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Department of Molecular Biology

The Department of Molecular Biology is unique, being affiliated to both the Faculty of Science and Technology and to the Faculty of Medicine. The department has a pronounced dynamic international profile with faculty, students and guest researchers from many different countries. Researchers work in modern laboratories with well-equipped common facilities to create a framework for a creative and highly interactive environment. Specific research interests of the independent groups are interconnected by a common interest in fundamental and translational research concerning the molecular mechanisms of both bacterial and eukaryotic systems.

Many of our research groups are affiliated with the interdisciplinary "Umeå Centre for Microbial Research" (UCMR) founded by our department. The department also hosts "Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS) – the Swedish node of "The Nordic-EMBL Partnership for Molecular Medicine". As the main driver of these centres of excellence and one of the largest departments at Umeå University, we provide undergraduate courses within Medical, Dental, Life Science, and Civil Engineer programs. For further information, please pursue the links below.

Research

Education

News

Studies factors that ensure cellular protein production
Published: 16 Jan, 2020

In his thesis, Fu Xu contributes to new knowledge about the factors that modulate tRNA-biogenesis.

Ellen will find targets for a malaria vaccine
Published: 03 Dec, 2019

Wallenberg Academy Fellow Ellen Bushell will map the ways a variant of the malaria infects.

Umeå researchers in scientific breakthrough for malaria research
Published: 14 Nov, 2019

Research team publishes in Cell seven metabolic pathsways that the malaria parasite to infect the liver.

Targeted Gene Modification in Animal Pathogenic Chlamydia
Published: 07 Nov, 2019

MIMS researchers for the first time performed targeted gene mutation in the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia.