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Published: 25 Feb, 2020

Algorithms that generate algorithms

PROFILE Professor Bientinesi's research focuses on mathematical computations that arise in disciplines such as biology, chemistry, data science and materials science, and aims at achieving simultaneously both human productivity and computer efficiency.

Text: Kommunikationsenheten

As computers become increasingly powerful, it becomes more and more challenging to take advantage of their potential. Scientists and engineers are constantly facing the dilemma of whether to invest months in the development of sophisticated and efficient code, or to opt for code that is quick to generate, but severely suboptimal in terms of performance. In the first case, computer efficiency comes at the cost of human productivity; in the second case, human productivity comes at the expense of time and energy wasted.

Professor Bientinesi's research focuses on mathematical computations that arise in disciplines such as biology, chemistry, data science and materials science, and aims at achieving simultaneously both human productivity and computer efficiency. The objective is to allow domain experts to easily express their problems with a computer language, and then have computers – and not humans – automatically generate efficient code. Automation lowers computing costs, and at the same time allows scientists to perform more science.

Paolo Bientinesi was installed as professor for High-Performance Computing in the Department of Computing Science at Umeå University in November 2019.

About Paolo Bientinesi's research

Biography

Paolo Bientinesi was born in 1973 in Livorno, Italy. He studied computer science at the University of Pisa, and at The University of Texas at Austin, where he received his Ph.D. in 2006. In 2007-2008, he was a research associate at Duke University, and between 2008 and 2018, he was professor at RWTH Aachen University (Germany).

His research interests are centered on computer automation, and range from numerical linear algebra to computer music. He was the recipient of the Karl Arnold Prize from the North Rhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences and Humanities.