affects health.

Maria Nilsson

Maria Nilsson is research fellow at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

My research is in the field of climate change and health. My main interest is climate adaptation, climate communication and policy development.

Gunnar Nordberg

Gunnar Nordberg does research at the unit for Working environment medicine since 1979, about the toxicology and epidemiology of metals as well as indoor pollutants (trichloramine).

I am interested in energy and health i.e. the risks of negative health consequences of different energy systems. An Arctic dimension of my research has been to look at the risks for human health in connection to pollutants from industry in Northern Sweden – amongst them the industrial area Rönnskärsverket.

Anna Oudin

Anna Oudin is an epidemiologist and statistician. 

Her research concerns how polluted air and other environmental factors can affect the brain, e.g. the risk of getting dementia or suffering from mental illness. The composition and content of air pollution differ between different areas, and it is therefore important that research is also conducted in Arctic areas.

Joacim Rocklöv

Joacim Rocklöv is an epidemiologist and statistician. He does research at the intersection between the areas global health, environmental epidemiology and infection epidemiology.

He leads a research group which focuses on modelling the aethology of diseases, and the development of predictive models for early warning systems. He is also active in research which means to understand how future disease burdens are affected by a changed climate, grounded in climate scenarios.

Barbara Schumann

Associate Professor; PhD in epidemiology. Research focus on weather and climate change impacts on human health.

Ongoing studies on weather-related mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition, using historical population and weather records, and on the role of oppressive weather types on mortality and morbidity in contemporary and future Sweden.

Anders Sjöstedt

Tularemia, a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, has been endemic in certain areas of northern Sweden for almost a century and it has [...]

emerged in areas of middle Sweden during the past decades. In 2019, more than 1,000 individuals were diagnosed with tularemia in Sweden. The disease is especially prevalent in late summer and autumn.

We hypothesize that the predominant spread of F. tularensis in Sweden is through mosquitoes and that they acquire the bacteria in the water. In view of the specific association between outbreaks and meteorological and hydrological variables, it is very likely that future occurrences of tularemia will be affected by climate change and our preliminary predictions demonstrate that there will an increased incidence of tularemia in several areas of Sweden, in particular in the Arctic areas.

Tularemia is a significant health threat in endemic regions, but there are no methods to forecast an outbreak. Therefore, one of our aims is to develop at prognostic model, so health authorities could be alerted for an increased risk of an outbreak. We are specifically investigating putative risk factors in Norrbotten in order to improve the prognostic models. We are also investigating what the impact of future climate change will be. 

Maria Wennberg

Maria Wennberg is a clinical dietitian with a PhD in environmental medicine. She works at Sustainable Health/ Nutritional Research at Public Health and [...]

Clinical Medicine, Umeå University and in Primary health care in Västerbotten.

My research is on the association between diet and/or environmental pollutants and health, mainly cardiovascular disease and diabetes type 2. The large dataset within Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS), where information has been collected since the middle of the 1980ties is the base for most of the research I am involved in. NSHDS contribute information on the situation in northern Sweden in arctic collaborations, for example Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), where I participate as expert for Sweden within the Human Health Assessment Group (HHAG). HHAG focus on the situation for the arctic populations concerning exposure to environmental pollutants, and this exposure is mainly through food.

Olivia Wesula Luande

I am currently undertaking research on mosquito-borne zoonoses in humans and animals in the Arctic region with an aim of [...]

determining the abundance and distribution of diverse mosquito species by means of high-throughput genetic characterization; determining the occurrence and genetic diversity of mosquito-borne viruses; development of a model for mosquito vector competence for mosquito-borne viruses.

Bin Yang

Bing Yang is affiliated as professor at Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.

Bin researches thermic comfort in subarctic areas.

Epidemiology

Per Axelsson

Together with Christina Storm Mienna I am leading the HALDI – project. The overall aim of the project is to establish a comprehensive understanding of [...]

the present health and living conditions for the adult population in Jokkmokk municipality, including the Sami population. Funding has been received from Wallenbergstiftelserna (MAW 2019-23) and the  Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (2018).

Sven Bergström

Sven Bergström is professor at Department of Molecular Biology.

Amongst other things, he researches Northern infectious disease and parasitic diseases, which are spread through mosquitos and ticks.

Stina Bodén

Stina Bodén is a postgraduate student at the Department of Radiation Sciences, the unit for oncology. She says the following about her research:

In my postgraduate project I study the inflammatory effect of nutritional intake amongst individuals in northern Sweden in relation to the risk of getting cancer, in particular colon cancer. We use poll data and blood tests from participants in Norra Sveriges Hälsoundersökningar (VIP and MONICA) to examine these connections.

Fredrik Elgh

Fredrik Elgh is a Professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

My research is about the herpes virus and it's role in the development of Alzheimers disease. Earlier research includes viral zoonosis' - that is, virus diseases which spread between animals and humans, as well as the role of the Flu virus throughout history.

Mats Eliasson

Mats Eliasson is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Senior counsultant at the Medical Department, Sunderby Hospital.

My research is about the presence of myocardial infarction and stroke in the Norrbotten and Västerbotten regions. The past few years we have analyzed the levels of D-vitamin in the population, with the idea that we who live far in the north with long periods of darkness during the year possibly could have lower levels of D-vitamin. However, our first results showed that D-vitamin deficiency was rare even during winter. Together with Dr. Viktor Oskarsson in Piteå we are broadening these analyzes to compare our data with other regions in Europe. We also study change over time for the male hormone testosterone, where international reports are describing falling levels over time among adult men.

