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Bacterial Lifestyles – Choices and Weaponry

Bacteria communicate with each other and behave as either individuals and act as multi-cell and/or multi-species communities. Through signalling molecules, they can also cross-talk with eukaryotic hosts. Bacteria deploy a whole armoury of devices within these processes, ranging from modulation of gene expression and their cell wall composition to production of specialized nano-machines to combat predators and competitors and deliver virulence factors into host-cells. Our research includes elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms within these processes which are important for both human and environmental health.

Gemma Atkinson: Functional evolution of (p)ppGpp-synthesising/hydrolysing stress response proteins and ABCF translation and antibiotic resistance factors

Felipe Cava: Bacterial cell wall composition and its contribution to long-standing and emerging infectious diseases

Åke Forsberg: Molecular mechanism of Type III secretion systems

Matthew Francis: Molecular insights into Yersinia-target cell contact: envelope stress and mechanisms of pathogenesis

Maria Fällman: Molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial persistence in host tissue

Martin Gullberg: Molecular mechanisms of mechano-transcriptional activators

Vasili Hauryliuk: Ribosome-associated factors involved in stress responses and antibiotic resistance

Debra Milton: Bacterial small-talk

Andrea Puhar: ATP as danger signal during intestinal infection and inflammation

Linda Sandblad: Structure, assembly and cellular organization of the cytoskeleton

Victoria Shingler: Bacterial Signal-Sensing and Integration

Barbara Sixt: Cell-autonomous immunity

Microbial Infection Biology

Microbes – bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites – are nanometre- to micron-sized organisms that have a profound impact on human health. Some microbes are "accidental tourists" – so called opportunistic pathogens, while others are dedicated pathogens. Yet others, have complex lifecycles that involve intermediary transmission hosts. Basic research underscores our effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in these aspects of pathogenicity to provide new strategies for prevention and treatment of infection diseases.

Gemma Atkinson: Functional evolution of (p)ppGpp-synthesising/hydrolysing stress response proteins and ABCF translation and antibiotic resistance factors

Sven Bergström: Infection and virulence properties of Borrelia spirochetes, and the role of birds in the biology and ecology of tick-transmitted zoonoses

Oliver Billker: Malaria parasite transmission and reproduction in mosquitoes

Ellen Bushell: Molecular mechanisms of malaria parasite-host interactions

Felipe Cava: Bacterial cell wall composition and its contribution to long-standing and emerging infectious diseases

Åke Forsberg: Molecular mechanism of Type III secretion systems

Matthew Francis: Molecular insights into Yersinia-target cell contact: envelope stress and mechanisms of pathogenesis

Teresa Frisan: Role of bacterial genotoxins in modulation of intestinal mucosa homeostasis

Maria Fällman: Molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial persistence in host tissue

Vasili Hauryliuk: Ribosome-associated factors involved in stress responses and antibiotic resistance

Dan Hultmark: Drosophila cellular innate immunity, and mechanisms of persistent viral infections

Jörgen Johansson: Stress regulatory mechanisms and RNA-mediated regulation in the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogen

Christer Larsson: Novel strategies to fight Tuberculosis

Andrea Puhar: ATP as danger signal during intestinal infection and inflammation

Barbara Sixt: Cell-autonomous immunity

Ulrich von Pawel-Rammingen: Streptococcal IgG degrading proteases: Important virulence factors and biotechnological tools

Victoria Shingler: Bacterial Signal-Sensing and Integration

Bernt Eric Uhlin: Regulatory networks in commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli

Sun Nyunt Wai: Exploring modulation of host cell signalling mediated by secreted bacterial factors

Genetics, Epigenetics and Evolution

A major challenge in biology is to link genomic variations to biological functions. Differences in gene sequences together with how, when and where genes are activated and expressed result in differences among individuals and species. Comparative sequence analysis allows us to, for example, predict novel antibiotic resistance determinants for experimental validation and retrace the molecular evolution of resistance factors from housekeeping genes. Using model organisms we study gene regulation, epigenetics, genome structure and function and their role in evolution. In our different projects we use classical genetic techniques combined with large scale sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis.

Gemma Atkinson: Functional evolution of (p)ppGpp-synthesising/hydrolysing stress response proteins and ABCF translation and antibiotic resistance factors

Vasili Hauryliuk: Ribosome-associated factors involved in stress responses and antibiotic resistance

Jan Larson: Chromosome-wide gene regulatory mechanisms

Peter Lind: Exploring the limits of evolutionary forecasting using bacterial populations

Åsa Rasmuson-Lestander: Gene silencing and regulation in Drosophila melanogaster

Yuri Schwartz: Molecular Epigenetics

Cell Growth and Disease

Eukaryotic cells are exposed to a diversity of stimulatory factors and danger signals that alter their growth trajectories. Stimulatory factors drive cell proliferation through modulation of tight transcriptional and translational control, while danger signal subvert growth and can even lead to cell death. Malfunctioning of these systems can promote inflammatory diseases and facilitate processes that ultimately lead to tumour and/or cancer progression.

Anders Byström: tRNA metabolism in eukaryotes

Saskia Erttmann: Insight into inflammatory diseases – understanding the molecular mechanisms during the onset and resolution of inflammation

Teresa Frisan: Role of bacterial genotoxins in modulation of intestinal mucosa homeostasis

Thomas Grundström: Control of mutagenesis and class switch recombination of antibody genes

Anders Nordström: Metabolomics as a tool to study drug resistance

Jenny Persson: Models and cellular pathways in cancer metastasis and targeted therapies

Andrea Puhar: ATP as danger signal during intestinal infection and inflammation

Cell Physiology and Development

Understanding cell physiology is a major task of basic molecular biology within many different research areas. Our research includes elucidating the development of the wiring of our senses, the underlying structural components that shape our cells, and the mechanisms of our immune systems. Such molecular-level understanding is required to decipher the workings of multicellular organisms and their transient and persistent interactions with microbes.

Mattias Alenius: Homeostatic control of olfaction and taste

Anna Berghard: Cell biology and physiology of the mammalian primary and accessory olfactory systems

Staffan Bohm: Establishment of functional and topographic identity of olfactory sensory neurons

Anders Byström: tRNA metabolism in eukaryotes

Saskia Erttmann: Insight into inflammatory diseases – understanding the molecular mechanisms during the onset and resolution of inflammation

Teresa Frisan: Role of bacterial genotoxins in modulation of intestinal mucosa homeostasis

Maria Fällman: Molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial persistence in host tissue

Dan Hultmark: Drosophila cellular innate immunity, and mechanisms of persistent viral infections

Linda Sandblad: Structure, assembly and cellular organization of the cytoskeleton

Sun Nyunt Wai: Exploring modulation of host cell signalling mediated by secreted bacterial factors