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Published: 11 Oct, 2021

So can the heating system of a building help reduce carbon dioxide emissions and energy cost

NEWS With ground source heat pump system at Norrland University Hospital in Umeå it is possible to reduce the energy cost by 644 000 SEK per year while reducing the CO2 emissions by 92 tons. It is shown by Anjan Rao Puttige PhD student at the Department of Applied Physics and electronics and the Industrial Doctoral School at Umeå University.

Text: Ingrid Söderbergh

The results can help Umeå Energi to have better cooperation with building owners to provide heating and cooling.

Around 25 percent of the total energy produced in Sweden is used for the heating and cooling of buildings. Therefore, a sustainable heating system is an essential part of a sustainable energy system. Many building owners choose ground source heat pumps and/or district heating as sustainable heating solutions.

Anjan Rao Puttige’s study shows that integrating the two solutions and operating the ground source heat pumps in cooperation with the district heating network can benefit the district heating company and the building owners.

‘The results can help Umeå Energi to have better cooperation with building owners to provide heating and cooling,’ says he.

Anjan Rao Puttige has carried out his work at the Department of Applied Physics and Electronics and within the framework of the Industrial Doctoral School. His external party is Umeå Energi AB.

The hospital in focus

Norrland University Hospital, NUS, was used as the case study in this thesis. The heating and cooling system at Norrland University Hospital includes a large ground source heat pump and district heating and cooling network. The thesis aimed to determine how to operate the ground source heat pump such that the cost of providing heating and cooling to the buildings can be minimized.

“Operating the ground source heat pump system to maximize the benefits from it without changing the temperature of the ground is a challenge. In our study, we addressed this challenge by developing reliable mathematical models of the heating system using measured data,” says Anjan Rao Puttige.

A combination of physics-based and data-driven models were used to simulate the operation of the ground source heat pump. The model was developed and validated using four years of measured data from the ground source heat pump at Norrland University Hospital. The model was used to determine the optimal operation of the ground source heat pump. In optimal operation, the cost of providing heating and cooling to the area was minimized while maintaining a stable temperature in the ground.

The methods and models developed in this thesis can be used in other buildings.

The thesis was financially supported by the Industrial doctoral school at Umeå University and Umeå Energi AB.

About the Industrial Doctoral School:

The Industrial Doctoral School is an inter-faculty research school that is based on collaboration between Umeå University and an organisation or a company. IDS aims to promote collaboration in order to strengthen research and development, increase the doctoral students’ employability, independence and innovative capacity, and increase knowledge and innovation in society.

www.umu.se/en/industrialdoctoralschool

About the dissertation:

On Tuesday 19 October Anjan Rao Puttige, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics at Umeå University defends his thesis entitled: Utilization of a GSHP System in a DHC Network: modeling and optimization.

The dissertation takes place in room Triple Helix in Samverkanshuset at Umeå University at 13:00

Faculty opponent is Docent Saqib Javed, Department of Building and Environmental Technology, Lund University.

The defense is in hybrid form, both physical and via Zoom:

https://umu.zoom.us/j/61884590547

For more information, please contact:

Anjan Rao Puttige
Research student
E-mail
Email