Magnus Evander

Research on zoonotic virus diseases. Viruses that are transmitted from vectors (e.g. mosquitoes, ticks) or mammals (e.g. voles) to humans and cause disease.

An Arctic in climate change affects the ecology and thus also the vectors and animals that carry the virus. The mosquito-borne viral disease “Ockelbo disease” has spread to the north in Sweden and the vole-borne viral disease nephropatia epidemica has spread to new areas in Sweden. We investigate transmission, pathogenesis, spread, vector competence, etc. of virus, vectors and reservoirs in relation to ecology.

Maria Furberg

Maria Furberg is a physician at the infection clinic at Norrland’s University Hospital in Umeå.

She is a specialist in infectious disease and medicine and has a doctorate in epidemiology with a thesis about climate change and health with focus on northern Sweden.

I research if assumed climate sensitive zoonotic infections, first and foremost tularaemia (rabbit fever). Climate sensitive infections respect no boundaries, and surveillance and research around these diseases need to be done through international cooperation. In the Arctic Council group ICS – International Circumpolar Surveillance –, where I sit as Sweden’s representative in the steering group, as well as co-chair in the working group for climate sensitive infectious diseases, we share and compile data and information about select infections from the Arctic countries and regions. I have a particular interest in Arctic indigenous populations who are especially exposed to climate change and zoonotic infections, and in many Arctic countries are socially neglected groups.

Linnea Hedman

My name is Linnéa Hedman and I work as a researcher and project leader at the OLIN-studies in the Norrbotten region.

I am a behavioral scientist and associate professor in Epidemiology and Public health at Umeå University.

I primarily research teenage smoking - who starts to smoke, evaluation of tobacco preventive measures, and the connection between passive smoking and respiratory symptoms. I have also done research on the experience of people sick with chronic obstructive respiratory disease, who still cannot quit smoking. Beyond smoking, I have also done research on life quality amongst teens suffering from asthma.

Urban Janlert

Urban Janlert is professor emeritus of Public Health, specialist in Social Medicine. 

He does research in social epidemiology (unemployment, social deprivation).

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Anna Oudin

Anna Oudin is an epidemiologist and statistician. 

Her research concerns how polluted air and other environmental factors can affect the brain, e.g. the risk of getting dementia or suffering from mental illness. The composition and content of air pollution differ between different areas, and it is therefore important that research is also conducted in Arctic areas.

Joacim Rocklöv

Joacim Rocklöv is an epidemiologist and statistician. He does research at the intersection between the areas global health, environmental epidemiology and infection epidemiology.

He leads a research group which focuses on modelling the aethology of diseases, and the development of predictive models for early warning systems. He is also active in research which means to understand how future disease burdens are affected by a changed climate, grounded in climate scenarios.

Barbara Schumann

Associate Professor; PhD in epidemiology. Research focus on weather and climate change impacts on human health.

Ongoing studies on weather-related mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition, using historical population and weather records, and on the role of oppressive weather types on mortality and morbidity in contemporary and future Sweden.

Anders Sjöstedt

Tularemia, a zoonotic disease caused by Francisella tularensis, has been endemic in certain areas of northern Sweden for almost a century and it has [...]

emerged in areas of middle Sweden during the past decades. In 2019, more than 1,000 individuals were diagnosed with tularemia in Sweden. The disease is especially prevalent in late summer and autumn.

We hypothesize that the predominant spread of F. tularensis in Sweden is through mosquitoes and that they acquire the bacteria in the water. In view of the specific association between outbreaks and meteorological and hydrological variables, it is very likely that future occurrences of tularemia will be affected by climate change and our preliminary predictions demonstrate that there will an increased incidence of tularemia in several areas of Sweden, in particular in the Arctic areas.

Tularemia is a significant health threat in endemic regions, but there are no methods to forecast an outbreak. Therefore, one of our aims is to develop at prognostic model, so health authorities could be alerted for an increased risk of an outbreak. We are specifically investigating putative risk factors in Norrbotten in order to improve the prognostic models. We are also investigating what the impact of future climate change will be. 

Health data

Bertil Forsberg

Bertil Forsberg is professor of Environmental Medicine and head of Section of Sustainable Health at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

His research is mainly focusing on health effects from environmental risk factors and climate, but also respiratory health in the north. He is leader of the group from Umeå University that together with SMHI (Swedish Met Office) are partners in a research project named Arctic Community Resilience to Boreal Environmental change: Assessing Risks for fire and disease, starting 2020 after being funded in an international call (Belmont Forum) where the research council Forte is funding the Swedish researchers. High latitude communities need ways to address the consequences of an increase in temperatures and heat extremes causing rapid changes and risks to human health related to changes in landscape fire activity and associated air quality degradation, and natural-focal disease occurrence. The project will make projections of how changes will respond and interact under a range of climate and urban development scenarios.

Linnea Hedman

My name is Linnéa Hedman and I work as a researcher and project leader at the OLIN-studies in the Norrbotten region.

I am a behavioral scientist and associate professor in Epidemiology and Public health at Umeå University.

I primarily research teenage smoking - who starts to smoke, evaluation of tobacco preventive measures, and the connection between passive smoking and respiratory symptoms. I have also done research on the experience of people sick with chronic obstructive respiratory disease, who still cannot quit smoking. Beyond smoking, I have also done research on life quality amongst teens suffering from asthma.

