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Our Research Areas

Bacterial Lifestyles – Choices and Weaponry

Bacteria communicate with each other and behave as either individuals and act as multi-cell and/or multi-species communities. Through signalling molecules, they can also cross-talk with eukaryotic hosts. Bacteria deploy a whole armoury of devices within these processes, ranging from modulation of gene expression and their cell wall composition to production of specialized nano-machines to combat predators and competitors and deliver virulence factors into host-cells. Our research includes elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms within these processes which are important for both human and environmental health.

Researchers

Andrea Puhar
Research fellow
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Email
Felipe Cava
Professor, research fellow
E-mail
Email
Maria Fällman
Research fellow, professor
E-mail
Email

Research Groups and Projects

Matthew Francis Lab
The Francis laboratory has a strong interest in understanding the physiology and pathogenesis of bacteria.
Type of project Research group
Debra Milton Lab
Our group studies virulence and survival of the fish bacteria Vibrio anguillarum.
Type of project Research group
Barbara Sixt Group
Cell-autonomous immunity and bacterial evasion strategies
Type of project Research group
Felipe Cava Group
Bacterial cell wall composition and its contribution to long-standing and emerging infectious diseases.
Type of project Research group
Maria Fällman Lab
Molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial persistence in host tissue.
Type of project Research group
Andrea Puhar lab
Endogenous danger signals in infection and inflammation.
Type of project Research group
Victoria Shingler Lab
We do research about bacterial signal-sensing and Integration.
Type of project Research group
Microbe-induced antimicrobial responses in host cells -subverting effects of microbial virulence effectors
Type of project Research project
Duration 26 February 2007 until 31 December 2007

Microbial Infection Biology

Microbes – bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites – are nanometre- to micron-sized organisms that have a profound impact on human health. Some microbes are "accidental tourists" – so called opportunistic pathogens, while others are dedicated pathogens. Yet others, have complex lifecycles that involve intermediary transmission hosts. Basic research underscores our effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in these aspects of pathogenicity to provide new strategies for prevention and treatment of infection diseases.

Andrea Puhar
Research fellow
E-mail
Email
Dan Hultmark
Professor emeritus
E-mail
Email
Ellen Bushell
Research fellow
E-mail
Email
Felipe Cava
Professor, research fellow
E-mail
Email
Maria Fällman
Research fellow, professor
E-mail
Email
Oliver Billker
Research fellow, professor
E-mail
Email
Coalition Umeå for Life Science (CU4LS)
Life science research in Umeå is versatile, interdisciplinary and of high scientific competence. The Coalition Umeå for Life Science (CU4LS) is...
Type of project Forskarnätverk
Matthew Francis Lab
The Francis laboratory has a strong interest in understanding the physiology and pathogenesis of bacteria.
Type of project Research group
Ellen Bushell Lab
The group studies parasite-host interactions that govern malaria infection and disease.
Type of project Research group
Barbara Sixt Group
Cell-autonomous immunity and bacterial evasion strategies
Type of project Research group
Felipe Cava Group
Bacterial cell wall composition and its contribution to long-standing and emerging infectious diseases.
Type of project Research group
Jörgen Johansson Lab
Our group study stress regulatory mechanisms and RNA-mediated regulation in the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogen.
Type of project Research group
Ulrich von Pawel-Rammingen Group
Streptococcal IgG degrading proteases: Important virulence factors and biotechnological tools
Type of project Research group
Maria Fällman Lab
Molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial persistence in host tissue.
Type of project Research group
Bernt Eric Uhlin Lab
Bacterial fitness mechanisms of the versatile pathogenic variants of Escherichia coli and the emerging opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter...
Type of project Profilområde
Dan Hultmark Lab
Drosophila cellular innate immunity, and mechanisms of persistent viral infections.
Type of project Research group
Andrea Puhar lab
Endogenous danger signals in infection and inflammation.
Type of project Research group
Oliver Billker Lab
The Billker lab studies how different species of Plasmodium, the parasites that cause malaria, spread between a human or animal host and mosquitoes...
Type of project Research group
Sven Bergström Lab
The group is studying the infectious and virulence properties of Borrelia spirochete and the intracellular parasite Chlamydia.
Type of project Research group
Victoria Shingler Lab
We do research about bacterial signal-sensing and Integration.
Type of project Research group
Teresa Frisan Lab
We study the role of bacterial genotoxins in modulation of intestinal mucosa homeostasis.
Type of project Research group
Sun Nyunt Wai Lab
Exploring modulation of host cell signaling mediated by secreted bacterial factors.
Type of project Research group
The immune response in Drosophila
Though of vital importance, our innate immune defence is not well understood and the mechanisms involved are therefore of immediate interest to...
Type of project Research project
Duration 9 March 2007 until 31 December 2008
Microbe-induced antimicrobial responses in host cells -subverting effects of microbial virulence effectors
Type of project Research project
Duration 26 February 2007 until 31 December 2007

Genetics, Epigenetics and Evolution

A major challenge in biology is to link genomic variations to biological functions. Differences in gene sequences together with how, when and where genes are activated and expressed result in differences among individuals and species. Comparative sequence analysis allows us to, for example, predict novel antibiotic resistance determinants for experimental validation and retrace the molecular evolution of resistance factors from housekeeping genes. Using model organisms we study gene regulation, epigenetics, genome structure and function and their role in evolution. In our different projects we use classical genetic techniques combined with large scale sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis.

