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Jan Larsson

Research group Our research group is interested in chromosome-wide gene regulatory mechanisms with focus on: (1) Deciphering the targeting mechanisms used by chromosome-wide gene regulatory complexes in particular and epigenetic regulators in general. (2) Delineating the mechanisms for coordinated chromosome-wide gene regulation. (3) Understanding the evolution of chromosome-wide gene targeting and regulation, sex-chromosomes and the role of heterochromatin and non-coding RNA in these processes.

Our research
The only chromosome-wide targeting mechanisms recognised until recently were the dosage compensation mechanisms that equalize the transcriptional activity of the single male X-chromosome and the two female X-chromosomes. However, our discovery that POF is involved in global regulation of the genes of Drosophila’s chromosome 4 provided the first evidence of another chromosome-specific transcription mechanism apart from the sex-chromosome dosage compensation mechanisms. At present, POF is the most compelling example of a chromosome targeting mechanism adapted to the long-range targeting of regulatory factors to an autosome, it provides a novel model to study chromatin targeting and a challenging new biological concept.
Our genetic analysis of chromosome-wide regulatory systems is focused on: (1) Deciphering the targeting mechanisms used by chromosome-wide gene regulatory complexes in particular and epigenetic regulators in general. (2) Delineating the mechanisms for coordinated chromosome-wide gene regulation. (3) Understanding the evolution of chromosome-wide gene targeting and regulation, sex-chromosomes and the role of heterochromatin and non-coding RNA in these processes. We believe that our work will contribute to our understanding of epigenetic regulatory complexes; how they are targeted and established, how they regulate targeted genes and how they evolve.

Head of research

Overview

Participating departments and units at Umeå University

Department of Molecular Biology