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Klas-Göran Sahlen

Klas-Göran Sahlen is Deputy head of the Department and chair of the Program Council for the Master Programs in Public Health (PRPH).

Research mainly in health economics and health related preventive actions.

Lars Weinehall

Lars Weinehall is professor at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

He has amongst other things done research on type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, aging and health inequalities.

Ann Öhman

Ann Öhman is Professor at Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).

She has, amongst other things, done research on elderly care in Northern Sweden.

Health & inequality

Sören Edvinsson

Sören Edvinsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at Centre for Demographic and Aging Research at Umeå University (CEDAR).

My research has mainly focused on different aspects of health and mortality in history, in particular social inequalities in health with a focus on northern Sweden.

Urban Janlert

Urban Janlert is professor emeritus of Public Health, specialist in Social Medicine. 

He does research in social epidemiology (unemployment, social deprivation).

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Miguel San Sebastian

I coordinate the Norrland Observatory for Equity in Health and Health Care (NOEHHC) which monitors socioeconomic inequalities in health and health care in northern Sweden.

I am also health research leader at Várdduo-Center for Sami Research.

Lars Weinehall

Lars Weinehall is professor at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

He has amongst other things done research on type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, aging and health inequalities.

Maria Wiklund

Maria Wiklund is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She has done research, amongst other things, on health inequalites, health related to gender, mental health and body perception, with a special focus on youth.

Infections

Clas Ahlm

Clas Ahlm is professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

He does research on infectious diseases, for example viruses' which are spread through mosquitos in the Arctic area.

Birgitta Evengård

Birgitta Evengård is professor and senior physician at the Department of Clinical Microbiology and head of the unit for Infecious diseases.

Climate change will have a profound and rapid impact on the human biome. As climate change occurs at the fastest speed and also with the highest impact in the North this perspective is a rewarding one to study. The human biome in the Norths includes the change in the flora and fauna, all transforming the pretexts for development of societies in the North. A holistic approach including collaboration with many scholars is necessary.

Maria Furberg

Maria Furberg is a physician at the infection clinic at Norrland’s University Hospital in Umeå.

She is a specialist in infectious disease and medicine and has a doctorate in epidemiology with a thesis about climate change and health with focus on northern Sweden.

I research if assumed climate sensitive zoonotic infections, first and foremost tularaemia (rabbit fever). Climate sensitive infections respect no boundaries, and surveillance and research around these diseases need to be done through international cooperation. In the Arctic Council group ICS – International Circumpolar Surveillance –, where I sit as Sweden’s representative in the steering group, as well as co-chair in the working group for climate sensitive infectious diseases, we share and compile data and information about select infections from the Arctic countries and regions. I have a particular interest in Arctic indigenous populations who are especially exposed to climate change and zoonotic infections, and in many Arctic countries are socially neglected groups.

Mental health

Lars Jacobsson

Lars Jacobsson is affiliated as professor emeritus at the Department of Clinical Studies, at the psychiatry unit.

For many years I have worked with mental health in several different environments, including Africa, Central America and countries in Eastern Europe. During later years I have, together with several postgraduate students, researched the mental health issues of Swedish Sami with particular focus on suicide issues. In connection with this I have also collaborated with scientists and clinicians in Norway, Finland and Russia to further develop the work being made on suicide prevention among Sami.

Maria Wiklund

Maria Wiklund is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She has done research, amongst other things, on health inequalites, health related to gender, mental health and body perception, with a special focus on youth.

Mortality

Kristin Ahlm

Kristin Ahlm is affiliated to the Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

She has done research on mortality in relation to different parameters, for an example unnatural deaths within reindeer herding Sámi families.

Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Karin Hellström Ängerud

Karin Hällström Ängerud is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research primarily on cardiovascular disease and mortality.

Erling Häggström Lundevaller

I am a statistician working at the Centre for Demographic and Aging Research (CEDAR) and the Statistics Department and also affiliated with Stockholm University's demographic unit, SUDA.

My research interests mainly relate to different demographic issues. One of these is the impact of climate on mortality, with special attention being paid to differences between different groups, for example between Sami and the rest of the population.


Another research focus is what effect disability has had on individuals' life trajectories both in historical and modern times and how other factors such as gender and social group influence the effect.


Another focus is the influence of genetics on demographic processes where I studied the effects of the blood group Rh- and inbreeding.
As statistical tools, I use methods that enable analysis from a system perspective such as micro simulation and sequence analysis. These methods can often illustrate problems in a more realistic way.


In my research I use both historical data from parish records and modern data from registers that illustrate living conditions and health. Sweden's unique historical data can provide an insight into what life was like in the past.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Ulf Nilsson

Ulf Nilsson is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the  section of Medicine.

He researches, amongst other things, cardiovascular health, obesity and mortality.

Margareta Norberg

The Arctic dimension in my research has two legs. First, evaluations based on data from the county wide Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) regarding [...]

prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), with a special focus on the social gap in health including differencies in health between inland and coastland populations and  between men and wome. Second, VIPVIZA, a randomized controlled trial nested in VIP and primary care. VIPVIZA evaluates the potential of pictorial information  about  individual´s actual subclinical atherosclerosis, as compared to conventional statistical risk evaluation based on risk factors such as smoking and high blood lipids, to improve CVD prevention. The broad range of data renders a unique potential to understand barriers and facilitators of evidence based CVD prevention among both individuals and the professions, through evaluation of the interplay between social, psychological and behavioral factors as well as biomarkers and ultrasound based morphological data in the atherosclerotic process leading to CVD. This is expected to contribute to development of better preventive methods, and in the long run reduction of premature CVDs and the social gap in health.