Peter Lind
Assistant professor
E-mail
Email
Yuri Schwartz
Associate professor
E-mail
Email
Epigenetic regulation by Polycomb-Trithorax system: leaving the mark on histones and other proteins
is financed by the Swedish Research Council.
Type of project Research project
Duration 1 January 2022 until 31 December 2025
Chromosomal Gene Regulatory Systems and Chromosome-Specific Adaptations
supported by the Swedish Research Council.
Type of project Research project
Duration 1 January 2021 until 31 December 2024
Peter Lind Lab
Modelling to predict the evolution of biofilm mutants and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas bacteria
Type of project Research group
Jan Larsson Lab
The focus of our research group is to understand chromosome-specific gene regulation and chromosome specific adaptations.
Type of project Research group
Yuri Schwartz lab
All cells of our bodies have the same genes. Yet only some of them are used in any given cell type. So-called epigenetic mechanisms ensure that...
Type of project Research group
Gene regulation in Drosophila
A specific cell in the body needs to know what function it has and maintain this function for the entire life of the individual. This kind of "cell...
Type of project Research project
Duration 5 December 2007 until 31 December 2010

Cell Growth, Disease and Cancer Biology

Eukaryotic cells are exposed to a diversity of stimulatory factors and danger signals that alter their growth trajectories. Stimulatory factors drive cell proliferation through modulation of tight transcriptional and translational control, while danger signal subvert growth and can even lead to cell death. Malfunctioning of these systems can promote inflammatory diseases and facilitate processes that ultimately lead to tumour and/or cancer progression.

Anders Byström
Professor emeritus, professor
E-mail
Email
Andrea Puhar
Research fellow
E-mail
Email
Saskia Erttmann
Senior research engineer (on leave), assistant professor
E-mail
Email
Thomas Grundström
Professor emeritus
E-mail
Email
Jenny Persson's Research Group
We study cancer metastasis and targeted therapies.
Type of project Research group
Thomas Grundström lab
Our research group tries to understand the control of mutagenesis and class switch recombination of antibody genes.
Type of project Research group
Artificial intelligence in oncology: European REVERT
REVERT, is a EU Horizon 2020 funded project aiming to apply artificial intelligence to develop predictive algorithms to be used in clinical treatme...
Type of project Research project
Duration 1 January 2020 until 31 December 2023
Andrea Puhar lab
Endogenous danger signals in infection and inflammation.
Type of project Research group
Saskia Erttmann Lab
Insight into inflammatory diseases – understanding the molecular mechanisms during the onset and resolution of inflammation.
Type of project Research group
Teresa Frisan Lab
We study the role of bacterial genotoxins in modulation of intestinal mucosa homeostasis.
Type of project Research group
GlycoImaging
Imaging and detection of tumor-associated glycan structures on tumor cells.
Type of project Research project
Duration 1 April 2018 until 31 March 2021

Cell Physiology and Development

Understanding cell physiology is a major task of basic molecular biology within many different research areas. Our research includes elucidating the development of the wiring of our senses, the underlying structural components that shape our cells, and the mechanisms of our immune systems. Such molecular-level understanding is required to decipher the workings of multicellular organisms and their transient and persistent interactions with microbes.

Anders Byström
Professor emeritus, professor
E-mail
Email
Dan Hultmark
Professor emeritus
E-mail
Email
Maria Fällman
Research fellow, professor
E-mail
Email
Saskia Erttmann
Senior research engineer (on leave), assistant professor
E-mail
Email
Maria Fällman Lab
Molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial persistence in host tissue.
Type of project Research group
Dan Hultmark Lab
Drosophila cellular innate immunity, and mechanisms of persistent viral infections.
Type of project Research group
Saskia Erttmann Lab
Insight into inflammatory diseases – understanding the molecular mechanisms during the onset and resolution of inflammation.
Type of project Research group
Homeostatic control of olfaction and taste
Our group is interested in the essential regulatory processes that control and maintain neuronal activity and which malfunction cause diseases like...
Type of project Research group
Teresa Frisan Lab
We study the role of bacterial genotoxins in modulation of intestinal mucosa homeostasis.
Type of project Research group
Sun Nyunt Wai Lab
Exploring modulation of host cell signaling mediated by secreted bacterial factors.
Type of project Research group
The immune response in Drosophila
Though of vital importance, our innate immune defence is not well understood and the mechanisms involved are therefore of immediate interest to...
Type of project Research project
Duration 9 March 2007 until 31 December 2008
Microbe-induced antimicrobial responses in host cells -subverting effects of microbial virulence effectors
Type of project Research project
Duration 26 February 2007 until 31 December 2007