Monika Norberg

Monika Norberg is lecturer at the Department of Nursing.

Her research is about breast cancer survivorship and the genered discourse surrounding the subject.

Mona Olofsson

Mona Olofsson is affiliated as biomedical technician at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the section of medicine.

She does research on cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

Barbara Schumann

Associate Professor; PhD in epidemiology. Research focus on weather and climate change impacts on human health.

Ongoing studies on weather-related mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition, using historical population and weather records, and on the role of oppressive weather types on mortality and morbidity in contemporary and future Sweden.

Lars Weinehall

Lars Weinehall is professor at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

He has amongst other things done research on type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, aging and health inequalities.

Nutrition

Stina Bodén

Stina Bodén is a postgraduate student at the Department of Radiation Sciences, the unit for oncology. She says the following about her research:

In my postgraduate project I study the inflammatory effect of nutritional intake amongst individuals in northern Sweden in relation to the risk of getting cancer, in particular colon cancer. We use poll data and blood tests from participants in Norra Sveriges Hälsoundersökningar (VIP and MONICA) to examine these connections.

Maria Waling

I'm an associate professor and head of the department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science. 

My main research focus is on different aspects of children's food habits. The past years my main focus has been on school lunch with a focus on the Nordic countries. I am also involved in a research project where a Paleolithic diet and exercise is tested on adults with type 2 diabetes. I mainly teach in classes regarding children's food habits, dietary assessment methods and scientific methods. In 2018 I was rewarded with a price from "Kunliga Skytteanska Samfundet" which is a price that a young, successful researcher at Umeå University receives.

Occupational health

Kåre Eriksson

Kåre Eriksson is affiliated as associate professor at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

My research is about biomarkers for vibraton-induced white fingers. I also work on assessing exposure to the respiratory irritant substance trichloramine in a bathhouse environment.

Karl Forsell

My research is about work environment for seafarers. 

During last years, there has been an increase in the ship traffic through the Northeast passage between Europe and Asia made possible by decreasing ice in the Arctic. The work environment for seafarers operating the area is however poorly investigated.

Sofia Karlsson

Within my thesis project I study the Swedish crisis medicine preparedness for large accidents in underground mines.

In Sweden, the nine Swedish underground mines are localized to the northern and middle parts of the country. The mines’ subarctic geographical location means that there is a limited amount of available emergency response units, as well as relatively long travel times in cold climates.

All three organizations (mine, emergency response and ambulance) play a major part in the implementation of the rescue scenario. A scenario below ground means long, dark, cold and often moist environments, where emergency personnel need to navigate an environment which is tough to overview. The mining crews have knowledge of the inaccessible environment as well access to resources which are needed in these scenarios. Emergency personnel can perform carry through the rescue below ground in collaboration with the mining crews, with paramedics taking care of the injured. Collaboration is thereby a leading word of my thesis project.

Ingrid Liljelind

Ingrid Liljelind is a certified working environment hygienist at the unit for working environment medicine, Region Västerbotten and [...]

is adjuct associate professor and researcher at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

In my work as a working environment hygienist I meet workers who have been exposed to cold environments in their work, often in combination with vibrating machinery, for example rock drills, saws and multitools. My research interest therefor has been to study how cold working environments affect health, with focus especially on hands and fingers. Our research group has created a cohort with focus on cold and health in Norrland (CHINS – Cold and Health in Northern Sweden), in which about 12 600 respondents in the northern region take part. Another part of my research is construction-related illness (BRO). Our cold climate set certain demands on the buildings we inhabit, and this also relates to the indoor environment.

Ronnie Lundström

Ronne Lundström is affiliated as professor emeritus at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, and engaged in [...]

the project ”Cold and Health in Northern Sweden" (CHINS) which investigates health in relation to a cold working environment and vibrating tools.

Tohr Nilsson

Tohr Nilsson is associate professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about hand-arm injuries caused from using vibrating/shaking tools in cold environments.

Hans Pettersson

Hans Pettersson is a researcher at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, section of Sustainable Health. He says the following about his research:

The goal with my research is to improve work environment and health amongst workers. Above all I work with work environments in building- and mining industries but also other industries in northern Sweden. A lot of workers in these industries work and live in a sub-arctic climate with long and cold winters. I research how work environment in cold climates affect worker’s health and how work environment can be reformed so that health issues can be avoided. Focus within my field of research about work in a cold environment has been how sense of touch and blood circulation in hands and fingers can become more impaired in a cold climate amongst workers who are subjected to vibrations from hand-held vibrating machines such as chainsaws, sanding machines and jackhammers. Further, I study how noise and work in a cold climate amongst building workers can increase the risk for heart-disease.

Anita Pettersson-Strömbäck

Anita does research about work and health in Sweden, especially the northern parts of the country, which have a clear arctic cultural-geographic connection. She says the following:

Sparsely populated areas, small societies, ageing populations, brain drain, long winters with snow, cold and darkness puts differents demands on how work must be organized to contribute to good health. One example is the Norräng school where I and my colleague Maria Nordin follow one low- and middle mandatory school which has hired a new category of personnel, class mentors, to free up teacher work hours when it comes to the school's mission to teach. A first report of our findings can be found here.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Public health & prevention

Hanna Blåhed

Political scientist with a master’s degree in Public Health.

Holds an interest in Arctic health. At present working with a Health Impact Assessment regarding the potential mine establishment in Gállok/Kallak which connects to Indigenous health.

Mats Eliasson

Mats Eliasson is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine. Senior counsultant at the Medical Department, Sunderby Hospital.

My research is about the presence of myocardial infarction and stroke in the Norrbotten and Västerbotten regions. The past few years we have analyzed the levels of D-vitamin in the population, with the idea that we who live far in the north with long periods of darkness during the year possibly could have lower levels of D-vitamin. However, our first results showed that D-vitamin deficiency was rare even during winter. Together with Dr. Viktor Oskarsson in Piteå we are broadening these analyzes to compare our data with other regions in Europe. We also study change over time for the male hormone testosterone, where international reports are describing falling levels over time among adult men.

Anders Eriksson

Anders Eriksson is senior professor at the  Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and head of the Forensic Medicine unit.

Since the end of the 1970's, my research has focused mostly on injury analysis and injury prevention. When it comes to studies with an Arctic dimension I have performed studies of snow mobile and ATV crashes, road traffic deaths, hypothermia deaths, the value of ambulance helicopters in rural areas, heightened mortality risk after accidental injuries in rural areas, deaths in relation to hunting, deaths in sauna bathing, risks related to snowy roofs, car-moose collisions, etcetera. Disease focused studies with regional dimensions include morphological studies of familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy, studies of natural deaths in road traffic, as well as of cesium affliction on the northern population after the Chernobyl incident.

Kåre Eriksson

Kåre Eriksson is affiliated as associate professor at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

My research is about biomarkers for vibraton-induced white fingers. I also work on assessing exposure to the respiratory irritant substance trichloramine in a bathhouse environment.

Maria Furberg

Maria Furberg is a physician at the infection clinic at Norrland’s University Hospital in Umeå.

She is a specialist in infectious disease and medicine and has a doctorate in epidemiology with a thesis about climate change and health with focus on northern Sweden.

I research if assumed climate sensitive zoonotic infections, first and foremost tularaemia (rabbit fever). Climate sensitive infections respect no boundaries, and surveillance and research around these diseases need to be done through international cooperation. In the Arctic Council group ICS – International Circumpolar Surveillance –, where I sit as Sweden’s representative in the steering group, as well as co-chair in the working group for climate sensitive infectious diseases, we share and compile data and information about select infections from the Arctic countries and regions. I have a particular interest in Arctic indigenous populations who are especially exposed to climate change and zoonotic infections, and in many Arctic countries are socially neglected groups.

Lina Gyllencreutz

Lina Gyllencreutz is associate professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Nursing.

She does research mostly on accidents and crisis medicine, especially involving children, and elderly in outdoors environments.

Michael Haney

Michael Haney is head of the unit for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.

He has foremostly done research on crisis medicine and emergency response care.

Urban Janlert

Urban Janlert is professor emeritus of Public Health, specialist in Social Medicine. 

He does research in social epidemiology (unemployment, social deprivation).

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Hanne Krage Carlsen

Hanna Krage Carlsen is affiliated as postdoctoral position at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, at the Section of Sustainable Health.

She does research on air pollution from traffic and how it affects health.

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Maria Nilsson

Maria Nilsson is research fellow at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

My research is in the field of climate change and health. My main interest is climate adaptation, climate communication and policy development.

Margareta Norberg

The Arctic dimension in my research has two legs. First, evaluations based on data from the county wide Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) regarding [...]

prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), with a special focus on the social gap in health including differencies in health between inland and coastland populations and  between men and wome. Second, VIPVIZA, a randomized controlled trial nested in VIP and primary care. VIPVIZA evaluates the potential of pictorial information  about  individual´s actual subclinical atherosclerosis, as compared to conventional statistical risk evaluation based on risk factors such as smoking and high blood lipids, to improve CVD prevention. The broad range of data renders a unique potential to understand barriers and facilitators of evidence based CVD prevention among both individuals and the professions, through evaluation of the interplay between social, psychological and behavioral factors as well as biomarkers and ultrasound based morphological data in the atherosclerotic process leading to CVD. This is expected to contribute to development of better preventive methods, and in the long run reduction of premature CVDs and the social gap in health.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Ulf Näslund

Ulf is Head of Department at the Institution of Public Health and Clinical Medicine and Professor of Cardiology at Umeå University. He says the following about his Arctic research:

The Arctic dimension in my research is the large VIPVIZA study program and within VIP (Västerbotten Intervention Programme) about prevention from coast to Lapland with a decentralized and personalized perspective, particularly to tackle the main obstacle for prevention of cardiovascular disease – the non-adherence problem – non-adherence by individuals to recommendations about life style and medication and by health professionals to follow guideline recommendations.

Olena Rzhepishevska

I am a microbiologist/molecular biologist. I am affiliated research fellow at the Clinical Microbiology Department and work as a senior research engineer at the Chemistry Department, UmU.

My PhD project was about metabolism of acidophilic & psychrophilic (acid & clod-loving) bacteria from Arctic environments.

Now I work with several projects using metabolomics for biomarker research in infectious diseases, understanding of mixed bacterial biofilms in clinical and biotechnological settings, effect of antibiotics and some other. Here you can see most of my scientific publications.

I am very interested in tuberculosis (TB): drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and biomarkers of TB in human. TB is not only a biomedical issue but also a complex social phenomenon. In 2016, I joined TBnet, a European network of clinical researchers who work with TB. In TBnet I am responsible for Advocacy.

In Arctic countries and in Eastern Europe (with Russia being both Arctic & Eastern European country) TB is still very prevalent and access to healthcare and its quality is still an issue. By my research, I try to improve diagnostic and treatment and advocate for more support to people and countries affected by TB. In Umea, I am a co-organizer of Arctic Meetings on Clinical TB.

Klas-Göran Sahlen

Klas-Göran Sahlen is Deputy head of the Department and chair of the Program Council for the Master Programs in Public Health (PRPH).

Research mainly in health economics and health related preventive actions.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Marcus Schmitt-Egenolf

Marcus is professor and chief physician at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

His main research interests are melanomia and psoriasis, diseases who are directly affected by the climate.

Sven Arne Silfverdal

Sven Arne Silfverdal is associate professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Sciences, at the unit for Professional Development, Pediatrics.

He works foremostly with children’s health and diseases. In an Arctic context he has amongst other things written about D-vitamin deficiency in people living in northern areas.

Annika Toots

Annika Toots is affiliated as other position at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She does research primarily on aging related health issues, for instance gait speed.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Jens Wahlström

Jens Wahlström wants to provide more knowledge about how cold exposure affects health, especially with a focus on the working life in order to prevent ill-health.

In the CHINS-study, 'Cold and Health in Northern Sweden', a questionnaire was answered by more than 12 000 subjects and results showed that cold exposure is common in northern Sweden, both during work and leisure time, and frostbite in the hands was reported by 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, also cold-related neurovascular hand symptoms were commonly reported.

Sports

Christer Malm

Christer Malm is Professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Sports Medicine.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about blood doping, which is widely spread within cross country skiing, and also involves stays at high altitudes.

Rita Sjöström

Rita Sjöström is adjunct associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

The Arctic dimensions of her research includes research on tuberculosis, how cold affects health, as well as exercise in cold environments.

Nikolai Stenfors

Nikolai works at the Department of Public Health & Clinical Medicine. He says the following about his research:

My research program "Cold, physical activity and respiratory systems" studies the connection between physical activity in cold environments and respiratory health. The long term goal is to improve diagnostics, treatment and prevention of cold-related respiratory problems within the populance. The research program consists of poll inquiries, clinical patient studies and experimental studies in a cold environment chamber.

Welfare & well-being

Margareta Brännström

Margareta Brännström is associate professor at the Department of Nursing at Campus Skellefteå. 

She researches palliative care in the North.

Fredrik Elgh

Fredrik Elgh is a Professor and senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Microbiology.

My research is about the herpes virus and it's role in the development of Alzheimers disease. Earlier research includes viral zoonosis' - that is, virus diseases which spread between animals and humans, as well as the role of the Flu virus throughout history.

Åsa Hörnsten

Åsa Hörnsten is a professor at the Department of Nursing. She says the following about her research:

Our research group conducts research on health and well-being, as well as experiences of chronic disease, first and foremost type 2 diabetes which is endemic disease, as well as self-care and self-care support. To give adequate self-care support it is required that one understand how the person with for an example diabetes understands their disease. Personal understanding models or explanation models have been studied by anthropologists amongst native peoples in e.g. Australia and Northern America where custom education has been tried that takes into consideration traditions and cultural aspects. This can be about e.g. traditions around food and physical activity or perspectives on medication or disease in general, which affects how necessary self-care can be applied. No studies except ours have studied how persons in northern Sweden understand their own disease. From this knowledge we have amongst other things developed a model for self-care support in group aimed at persons with type 2 diabetes, as well as a screening instrument to understand people’s basis for efficient self-care, and also we have developed a webpage.

Ulf Isaksson

Ulf Isaksson is Associate professor at Department of Nursing and is [...]

specialized in the subjects of elderly care, especially with the care of elderly with dementia or behavioural changes, so called BPSD. He has also done research into e-health. His research is foremostly into the elderly, self-care as well as E-health with a rural perspective. He is also engaged in psychometrics where he currently leads a master-student within the HALDI-project.

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Nina Lindelöf

Nina Lindelöf is associate professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the units Physiotherapy, and Geriatric Medicine.

She does research primarily on geriatric care, and how physical training/physiotherapy affects the elderly.

Christer Malm

Christer Malm is Professor at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Sports Medicine.

The Arctic dimension of his research is about blood doping, which is widely spread within cross country skiing, and also involves stays at high altitudes.

Beatrice Melin

Beatrice Melin is professor in Molecular epidemiology of cancer, at the Department of Radiation Sciences.

Some cancer sites are aggregated in families in the Northern region of Sweden. Our aim is to identify the etiological causes to these types of cancer including among other whole genome sequencing.  My research focus is on glioma a malignant brain tumor but I also study hematological diseases and colorectal cancer. By using cases and controls from a very defined arctic population that have specific gene pool we hope to understand the causes of cancer. 

Nawi Ng

Nawi Ng is a Guest Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Umeå University. He is currently [...]

working as a Professor of Global Health at the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

My research focuses on non-communicable diseases, ageing and disability in Sweden and in low- and middle-income countries. I am conducting research using the Västerbotten Intervention Programme data. We investigate how life course socioeconomic trajectories influence the trajectories of behavioural risk factors, and subsequently morbidities and mortality among adult population in the Västerbotten County. I am leading a multidisciplinary research team in the Forte Research Programme at Umeå University to develop digital coaching for promoting sustainable behaviour change in Västerbotten County. The research involves researchers from four faculties at Umeå University and a strong collaboration with the Region Västerbotten. My global research work covers inequities in health care utilisation among older people in Myanmar, integration of tuberculosis, diabetes and smoking prevention program in India and Indonesia, as well as disability and quality of life among older people in low- and middle-income countries.

Ingeborg Nilsson

The research we do aims to measure, understand and explain activity engagement, ergo what people do, in the later stages of their lives.

Beyond that we do research to develop efficient activity-based projects to support a healthy aging. The research focuses mostly on the aging population of northern Sweden where many people age in sparsely populated areas with long geographical distances, where social services aren’t as readily available as in cities, and where the share of elderly people are often higher than in other parts of Sweden. These projects we develop therefor need to be adjusted to fit these specific prerequisites, whereby end users are often included in the research process and that digital technology can be used as a tool.

Lena Maria Nilsson

I work as a research coordinator at the Arctic Research Centre (60%), and at Várdduo, the Centre for Sami Research (20%) where I also work as Deputy Director.

I hold a PhD in public health (2012), with my thesis focusing on traditional Sami lifestyle factors as determinants of health. In autumn 2012 I was in involved in an Arctic food and water security project, initiated by the The Arctic Human Health Experts Group within the Arctic Council. So far, this project has resulted in one report, two book chapters, six journal papers and continuing research collaborations on food security in the Arctic. As of March 2020, my total scientific production included 67 peer reviewed papers, and eight book chapters. In 2016, I was the first 2016 laureate of the “Eva de la Gardie” Research Residency, a mobility program organized in collaboration between Institut Francais de Suède (IFS) and Institut Suédois in Paris in order to improve cooperation between France and Sweden. I am the secretary of the Nordic Society for Circumpolar Health, and a member of the steering group of Neon, the Nordic Nutrition Epidemiological Network. Based on my broad expertise, I am often invited to speak to both scientific and public audiences, including four key note lectures at large International conferences.

Maria Nilsson

Maria Nilsson is research fellow at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

My research is in the field of climate change and health. My main interest is climate adaptation, climate communication and policy development.

Anna Nordström

Anna Nordström is adjunct professor at the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, the section of Sustainable Health.

She amongst other things works with developing a cooling hat to be used to hasten healing of brain injuries.

Ann-Christine Petersson Hjelm

Ann-Christine is associate professor at the Department of Law, and has studied [...]

power relations in Nordic elderly care, and the ways in which elderly negotiate power relations in the face of for an example New Public Governance.

Klas-Göran Sahlen

Klas-Göran Sahlen is Deputy head of the Department and chair of the Program Council for the Master Programs in Public Health (PRPH).

Research mainly in health economics and health related preventive actions.

Sven Arne Silfverdal

Sven Arne Silfverdal is associate professor, senior consultant (attending) physician at Department of Clinical Sciences, at the unit for Professional Development, Pediatrics.

He works foremostly with children’s health and diseases. In an Arctic context he has amongst other things written about D-vitamin deficiency in people living in northern areas.

Albin Stjernbrandt

My research project aims to describe how the working population in northern Sweden is exposed to cold, using an epidemiological approach. I want to investigate if there is [...]

a link between high exposure to ambient cold and different health outcomes. I primarily study how the vascular and neural function of the hands is affected by cold exposure. Also, I want to see if there are other factors contributing to the outcomes, such as tobacco use, high exposure to hand-arm vibration, hereditary factors, or certain diseases.

The project also includes laboratory studies on volunteers. In these experiments, we investigate the vascular and neural function of the hands using various methods with high precision, including thermal quantitative sensory testing and laser Doppler flow measurements. One of the purposes of the studies is to determine whether there are disturbances in the regulation of the blood flow in the skin of subjects who experience cold sensitivity or Raynaud's phenomenon.

The research has an arctic approach since we investigate the exposure patterns of people living in a subarctic climate. Previous research has shown that some populations in these areas, such as the Sámi and Inuits, have particularly good cold adaptation capabilities. In our studies, we seek to understand these mechanisms in greater detail.

Åsa Strinnholm

Åsa Strinnholm is affiliated as research nurse at Department of Clinical Sciences.

Her speciality is research on food allergies and food hypersensitivty amongst children and youth.

Annika Toots

Annika Toots is affiliated as other position at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, at the unit for Physiotherapy.

She does research primarily on aging related health issues, for instance gait speed.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Anders Wänman

Anders Wänman is professor, senior consultant dentist at Department of Odontology.

He is head of the department, and has previously done research on dental health amongst Sámi women.

Inger Öhlund

Inger Öhlund is affiliated as research fellow at Department of Clinical Sciences, at the unit for Pediatrics.

She does research mainly on nutrition amongst children.

Substance abuse

Kristin Ahlm

Kristin Ahlm is affiliated to the Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

She has done research on mortality in relation to different parameters, for an example unnatural deaths within reindeer herding Sámi families.

Annika Nordström

Annika Nordström is adjunct associate professor at Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.

Her research is about social service issues in different groups, for an example alcoholism in some reindeer herding Sámi families.

E-health

Kurt Boman

Professor, senior at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

Telemedicine Projects, especially Storuman Health care center, with Peter Berggren and Mante Hedman.

Anette Edin-Liljegren

Anette Edin-Liljegren, BMA, adjunct associate professor at the Department of Nursing and research coordinator/researcher at the Rural medicine centre, [...]

FOU-staff in Region Västerbotten and FOU-head within the hospital care area of Southern Lapland. I am also associated as researcher at LIME, Innovative care at the Caroline Institute (KI).

After my thesis within clinical chemistry at Gothenburg University my research has been about the health situation of the Sámi, especially amongst reindeer herders and their working environment since the year 2000, for starters at the Stiftelsen Glesbygdens research unit in southern Lapland. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease, life quality, psychosocial health, work related health as well as trust in the healthcare system has been some of the areas which I have studied together with Sámi representatives and other researchers. I am also the head supervisor for the doctoral student project “Sámi and care in palliative care – knowledge about traditions to develop the care of the future”.

At the Rural medicine centre we study different solutions for a high quality and close care in municipalities and regions. My research is now about digital care meetings, social rooms and continuity in the healthcare system.

Åsa Hörnsten

Åsa Hörnsten is a professor at the Department of Nursing. She says the following about her research:

Our research group conducts research on health and well-being, as well as experiences of chronic disease, first and foremost type 2 diabetes which is endemic disease, as well as self-care and self-care support. To give adequate self-care support it is required that one understand how the person with for an example diabetes understands their disease. Personal understanding models or explanation models have been studied by anthropologists amongst native peoples in e.g. Australia and Northern America where custom education has been tried that takes into consideration traditions and cultural aspects. This can be about e.g. traditions around food and physical activity or perspectives on medication or disease in general, which affects how necessary self-care can be applied. No studies except ours have studied how persons in northern Sweden understand their own disease. From this knowledge we have amongst other things developed a model for self-care support in group aimed at persons with type 2 diabetes, as well as a screening instrument to understand people’s basis for efficient self-care, and also we have developed a webpage.

Ulf Isaksson

Ulf Isaksson is Associate professor at Department of Nursing and is [...]

specialized in the subjects of elderly care, especially with the care of elderly with dementia or behavioural changes, so called BPSD. He has also done research into e-health. His research is foremostly into the elderly, self-care as well as E-health with a rural perspective. He is also engaged in psychometrics where he currently leads a master-student within the HALDI-project.

Frida Jonsson

Frida Jonsson has a PhD in public health and currently holds a position as postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. 

Her research focuses largely on how access to and experiences of health and social care can be improved for people - especially youth and elderly - living and working in rural areas of northern Sweden, for example by studying ways through which eHealth can strengthen community health systems in this region. In this regard, her research centres a lot around complex interventions and their implementation, an issue that she usually approach from a theory-driven evaluation perspective.

Helena Lindgren

My research focuses on personalised intelligent (semi-autonomous) systems for improving health and facilitating activity (work and pleasure) in spite of personal or environmental barriers.

I consider for example Arctic aspects such as sparsley populated regions, high proportion of older population, climate and long distances to services.

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez is research fellow at the Department of Computing Science.

He has done research, amongst other things, in e-health and the possibilities of augumented reality technology to improve medication use at home.

Karin Wadell

Karin Wadell is professor, combined with clinical employment at Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.

I'm a physiotherapist with a speciality in respiration. I work with research, education and clinical work.

Ulrika Öberg

Ulrika Öberg is Lecturer at Department of Nursing and is specialized in [...]

research around self-care through e-health technologies for patients with type 2 diabetes.

Health technologies

Jonas Alex

I work with research and development, as well as the specialist education, on ambulance healthcare. I am an expert within:

  • Thermic comfort
  • Hypothermia
  • Prehospital patient safety
  • Police emergency healthcare
  • Crisis medicine
Kurt Boman

Professor, senior at Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.

Telemedicine Projects, especially Storuman Health care center, with Peter Berggren and Mante Hedman.

Helena Lindgren

My research focuses on personalised intelligent (semi-autonomous) systems for improving health and facilitating activity (work and pleasure) in spite of personal or environmental barriers.

I consider for example Arctic aspects such as sparsley populated regions, high proportion of older population, climate and long distances to services.

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez

Juan Carlos Nieves Sanchez is research fellow at the Department of Computing Science.

He has done research, amongst other things, in e-health and the possibilities of augumented reality technology to improve medication use at home.

Britt-Inger Saveman

Britt-Inger Saveman is professor at the Department of Nursing.

Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers' perceptions and injury preventive practices (2020)

Preparedness of Swedish EMS Personnel for Major Incidents in Underground Mines (2018)

The opinions of ambulance personnel regarding using a heated mattress for patients being cared for in a cold climate - An intervention study in ambulance care (2017)

Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study (2017)

Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services (2017)

Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers (2017)

Ulrika Öberg

Ulrika Öberg is Lecturer at Department of Nursing and is specialized in [...]

research around self-care through e-health technologies for patients with type 2 diabetes.

Toxicology

Gunnar Nordberg

Gunnar Nordberg does research at the unit for Working environment medicine since 1979, about the toxicology and epidemiology of metals as well as indoor pollutants (trichloramine).

I am interested in energy and health i.e. the risks of negative health consequences of different energy systems. An Arctic dimension of my research has been to look at the risks for human health in connection to pollutants from industry in Northern Sweden – amongst them the industrial area Rönnskärsverket.